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Cicely
MYRRHIS ODORATA, with common names CICELY /ˈsɪsəli/ , SWEET CICELY, MYRRH, GARDEN MYRRH, and SWEET CHERVIL, is a herbaceous perennial plant belonging to the celery family Apiaceae
Apiaceae
. It is one of two accepted species in the genus MYRRHIS. CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 Description * 3 Distribution and habitat * 4 Cultivation and uses * 5 References ETYMOLOGYThe genus name Myrrhis derives from the Greek word myrrhis , an aromatic oil from Asia. The Latin species name odorata means scented. DESCRIPTION Illustration of Myrrhis odorata Myrrhis odorata is a tall herbaceous perennial plant growing to 2 m tall, depending on circumstances. The leaves are fern-like, 2-4-pinnate, finely divided, feathery, up to 50 cm long, with whitish patches near the rachis. The plant is softly hairy and smells strongly of aniseed when crushed. The flowers are creamy-white, about 2–4 mm across, produced in large umbels
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Osmorhiza
See text OSMORHIZA is a genus of perennial herbs , known generally as SWEET CICELY, SWEETCICELY, or SWEETROOT. Most species are native to North America , but some grow in South America
South America
and Asia
Asia
. Some species are used for medicinal purposes, but have dangerous lookalikes. The seeds of this plant have barbs on the end allowing them to stick to clothing, fur, or feathers. American Indians used the roots of sweet cicely as a panacea; tonic for upset stomach, to ease child birth; the root was poulticed on boils, and wounds; root tea as an eye wash. Folk medicine uses include, an expectorant, tonic for coughs and for stomachaches
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Cicely (other)
CICELY is an herb, Myrrhis odorata CICELY may also refer to: * Osmorhiza
Osmorhiza
, a genus of plants referred to as cicely in North AmericaPEOPLE * Cicely Mary Barker (1895–1973), English illustrator of books, greeting cards, and postcards noted for The Flower Fairies of the Spring * Dame Cicely Courtneidge (1893–1980), English actress, comedian, and Dame Commander of the Ord
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Giardino Botanico Alpino Chanousia
The CHANOUSIA ALPINE BOTANICAL GARDEN (Italian : Giardino Botanico Alpino Chanousia, French : Jardin alpin botanique Chanousia) (about 10,000 m²) is an alpine botanical garden located at 2170 meters altitude near Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
, at the Little St Bernard Pass
Little St Bernard Pass
, in the Italian commune of La Thuile ( Aosta Valley ). It was founded by Valdostan abbot and botanist Pierre Chanoux . It is open daily in the warmer months. The garden was first established in 1897 by Abbot Pierre Chanoux, and in its best years contained about 2500 species of mountain plants from the Alps
Alps
and around the world. It was badly damaged during World War II , and restored starting in 1978. Today the garden contains about 1200 species which flourish in a short growing spell (two months) between heavy winters with snowfall ranging from 4-8 meters
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Taxonomy (biology)
TAXONOMY (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis ), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method ') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank ; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus and species. The Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus is regarded as the father of taxonomy, as he developed a system known as Linnaean taxonomy for categorization of organisms and binomial nomenclature for naming organisms
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Plantae
PLANTS are mainly multicellular , predominantly photosynthetic eukaryotes of the kingdom PLANTAE. The term is today generally limited to the GREEN PLANTS, which form an unranked clade VIRIDIPLANTAE (Latin for "green plants"). This includes the flowering plants , conifers and other gymnosperms , ferns , clubmosses , hornworts , liverworts , mosses and the green algae , and excludes the red and brown algae . Historically, plants formed one of two kingdoms covering all living things that were not animals , and both algae and fungi were treated as plants; however all current definitions of "plant" exclude the fungi and some algae, as well as the prokaryotes (the archaea and bacteria ). Green plants have cell walls containing cellulose and obtain most of their energy from sunlight via photosynthesis by primary chloroplasts , derived from endosymbiosis with cyanobacteria . Their chloroplasts contain chlorophylls a and b, which gives them their green color
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Angiosperms
sweet bay SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION Kingdom: Plantae Subkingdom: Embryophyta (unranked): Spermatophyta (unranked): ANGIOSPERMS GROUPS (APG IV) Basal angiosperms * Amborellales * Nymphaeales
Nymphaeales
* Austrobaileyales Core angiosperms * magnoliids * Chloranthales * monocots * Ceratophyllales * eudicots SYNONYMS * Anthophyta Cronquist * Angiospermae Lindl. * Magnoliophyta Cronquist , Takht. they are distinguished from gymnosperms by characteristics including flowers , endosperm within the seeds, and the production of fruits that contain the seeds. Etymologically, angiosperm means a plant that produces seeds within an enclosure, in other words, a fruiting plant
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Eudicots
