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Cirrus Logic
Cirrus Logic
Cirrus Logic
Inc. is a fabless semiconductor supplier that specializes in analog, mixed-signal, and audio DSP integrated circuits (ICs).[2] Since 1998, the company's headquarters have been in Austin, Texas.[2][3] The company's audio processors and audio converters feature in many professional audio and consumer entertainment products, including smartphones, tablets, digital headsets, automotive entertainment systems, home-theater receivers, and smart home applications, such as smart speakers. Dr
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Rambus
Rambus
Rambus
Incorporated, founded in 1990, is an American technology licensing company, and has also been labelled as a patent troll.[1][2] The company became well known for its intellectual property-based litigation following the introduction of DDR-SDRAM
DDR-SDRAM
memory.[3]Contents1 History 2 Technology 3 Lawsuits3.1 Patent Lawsuits 3.2 Federal Trade Commission Anti-Trust Suits 3.3 European Commission
European Commission
Anti-Trust Suit 3.4 Recent Settlements4 Management team 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Rambus, a California company, was incorporated in 1990 and re-incorporated in the state of Delaware in 1997. The company was listed on NASDAQ
NASDAQ
in 1997 under the code RMBS
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Trident Microsystems
Trident Microsystems
Trident Microsystems
was a fabless semiconductor company that in the 1990s was a well-known supplier of graphics chipsets used in video cards and on motherboards for desktop PCs and laptops
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Western Digital
Western Digital
Western Digital
Corporation (commonly referred to as Western Digital and often abbreviated as WDC) is an American computer data storage company and one of the largest computer hard disk drive manufacturers in the world, along with its main competitor Seagate Technology.[2] Western Digital
Western Digital
Corporation has a long history in the electronics industry as an integrated circuit maker and a storage products company. Western Digital
Western Digital
was founded on April 23, 1970, by Alvin B. Phillips, a Motorola
Motorola
employee, as General Digital, initially (and briefly) a manufacturer of MOS test equipment
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8-bit Color
8-bit color graphics is a method of storing image information in a computer's memory or in an image file, such that each pixel is represented by one 8-bit byte. The maximum number of colors that can be displayed at any one time is 256. There are two forms of 8-bit color graphics. The most common uses a separate palette of 256 colors, where each of the 256 entries in the palette map is given red, green, and blue values. In most color maps, each color is usually chosen from a palette of 16,777,216 colors (24 bits: 8 red, 8 green, 8 blue). But in the original VGA
VGA
card's 320x200 mode, 256 on-screen colors could be chosen from a palette of 262,144 colors (18 bits: 6 red, 6 green, 6 blue)
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Public Company
A public company, publicly traded company, publicly held company, publicly listed company, or public corporation is a corporation whose ownership is dispersed among the general public in many shares of stock which are freely traded on a stock exchange or in over the counter markets. In some jurisdictions, public companies over a certain size must be listed on an exchange
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Peripheral Component Interconnect
Conventional PCI, often shortened to PCI, is a local computer bus for attaching hardware devices in a computer. PCI is the initialism for Peripheral Component Interconnect[2] and is part of the PCI Local Bus standard. The PCI bus supports the functions found on a processor bus but in a standardized format that is independent of any particular processor's native bus. Devices connected to the PCI bus appear to a bus master to be connected directly to its own bus and are assigned addresses in the processor's address space[3]. It is a parallel bus, synchronous to a single bus clock. Attached devices can take either the form of an integrated circuit fitted onto the motherboard itself (called a planar device in the PCI specification) or an expansion card that fits into a slot. The PCI Local Bus was first implemented in IBM PC compatibles, where it displaced the combination of several slow ISA slots and one fast VESA Local Bus slot as the bus configuration
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S3 Graphics
S3 Graphics, Ltd (commonly referred to as S3) is an American computer graphics company. The company is perhaps best known for its ViRGE
ViRGE
and its much improved successor Savage 3D and Chrome series. Struggling against competition from 3dfx Interactive, ATI and Nvidia
Nvidia
during the height of the 3D accelerator
3D accelerator
wars, the graphics portion of the company was spun off into a new joint effort with VIA Technologies. The new company focused on the mobile graphics market, and became a major player in this space
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VESA Local Bus
The VESA
VESA
