HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Church Of Saint Sava
The Church of Saint Sava
Saint Sava
(Serbian: Храм светог Саве/Hram svetog Save[a], literal translation into English: "The Temple of Saint Sava") is a Serbian Orthodox
Serbian Orthodox
church located on the Vračar
Vračar
plateau in Belgrade. It is one of the largest Orthodox churches in the world[4] and ranks among the largest church buildings in the world. The church is dedicated to Saint Sava, the founder of the Serbian Orthodox Church and an important figure in medieval Serbia. It is built on the Vračar
Vračar
plateau, on the location where his remains were burned in 1595 by Ottoman Grand Vizier Sinan Pasha
[...More...]

"Church Of Saint Sava" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

St. Sava Church (other)
St. Sava Church, St. Sava Serbian Church, St. Sava Serbian Orthodox Church, Saint Sava Church, or other variations on the name, is a commonly used name for specific churches within the Serbian Orthodox Church. Notable uses of the term may refer to:Contents1 Canada 2 Europe 3 United StatesCanada[edit]Saint Sava Serbian Orthodox Church (Edmonton, Alberta) Saint Sava Serbian Orthodox Parish (Lethbridge, Alberta) Saint Sava Serbian Orthodox Church (Vancouver, British Columbia) Saint Sava Serbian Orthodox Church (Winnipeg, Manitoba) Saint Sava Serbian Orthodox Church (London, Ontario) Saint Sava Serbian Orthodox Church (Toronto, Ontario)Europe[edit]St
[...More...]

"St. Sava Church (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Axis Powers
The Axis powers
Axis powers
(German: Achsenmächte, Italian: Potenze dell'Asse, Japanese: 枢軸国 Sūjikukoku), also known as the Axis and the Rome–Berlin–Tokyo Axis, were the nations that fought in World War II against the Allied forces. The Axis powers
Axis powers
agreed on their opposition to the Allies, but did not completely coordinate their activity. The Axis grew out of the diplomatic efforts of Germany, Italy, and Japan to secure their own specific expansionist interests in the mid-1930s. The first step was the treaty signed by Germany and Italy in October 1936
[...More...]

"Axis Powers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nikolaj Velimirović
Saint
Saint
Nikolai Velimirovich of Ohrid
Ohrid
and Žiča
Žiča
or Nikolaj Velimirović (Serbian Cyrillic: Николај Велимировић; 4 January 1881 [O.S. 23 December 1880] – 18 March [O.S. 5 March] 1956) was bishop of the eparchies of Ohrid
Ohrid
and Žiča (1920-1956) in the Serbian Orthodox Church, an influential theological writer and a highly gifted orator, known as The New Chrysostom.[4] His birth name was Nikola. As a young man, he came close to dying of dysentery, and decided that he would dedicate his life to God if he survived. Survive he did, and was tonsured as a monk under the name Nikolaj. He was ordained into the clergy, and quickly became an important leader and spokesperson for the Serbian Orthodox Church, especially in its relations with the West
[...More...]

"Nikolaj Velimirović" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Danube
The Danube
Danube
or Donau (/ˈdænjuːb/ DAN-yoob, known by various names in other languages) is Europe's second longest river, after the Volga. It is located in Central and Eastern Europe. The Danube
Danube
was once a long-standing frontier of the Roman Empire, and today flows through 10 countries, more than any other river in the world. Originating in Germany, the Danube
Danube
flows southeast for 2,860 km (1,780 mi), passing through or touching the border of Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria, Moldova
Moldova
and Ukraine
Ukraine
before emptying into the Black Sea. Its drainage basin extends into nine more countries
[...More...]

"Danube" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

First Balkan War
Ottoman Empire:[6] 50,000 killed 100,000 wounded 115,000 captured 75,000 dead of disease Total: 340,000 dead, wounded or captured Bulgaria:[7] 8,840 killed 4,926 missing 36,877 wounded 10,995 dead of disease Greece:[8] 2,373 killed in action or died of wounds 9,295 wounded 1,558 dead of disease or accidents (incl. 2nd Balkan
Balkan
war) Serbia: 5,000 killed 18,000 wounded[9] 6,698 dead of disease Montenegro:[6][10] 2,430 killed 6,602 wounded 406 dead of disease Total: at least c
[...More...]

"First Balkan War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Second Balkan War
Bulgarian defeatTreaty of Bucharest Treaty of ConstantinopleBelligerents Bulgaria  Serbia  Romania  Ottoman Empire Greece  MontenegroCommanders and leaders Ferdinand I Mihail Savov Vasil Kutinchev Nikola Ivanov Radko Dimitriev Stiliyan Kovachev Stefan Toshev Nikola Zhekov Petar I of Serbia Radomir Putnik Stepa Stepanović Petar Bojović Carol I of Romania Ferdinand, Crown Prince of Romania Alexandru Averescu Mehmed V Enver Pasha Ahmed Izzet Pasha Constantine I Viktor Dousmanis Pavlos Kountouriotis Nicholas I of Montenegro Danilo, Crown Prince of Montenegro Janko VukotićStrength 500,221–576,878 348,000[1] 330,000[1] 255,000[2] 148,000 12,802[1] Total: 1,093,802Casualties and losses Bulgaria:[3] 7,583 killed 9,694 missing 42,911 wounded 3,049 deceased 140 artillery pieces captured or destroyedTotal: 65,927 dead or wounded Serbia: 50,000 9,000 killed 36,000 wound
[...More...]

