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Circus Renz (film)
A circus is a company of performers who put on diverse entertainment shows that include clowns, acrobats, trained animals, trapeze acts, musicians, dancers, hoopers, tightrope walkers, jugglers, magicians, unicyclists, as well as other object manipulation and stunt-oriented artists. The term 'circus' also describes the performance which has followed various formats through its 250-year modern history. Philip Astley is credited with being the 'father' of the modern circus when he opened the first circus in 1768 in England. A skilled equestrian, Astley demonstrated trick riding, riding in a circle rather than a straight line as his rivals did, and thus chanced on the format which was later named a 'circus'. In 1770 he hired acrobats, tightrope walkers, jugglers and a clown to fill in the pauses between acts. Performances developed significantly through the next fifty years, with large-scale theatrical battle reenactments becoming a significant feature
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Circus (other)
A circus is a traveling company of performers that may include acrobats, clowns, trained animals, and other novelty acts. Circus
Circus
or The Circus
Circus
may also refer to:Contents1 Art and architecture 2 Film and television 3 Literature 4 Music4.1 Musicians 4.2 Albums 4.3 Songs5 Other
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Circus Maximus
The Circus Maximus
Circus Maximus
( Latin
Latin
for greatest or largest circus; Italian: Circo Massimo) is an ancient Roman chariot-racing stadium and mass entertainment venue located in Rome, Italy. Situated in the valley between the Aventine and Palatine Hills, it was the first and largest stadium in ancient Rome
Rome
and its later Empire
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Romanization
Romanization
Romanization
(also spelled romanisation: see spelling differences), in linguistics, is the conversion of writing from a different writing system to the Roman (Latin) script, or a system for doing so. Methods of romanization include transliteration, for representing written text, and transcription, for representing the spoken word, and combinations of both
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Metathesis (linguistics)
Metathesis (/mɪˈtæθɪsɪs/; from Greek μετάθεσις, from μετατίθημι "I put in a different order"; Latin: trānspositiō) is the transposition of sounds or syllables in a word or of words in a sentence
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Homeric Greek
Homeric Greek is the form of the Greek language
Greek language
that was used by Homer in the Iliad
Iliad
and Odyssey
Odyssey
and in the Homeric Hymns
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Sells Brothers Circus
Sells Brothers Circus
Sells Brothers Circus
was a circus that was started by Lewis Sells and Peter Sells in Columbus, Ohio, United States. History[edit] The circus ran from 1862 to 1863 and again from 1871 to 1895. The circus was based out of Columbus, Ohio
Columbus, Ohio
in an area that was known as Sellsville.[1] Sellsville was of considerable size, and many animals and staff lived in the area during the off seasons.[2] It merged with the circus operated by Adam Forepaugh
Adam Forepaugh
to form the Forepaugh-Sells Brothers' Circus in 1900.[3] The 1901 silent film Day at the Circus by Edison Manufacturing Company features a parade and horse race from the circus. References[edit]^ Ferenchik, Mark. "Traveling Circus formed Heart of Sellsville Community". Dispatch. Retrieved 2018-02-09.  ^ "Sells Bros. Circus". Circus in America. Retrieved 2009-12-04.  ^ "Forepaugh-Sells Brothers' Circus"
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Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western)
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Circus (building)
The Roman circus (from Latin, "circle") was a large open-air venue used for public events in the ancient Roman Empire. The circuses were similar to the ancient Greek hippodromes, although circuses served varying purposes and differed in design and construction. Along with theatres and amphitheatres, Circuses were one of the main entertainment sites of the time
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Hippodrome
The hippodrome (Greek: ἱππόδρομος) was an ancient Grecian stadium for horse racing and chariot racing. The name is derived from the Greek words hippos (ἵππος; "horse") and dromos (δρόμος; "course"). The term is used in the modern French language and some others, with the meaning of "horse racecourse". Hence, some present-day horse racing tracks also include the word hippodrome[1] in their names, such as the Hippodrome de Vincennes
Hippodrome de Vincennes
and the Central Moscow Hippodrome.Contents1 Overview 2 List of Greek hippodromes 3 List of Roman hippodromes 4 List of modern horse racing venues 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOverview[edit] The Greek hippodrome was similar to the Roman Circus
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George Speaight
George Victor Speaight (/speɪt/; 6 September 1914 – 22 December 2005) was a theatre historian, author and performer and the leading authority on 19th-century toy theatre.Contents1 Early years 2 War service 3 Later life 4 References 5 External linksEarly years[edit] One of his brothers was the Shakespearean actor Robert Speaight, who paid for some of George's education at Haileybury. Like his older brother, George Speaight
George Speaight
was a gifted and natural performer from a young age. Aged four years old his first role was as the Page in a family production of Romeo and Juliet, and in 1921 he won an elocution prize for the Ghost's speech in Hamlet.[1] George Speaight
George Speaight
was fascinated from his boyhood by toy theatres after his father bought him one from Benjamin Pollock's Toy Shop
Benjamin Pollock's Toy Shop
in Hoxton,[1] and in the 1930s he professionally took up puppetry
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Circus Flaminius
Coordinates: 41°53′34″N 12°28′39″E / 41.8927578°N 12.4774218°E / 41.8927578; 12.4774218Engraving of the Circus Flaminius
Circus Flaminius
by Giacomo Lauro
Giacomo Lauro
in 1641.The Circus Flaminius
Circus Flaminius
was a large, circular area in ancient Rome, located in the southern end of the Campus Martius
Campus Martius
near the Tiber River.[1] It contained a small race-track used for obscure games, and various other buildings and monuments. It was ‘built,’ or sectioned off, by Gaius Flaminius
Gaius Flaminius
in 221 BC.[2]Contents1 Topography and structures 2 Use 3 Notes 4 SourcesTopography and structures[edit] In its early existence, the Circus was a loop, approximately 500 meters in length stretching across the Flaminian Fields. During the 2nd century BC, this broad space was encroached upon by buildings and monuments
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Philip Astley
Philip Astley
Philip Astley
(8 January 1742 – 27 January 1814) was an English equestrian, circus owner, and inventor, regarded as being the "father of the modern circus".[1][2] The circus industry, as a presenter of an integrated entertainment experience that includes music, domesticated animals, acrobats, and clowns, traces its heritage to Astley's Amphitheatre, a riding school that Astley founded in London following the success of his invention of the circus ring in 1768.[3] Astley rode in a circle rather than a straight line as his rivals did, and thus chanced on the format which was later named a circus.[4] He performed his st
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Circus Of Maxentius
Coordinates: 41°51′17″N 12°31′20.83″E / 41.85472°N 12.5224528°E / 41.85472; 12.5224528Part of the ruins of the Circus of MaxentiusCircus of Maxentius
Maxentius
in ancient timesThe Circus of Maxentius
Maxentius
(known until the 19th century as the Circus of Caracalla) is an ancient structure in Rome, Italy; it is part of a complex of buildings erected by emperor Maxentius
Maxentius
on the Via Appia between AD 306 and 312
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