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Cioccolato Di Modica
Modica
Modica
[ˈmɔːdika] (Sicilian: Muòrica, Greek: Μότουκα, Motouka, Latin: Mutyca or Motyca) is a city and comune of 54.456 inhabitants in the Province of Ragusa, Sicily, southern Italy. The city is situated in the Hyblaean Mountains. Modica
Modica
has neolithic origins and it represents the historical capital of the area which today almost corresponds to the Province of Ragusa. Until the 19th century it was the capital of a County that exercised a so wide political, economical and cultural influence as it has been counted among the most powerful feuds of the Mezzogiorno. Today Modica
Modica
is well known for its rich repertoire of culinary specialities, especially the typical chocolate inspired by an aztec recipe, and for its historical centre
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Arturo Di Modica
Arturo Di Modica
Arturo Di Modica
(born January 26, 1941) is an Italian artist, born in Vittoria, Sicily
Vittoria, Sicily
who became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He is best known for his sculpture Charging Bull
Charging Bull
(also known as the Wall Street Bull, in reference to Wall Street), which he installed without permission in front of the New York Stock Exchange
New York Stock Exchange
in December 1987.[1][2] The work cost US$350,000 of the artist's own money
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Punic Wars
The Punic Wars
Punic Wars
were a series of three wars fought between Rome and Carthage
Carthage
from 264 BC to 146 BC.[1] At the time, they were some of the largest wars that had ever taken place.[2] The term Punic comes from the Latin
Latin
word Punicus (or Poenicus), meaning "Carthaginian", with reference to the Carthaginians' Phoenician ancestry.[3] The main cause of the Punic Wars
Punic Wars
was the conflicts of interest between the existing Carthaginian Empire and the expanding Roman Republic. The Romans were initially interested in expansion via Sicily
Sicily
(which at that time was a cultural melting pot), part of which lay under Carthaginian control. At the start of the First Punic War
First Punic War
(264-241 BC), Carthage
Carthage
was the dominant power of the Western Mediterranean, with an extensive maritime empire
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1693 Sicily Earthquake
The 1693 Sicily
Sicily
earthquake struck parts of southern Italy
Italy
near Sicily, Calabria, and Malta
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Val Di Noto
Val di Noto
Noto
(English: Province of Noto[1]) is a historical and geographical area encompassing the south-eastern third of Sicily; it is dominated by the limestone Iblean plateau. Historically, it was one of the three valli of Sicily.Chiesa di San Domenico - NotoHistory[edit] The oldest recorded settlement in the Val di Noto
Noto
was the ancient town of Akrai, near Palazzolo Acreide, which was founded in 664 BC. It was the first colony of the Corinthian settlement at Syracuse. The settlements of the Val di Noto
Noto
were completely destroyed by the enormous 1693 Sicily
Sicily
earthquake. Following the earthquake, many towns were rebuilt on entirely new sites, such as Noto
Noto
and Grammichele
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UNESCO Heritage Sites
A World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
is a landmark or area which is selected by the United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as having cultural, historical, scientific or other form of significance, and is legally protected by international treaties. The sites are judged important to the collective interests of humanity. To be selected, a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
must be an already classified landmark, unique in some respect as a geographically and historically identifiable place having special cultural or physical significance (such as an ancient ruin or historical structure, building, city, complex, desert, forest, island, lake, monument, mountain, or wilderness area)
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Thucydides
Thucydides
Thucydides
(/θjuːˈsɪdɪdiːz/; Ancient Greek: Θουκυδίδης, Thoukydídēs, [tʰuːkydídɛːs]; c. 460 – c. 400 BC) was an Athenian
Athenian
historian and general. His History of the Peloponnesian War
History of the Peloponnesian War
recounts the fifth-century BC war between Sparta
Sparta
and Athens
Athens
until the year 411 BC
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Sicels
The Sicels
Sicels
(Latin: Siculi; Ancient Greek: Σικελοί Sikeloi) were an Italic tribe who inhabited eastern Sicily
Sicily
during the Iron Age. Their neighbours to the west were the Sicani. The Sicels
Sicels
gave Sicily the name it has held since antiquity, but they rapidly fused into the culture of Magna Graecia.Contents1 History 2 Language 3 Mythology 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Sources 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] Archaeological excavation has shown some Mycenean influence on Bronze Age Sicily
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Syracuse, Italy
Syracuse (/ˈsɪrəˌkjuːs, -ˌkjuːz/; Italian: Siracusa, pronounced [siraˈkuːza] ( listen); Sicilian: Sarausa/Seragusa; Latin: Syrācūsae; Ancient Greek: Συράκουσαι, Syrakousai;[3] Medieval Greek: Συρακοῦσαι) is a historic city on the island of Sicily, the capital of the Italian province of Syracuse. The city is notable for its rich Greek history, culture, amphitheatres, architecture, and as the birthplace of the preeminent mathematician and engineer Archimedes.[4] This 2,700-year-old city played a key role in ancient times, when it was one of the major powers of the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