"Second Balkan War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
[...More...]

"World War I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cornerstone
The cornerstone (or foundation stone or setting stone) is the first stone set in the construction of a masonry foundation, important since all other stones will be set in reference to this stone, thus determining the position of the entire structure. Over time a cornerstone became a ceremonial masonry stone, or replica, set in a prominent location on the outside of a building, with an inscription on the stone indicating the construction dates of the building and the names of architect, builder, and other significant individuals
[...More...]

"Cornerstone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Serbian Patriarch Gavrilo V
Gavrilo Dožić (Serbian Cyrillic: Гаврило Дожић; 17 May 1881 – 7 May 1950), also known as Gavrilo V, was the Metropolitan of Montenegro
Montenegro
and the Littoral (1920–1938) and the 41st Serbian Patriarch of the Serbian Orthodox Church, from 1938 to 1950.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Bishop 3 Metropolitan 4 Patriarch 5 Detention and imprisonment in World War II 6 Last years 7 References 8 SourcesEarly life[edit] Đorđe Dožić (Ђорђе Дожић) was born on 17 May 1881 in Vrujci, Kolašin, Lower Morača, Montenegro, near Morača Monastery. His family belonged to the Medenica brotherhood.[2] He finished primary school at the monastery, as a pupil of his paternal uncle, archimandrite Mihailo.[2] He went to theological schools in Prizren (Seminary of Prizren) and the Prince Islands
Prince Islands
(Halki seminary)
[...More...]

"Serbian Patriarch Gavrilo V" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Serbian Patriarch
This is a list of the heads of the Serbian Orthodox Church, since the establishment of the church as an autocephalous Archbishopric
Archbishopric
in 1219 to today's Patriarchate. The list includes all the Archbishops and Patriarchs that led the Serbian Orthodox Church
Serbian Orthodox Church
under the Serbian Archbishopric
Archbishopric
and Serbian Patriarchate
Patriarchate
of Peć
[...More...]

"Serbian Patriarch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Civil Engineer
A civil engineer is a person who practices civil engineering – the application of planning, designing, constructing, maintaining, and operating infrastructures while protecting the public and environmental health, as well as improving existing infrastructures that have been neglected. Civil engineering
Civil engineering
is one of the oldest engineering disciplines because it deals with constructed environment[1] including planning, designing, and overseeing construction and maintenance of building structures, and facilities, such as roads, railroads, airports, bridges, harbors, channels, dams, irrigation projects, pipelines, power plants, and water and sewage systems.[2] The term "civil engineer" was established by John Smeaton
John Smeaton
in 1750 to contrast engineers working on civil projects with the military engineers,[3][4] who worked on armaments and defenses
[...More...]

"Civil Engineer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Second World War
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
[...More...]

"Second World War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Invasion Of Yugoslavia
Axis victoryContinuation as a guerrilla warTerritorial changesOccupation of Yugoslavia Partition of Yugoslavia
Yugoslavia
between the Axis Creation of pro-Axis puppet statesBelligerentsAxis Powers  Germany  Italy Hungary YugoslaviaCommanders and leaders Walther von Brauchitsch Maximilian von Weichs Wilhelm List Paul Ludwig Ewald von Kleist Alexander Löhr Wolfram Freiherr von Richthofen Vittorio Ambrosio Alessandro Pirzio Biroli Elemér Gorondy-Novák Dušan Simović Danilo Kalafatović Milorad Petrović Mi
[...More...]

"Invasion Of Yugoslavia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

John I Kantul
Jovan Kantul (Serbian Cyrillic: Јован Кантул, fl. 1592 – d. 1614), sometimes numbered Jovan II was the Archbishop of Peć and Serbian Patriarch, the spiritual leader of the Serbian Orthodox Church, from 1592 until his death in 1614. He planned a major revolt in the Ottoman Balkans, with Grdan, the vojvoda of Nikšić, asking the pope for aid (see Serb Uprising of 1596–97). Owing to his activities for planning a Serbian revolt, he was arrested and put on trial in Istanbul in 1612. He was found guilty of treason and was executed two years later (1614).Contents1 Title 2 References 3 Sources 4 External linksTitle[edit]"Archbishop of Peć and Patriarch of all Serbs and Bulgarians and Western Regions" (Јована м. б. архијепископа пећког и свим Србљем и Бугаром и западним странам патријарха), 20 July 1611.[1]References[edit]^ Ilarion Ruvarac (1888)
[...More...]

"John I Kantul" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Foundation (architecture)
A foundation (or, more commonly, base) is the element of an architectural structure which connects it to the ground, and transfers loads from the structure to the ground. Foundations are generally considered either shallow or deep.[1] Foundation engineering is the application of soil mechanics and rock mechanics (Geotechnical engineering) in the design of foundation elements of structures.Contents1 Historic foundation types1.1 Earthfast or post in ground construction 1.2 Padstones 1.3 Stone foundations 1.4 Rubble trench foundations2 Gallery of shallow foundation types 3 Modern foundation types3.1 Shallow foundations 3.2 Deep foundations3.2.1 Monopile foundation4 Design 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistoric foundation types[edit]The simplest foundation, a padstone
[...More...]

"Foundation (architecture)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.