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Citigroup
Citigroup
Citigroup
Inc. or Citi (/sɪteɪ/see-tee; stylized as citi) is an American multinational investment bank and financial services company headquartered in New York City, New York. The company was formed by the merger of banking giant Citicorp
Citicorp
and financial conglomerate Travelers Group
Travelers Group
in 1998; however, Travelers was spun off from the company in 2002.[2][3] Citigroup
Citigroup
now owns Citicorp, holding company for Citibank, and several international subsidiaries.[4] Citigroup
Citigroup
is the 4th largest bank in the United States
United States
maintaining itself as one of the American Big Four, alongside J.P. Morgan Chase, Bank
Bank
of America, and Wells Fargo.[5] Its investment banking practices and market share include it within the "Bulge Bracket" of financial institutions
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Private Banking
Private banking is banking, investment and other financial services provided by banks to high-net-worth individuals (HNWIs) with high levels of income or sizable assets. The term "private" refers to customer service rendered on a more personal basis than in mass-market retail banking, usually via dedicated bank advisers. It does not refer to a private bank, which is a non-incorporated banking institution. Private banking forms a more exclusive (for the especially affluent) subset of wealth management
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Mass Affluent
In marketing and financial services, mass affluent and emerging affluent are the high end of the mass market, or individuals with US$100,000 to US$1,000,000 of liquid financial assets[1] plus an annual household income over US$75,000.[2] Mass affluent
Mass affluent
consumers are an important target market for sellers of luxury goods.Contents1 Difference from upper middle income 2 In the United States 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksDifference from upper middle income[edit] There may be a high correlation between the households in the upper-middle reaches of the income strata and the mass affluent, but there are differences. Social class is the result of a person's function within society rather than merely the income of the household in which he or she resides. Both terms refer to people whose wealth or income is above the average, yet below the top
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Mexico
Coordinates: 23°N 102°W / 23°N 102°W / 23; -102United Mexican States Estados Unidos Mexicanos  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Himno Nacional Mexicano" (English: "Mexican National Anthem")Capital and largest city Mexico
Mexico
City 19°26′N 99°08′W / 19.433°N 99.133°W / 19.433; -99.133Official languagesNone at federal level[b] Spanish (de facto)Recognized regional languagesSpanish 68 native languages[1]National language Spanish[b]Religion83% Roman Catholicism 10% Other Christian 0.2% Othe
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Mortgage-backed Security
A mortgage-backed security (MBS) is a type of asset-backed security that is secured by a mortgage or collection of mortgages. The mortgages are sold to a group of individuals (a government agency or investment bank) that securitizes, or packages, the loans together into a security that investors can buy.[1] The mortgages of an MBS may be residential or commercial, depending on whether it is an Agency MBS or a Non-Agency MBS; in the United States they may be issued by structures set up by government-sponsored enterprises like Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, or they can be "private-label", issued by structures set up by investment banks. The structure of the MBS may be known as "pass-through", where the interest and principal payments from the borrower or homebuyer pass through it to the MBS holder, or it may be more complex, made up of a pool of other MBSs
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United States Treasury
The Department of the Treasury
Treasury
(USDT)[1] is an executive department and the treasury of the United States federal government. Established by an Act of Congress
Act of Congress
in 1789 to manage government revenue, its responsibilities include producing currency and coinage, collecting taxes and paying bills of the US government, managing the federal finances, supervising banks and thrifts, and advising on fiscal policy.[2] The Department is administered by the Secretary of the Treasury, who is a member of the Cabinet
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Fortune 500
The Fortune 500
Fortune 500
is an annual list compiled and published by Fortune magazine that ranks 500 of the largest United States
United States
corporations by total revenue for their respective fiscal years.[2] The list includes publicly held companies, along with privately held companies for which revenues are publicly available. The concept of the Fortune 500
Fortune 500
was created by Edgar P. Smith, a Fortune editor, and the first list was published in 1955.[3][4] The Fortune 500
Fortune 500
is more commonly used than its subset Fortune 100 or wider list Fortune 1000.[5]Contents1 Methodology 2 History 3 Fortune 500
Fortune 500
lists 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksMethodology[edit] The original Fortune 500
Fortune 500
was limited to companies whose revenues were derived from manufacturing, mining, and energy exploration
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Style (visual Arts)