world. Syracuse is located in the southeast corner of the island of Sicily, next to the Gulf of Syracuse beside the Ionian Sea. The city was founded by Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
Corinthians and Teneans[5] and became a very powerful city-state
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Ancient Rome
In historiography, ancient Rome
Rome
is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome
Rome
in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
until the fall of the western empire.[1] The term is sometimes used to just refer to the kingdom and republic periods, excluding the subsequent empire.[2] The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome
Rome
and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed
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Egadi
The Aegadian Islands
Aegadian Islands
(Italian: Isole Egadi; Sicilian: Ìsuli Ègadi, Latin: Aegates Insulae, Greek: Αιγάται Νήσοι, meaning "the islands of goats") are a group of five small mountainous islands in the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
off the northwest coast of Sicily, Italy, near the cities of Trapani
Trapani
and Marsala, with a total area of 37.45 square kilometres (14.46 sq mi). The Island of Favignana
Favignana
(Aegusa), the largest, lies 16 kilometres (9.9 mi) southwest of Trapani; Levanzo
Levanzo
(Phorbantia) lies 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) west; and Marettimo, the ancient Iera Nesos, 24 kilometres (15 mi) west of Trapani, is now reckoned as a part of the group. There are also two minor islands, Formica and Maraone, lying between Levanzo
Levanzo
and Sicily
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Carthaginians
The Punics
Punics
(from Latin
Latin
pūnicus, pl. pūnici), also known as Carthaginians, were a people from Ancient Carthage
Ancient Carthage
(now in Tunisia, North Africa) who traced their origins to the Phoenicians. Punic is the English adjective, derived from the Latin
Latin
adjective punicus to describe anything Carthaginian. Their language, Punic, was a dialect of Phoenician. Unlike their Phoenician ancestors, the Carthaginians had a landowning aristocracy, which established a rule of the hinterland in Northern Africa and trans-Saharan trade routes. In later times, one of the clans established a Hellenistic-inspired empire in Iberia and possibly had a foothold in western Gaul. Like other Phoenician people, their urbanized culture and economy were strongly linked to the sea
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Verres
Gaius Verres
Verres
(ca. 120 BC – 43 BC) was a Roman magistrate, notorious for his misgovernment of Sicily. His extortion of local farmers and plundering of temples led to his prosecution by Cicero, whose accusations were so devastating that his defence advocate could only recommend that Verres
Verres
should leave the country. Cicero’s prosecution speeches were later published as the Verrine Orations.Contents1 Biography1.1 Public career 1.2 Trial and exile2 Popular culture references 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (October 2011)Public career[edit]Hellenistic bronze of Sleeping Eros, the type of work that Verres extorted from Sicilian collectorsDuring the Civil War (88-87 BCE), Verres
Verres
initially supported Gaius Marius (157-86 BC) and the Populares, but soon went over to the Optimates. Sulla (c
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Southern Italy
Southern Italy
Italy
or Mezzogiorno (Italian pronunciation: [ˌmɛddzoˈdʒorno],[2] literally "midday") is a macroregion of Italy
Italy
traditionally encompassing the territories of the former Kingdom of the two Sicilies
Kingdom of the two Sicilies
(all the southern section of the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
and Sicily), with the frequent addition of the island of Sardinia.[3][4][5] Southern Italy
Italy
has many major tourist attractions, such as the Palace of Caserta, the Amalfi
Amalfi
Coast, Pompeii
Pompeii
and other archaeological sites (many of which are protected by UNESCO)
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Municipium
Municipium (pl. municipia) was the Latin term for a town or city.[1] Etymologically the municipium was a social contract between municipes, the "duty holders," or citizens of the town. The duties, or munera, were a communal obligation assumed by the municipes in exchange for the privileges and protections of citizenship. Every citizen was a municeps.[2] The distinction of municipia was not made in the Roman kingdom; instead, the immediate neighbors of the city were invited or compelled to transfer their populations to the urban structure of Rome, where they took up residence in neighborhoods and became Romans per se. Under the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
the practical considerations of incorporating communities into the city-state of Rome
Rome
forced the Romans to devise the concept of municipium, a distinct state under the jurisdiction of Rome
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Pliny The Elder
Pliny the Elder
Pliny the Elder
(born Gaius Plinius Secundus, AD 23–79) was a Roman author, naturalist and natural philosopher, a naval and army commander of the early Roman Empire, and friend of emperor Vespasian. Spending most of his spare time studying, writing, and investigating natural and geographic phenomena in the field, Pliny wrote the encyclopedic Naturalis Historia
Naturalis Historia
(Natural History), which became an editorial model for encyclopedias. His nephew, Pliny the Younger, wrote of him in a letter to the historian Tacitus:For my part I deem those blessed to whom, by favour of the gods, it has been granted either to do what is worth writing of, or to write what is worth reading; above measure blessed those on whom both gifts have been conferred
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