Local Bus (usually abbreviated to VL-Bus or VLB) is a short-lived expansion bus that was mostly used in personal computers. VESA
VESA
(Video Electronics Standards Association) Local Bus worked alongside the ISA bus, acting as a high-speed conduit for memory-mapped I/O
I/O
and DMA, while the ISA bus handled interrupts and port-mapped I/O.Contents1 Historical overview 2 Limitations 3 Legacy 4 Technical data 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistorical overview[edit]An ATI MACH64 SVGA
SVGA
VLB graphics cardIn the early 1990s, the I/O
I/O
bandwidth of the ISA bus was becoming a critical bottleneck to PC graphics performance. The need for faster graphics was being driven by increasing adoption of graphical user interfaces in PC operating systems
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Graphics Device Interface
The Graphics Device Interface
Graphics Device Interface
(GDI) is a Microsoft Windows
Microsoft Windows
application programming interface and core operating system component responsible for representing graphical objects and transmitting them to output devices such as monitors and printers. GDI is responsible for tasks such as drawing lines and curves, rendering fonts and handling palettes. It is not directly responsible for drawing windows, menus, etc.; that task is reserved for the user subsystem, which resides in user32.dll and is built atop GDI. Other systems have components that are similar to GDI, for example macOS' Quartz and X Window System's Xlib/XCB. GDI's most significant advantages over more direct methods of accessing the hardware are perhaps its scaling capabilities and its abstract representation of target devices
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Texture Mapping
Texture mapping[1][2][3] is a method for defining high frequency detail, surface texture, or color information on a computer-generated graphic or 3D model. Its application to 3D graphics was pioneered by Edwin Catmull
Edwin Catmull
in 1974.[4] Texture mapping
Texture mapping
originally referred to a method (now more accurately called diffuse mapping) that simply wrapped and mapped pixels from a texture to a 3D surface
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Bilinear Filtering
Bilinear filtering is a texture filtering method used to smooth textures when displayed larger or smaller than they actually are. Most of the time, when drawing a textured shape on the screen, the texture is not displayed exactly as it is stored, without any distortion. Because of this, most pixels will end up needing to use a point on the texture that is "between" texels – assuming the texels are points (as opposed to, say, squares) – in the middle (or on the upper left corner, or anywhere else; it does not matter, as long as it is consistent) of their respective "cells"
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Graphics Pipeline
In computer graphics, a computer graphics pipeline, rendering pipeline or simply graphics pipeline, is a conceptual model that describes what steps a graphics system needs to perform to render a 3D scene to a 2D screen.[1] Once a 3D model
3D model
has been created, for instance in a video game or any other 3D computer animation, the graphics pipeline is the process of turning that 3D model into what the computer displays.[2]   Because the steps required for this operation depend on the software and hardware used and the desired display characteristics, there is no universal graphics pipeline suitable for all cases. However, graphics APIs such as Direct3D
Direct3D
and OpenGL
OpenGL
were created to unify similar steps and to control the graphics pipeline of a given hardware accelerator
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Gouraud Shading
Gouraud shading, named after Henri Gouraud, is an interpolation method used in computer graphics to produce continuous shading of surfaces represented by polygon meshes. In practice, Gouraud shading
Gouraud shading
is most often used to achieve continuous lighting on triangle surfaces by computing the lighting at the corners of each triangle and linearly interpolating the resulting colours for each pixel covered by the triangle. Gouraud first published the technique in 1971.[1][2][3]Contents1 Description 2 Comparison with other shading techniques 3 See also 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] Gouraud shading
Gouraud shading
works as follows: An estimate to the surface normal of each vertex in a polygonal 3D model is either specified for each vertex or found by averaging the surface normals of the polygons that meet at each vertex. Using these estimates, lighting computations based on a reflection model, e.g
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Alpha Blending
In computer graphics, alpha compositing is the process of combining an image with a background to create the appearance of partial or full transparency. It is often useful to render image elements in separate passes, and then combine the resulting multiple 2D images into a single, final image called the composite. For example, compositing is used extensively when combining computer-rendered image elements with live footage. In order to combine these image elements correctly, it is necessary to keep an associated matte for each element
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