The EUDICOTS, EUDICOTIDAE or EUDICOTYLEDONS are a monophyletic clade of flowering plants that had been called TRICOLPATES or NON-MAGNOLIID DICOTS by previous authors. The botanical terms were introduced in 1991 by evolutionary botanist James A. Doyle and paleobotanist Carol L. Hotton to emphasize the later evolutionary divergence of tricolpate dicots from earlier, less specialized, dicots. The close relationships among flowering plants with tricolpate pollen grains was initially seen in morphological studies of shared derived characters . These plants have a distinct trait in their pollen grains of exhibiting three colpi or grooves paralleling the polar axis. Later molecular evidence confirmed the genetic basis for the evolutionary relationships among flowering plants with tricolpate pollen grains and dicotyledonous traits. The term means "true dicotyledons", as it contains the majority of plants that have been considered dicots and have characteristics of the dicots
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Asterids
In the APG IV system (2016) for the classification of flowering plants , the name ASTERIDS denotes a clade (a monophyletic group). Common examples include the forget-me-nots , nightshades (including potatoes , eggplants , tomatoes , peppers and tobacco ), the common sunflower , petunias , morning glory and sweet potato , coffee , lavender , lilac , olive , jasmine , honeysuckle , ash tree , teak , snapdragon , sesame , psyllium , garden sage , and table herbs such as mint , basil , and rosemary . Most of the taxa belonging to this clade had been referred to the Asteridae in the Cronquist system (1981) and to the Sympetalae in earlier systems
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Apiales
The APIALES are an order of flowering plants . The families are those recognized in the APG III system . This is typical of the newer classifications , though there is some slight variation and in particular, the Torriceliaceae may be divided. Under this definition, well-known members include carrots , celery , parsley , and _ Hedera helix _ (English ivy). The order Apiales is placed within the asterid group of eudicots as circumscribed by the APG III system. Within the asterids, Apiales belongs to an unranked group called the campanulids , and within the campanulids, it belongs to a clade known in phylogenetic nomenclature as Apiidae . In 2010, a subclade of Apiidae named Dipsapiidae was defined to consist of the three orders: Apiales, Paracryphiales , and Dipsacales
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Apiaceae
Umbelliferae APIACEAE or UMBELLIFERAE, is a family of mostly aromatic flowering plants named after the type genus _ Apium _ and commonly known as the CELERY, CARROT or PARSLEY FAMILY. It is the 16th-largest family of flowering plants, with more than 3,700 species in 434 genera including such well-known and economically important plants such as angelica , anise , asafoetida , caraway , carrot , celery , chervil , coriander , cumin , dill , fennel , hemlock , lovage , cow parsley , parsley , parsnip , sea holly , giant hogweed and silphium (a plant whose identity is unclear and which may be extinct)
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Philip Miller
PHILIP MILLER FRS (1691 – 18 December 1771) was an English botanist of Scottish descent. Born in Deptford or Greenwich Miller was chief gardener at the Chelsea Physic Garden from 1722 until he was pressured to retire shortly before his death
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Binomial Nomenclature
BINOMIAL NOMENCLATURE (also called BINOMINAL NOMENCLATURE or BINARY NOMENCLATURE) is a formal system of naming species of living things by giving each a name composed of two parts, both of which use Latin grammatical forms , although they can be based on words from other languages. Such a name is called a BINOMIAL NAME (which may be shortened to just "binomial"), a BINOMEN, BINOMINAL NAME or a SCIENTIFIC NAME; more informally it is also called a LATIN NAME. The first part of the name identifies the genus to which the species belongs; the second part identifies the species within the genus. For example, humans belong to the genus _ Homo _ and within this genus to the species _ Homo sapiens _. The _formal_ introduction of this system of naming species is credited to Carl Linnaeus , effectively beginning with his work _ Species Plantarum _ in 1753
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Carl Linnaeus
CARL LINNAEUS (/lɪˈniːəs, lɪˈneɪəs/ ; 23 May 1707 – 10 January 1778), also known after his ennoblement as CARL VON LINNé (Swedish pronunciation: ( listen )), was a Swedish botanist , physician , and zoologist , who formalised the modern system of naming organisms called binomial nomenclature . He is known by the epithet "father of modern taxonomy". Many of his writings were in Latin , and his name is rendered in Latin as CAROLUS LINNæUS (after 1761 CAROLUS A LINNé). Linnaeus was born in the countryside of Småland , in southern Sweden . He received most of his higher education at Uppsala University , and began giving lectures in botany there in 1730. He lived abroad between 1735 and 1738, where he studied and also published a first edition of his _ Systema Naturae _ in the Netherlands. He then returned to Sweden, where he became professor of medicine and botany at Uppsala
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Giovanni Antonio Scopoli
GIOVANNI ANTONIO SCOPOLI (sometimes Latinized as JOHANNES ANTONIUS SCOPOLIUS) (3 June 1723 – 8 May 1788) was an Italian physician and naturalist . His biographer Otto Guglia named him the "first anational European" and the "Linnaeus of the Austrian Empire". CONTENTS * 1 Biography * 2 Works * 3 Some taxa named by Scopoli * 4 Some taxa dedicated to Scopoli * 5 References * 6 External links BIOGRAPHY Scopoli was born at