In the visual arts, style is a "...distinctive manner which permits the grouping of works into related categories"[1] or "...any distinctive, and therefore recognizable, way in which an act is performed or an artifact made or ought to be performed and made".[2] It refers to the visual appearance of a work of art that relates it to other works by the same artist or one from the same period, training, location, "school", art movement or archaeological culture: "The notion of style has long been the art historian's principal mode of classifying works of art. By style he selects and shapes the history of art".[3] Style is often divided into the general style of a period, country or cultural group, group of artists or art movement, and the individual style of the artist within that group style
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Basel III
Basel III (or the Third Basel Accord or Basel Standards) is a global, voluntary regulatory framework on bank capital adequacy, stress testing, and market liquidity risk. It was agreed upon by the members of the Basel Committee on Banking
Banking
Supervision in 2010–11, and was scheduled to be introduced from 2013 until 2015; however, changes from 1 April 2013 extended implementation until 31 March 2018 and again extended to 31 March 2019.[1][2] The third installment of the Basel Accords (see Basel I, Basel II) was developed in response to the deficiencies in financial regulation revealed by the financial crisis of 2007–08
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Public Company
A public company, publicly traded company, publicly held company, publicly listed company, or public corporation is a corporation whose ownership is dispersed among the general public in many shares of stock which are freely traded on a stock exchange or in over the counter markets. In some jurisdictions, public companies over a certain size must be listed on an exchange
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Equity (finance)
In accounting, equity (or owner's equity) is the difference between the value of the assets and the value of the liabilities of something owned. It is governed by the following equation: Equity = Assets − Liabilities displaystyle text Equity = text Assets - text Liabilities For example, if someone owns a car worth $15,000 (an asset), but owes $5,000 on a loan against that car (a liability), the car represents $10,000 of equity. Equity can be negative if liabilities exceed assets. Shareholders' equity (or stockholders' equity, shareholders' funds, shareholders' capital or similar terms) represents the equity of a company as divided among shareholders of common or preferred stock. Negative shareholders' equity is often referred to as a shareholders' deficit. Alternatively, equity can also refer to the capital stock of a corporation. The value of the stock depends on the corporation's future economic prospects
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Asset
In financial accounting, an asset is an economic resource. Anything tangible or intangible that can be owned or controlled to produce value and that is held by a company to produce positive economic value is an asset. Simply stated, assets represent value of ownership that can be converted into cash (although cash itself is also considered an asset).[1] The balance sheet of a firm records the monetary[2] value of the assets owned by that firm. It covers money and other valuables belonging to an individual or to a business.[1] One can classify assets into two major asset classes: tangible assets and intangible assets. Tangible assets contain various subclasses, including current assets and fixed assets.[3] Current assets include inventory, while fixed assets include such items as buildings and equipment.[4] Intangible assets are nonphysical resources and rights that have a value to the firm because they give the firm some kind of advantage in the marketplace
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Net Income
In business, net income (total comprehensive income, net earnings, net profit, informally, bottom line) is an entity's income minus cost of goods sold, expenses and taxes for an accounting period.[1] It is computed as the residual of all revenues and gains over all expenses and losses for the period,[2] and has also been defined as the net increase in shareholders' equity that results from a company's operations.[3] In the context of the presentation of financial statements, the IFRS Foundation
IFRS Foundation
defines net income as synonymous with profit and loss.[1] Net income
Net income
is the same as net profit but a distinct accounting concept from profit
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Earnings Before Interest And Taxes
In accounting and finance, earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), is a measure of a firm's profit that includes all expenses except interest and income tax expenses.[1] It is the difference between operating revenues and operating expenses. When a firm does not have non-operating income, operating income is sometimes used as a synonym for EBIT and operating profit.[2]EBIT = revenue – operating expenses (OPEX)Operating income = revenue – operating expenses[1] A professional investor contemplating a change to the capital structure of a firm (e.g., through a leveraged buyout) first evaluates a firm's fundamental earnings potential (reflected by earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) and EBIT), and then determines the optimal use of debt vs. equity. To calculate EBIT, expenses (e.g
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United States Dollar
 United States  East Timor[2][Note 1]  Ecuador[3][Note 2]  El Salvador[4]  Federated States of Micronesia  Marshall Islands  Palau  Panama[Note 3]  Zimbabwe[Note 4]3 non-U.S
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