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Chun Doo-hwan
Chun Jae-yong (son,1959) Chun Hyg-sun (daughter,1962) Chun Jae-guk (son,1964) Chun Jae-man (son,1971)Alma mater Korea Military Academy
Korea Military Academy
(B.S.)Religion Buddhism
Buddhism
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Korean Name
A Korean name
Korean name
consists of a family name followed by a given name, as used by the Korean people
Korean people
in both South Korea
South Korea
and North Korea. In the Korean language, ireum or seongmyeong usually refers to the family name (seong) and given name (ireum in a narrow sense) together. Traditional Korean family names typically consist of only one syllable. There is no middle name in the English language sense. Many Koreans have their given names made of a generational name syllable and an individually distinct syllable, though this practice is declining in the younger generations. The generational name syllable is shared by siblings in North Korea, and by all members of the same generation of an extended family in South Korea. Married men and women usually keep their full personal names, and children inherit the father's family name. The family names are subdivided into bon-gwan (clans), i.e
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Daegu
Kwon Young-jin (권영진)Area • Total 883.48 km2 (341.11 sq mi)Population (October 31, 2014[1]) • Total 2,492,994 • Density 2,800/km2 (7,300/sq mi) • Dialect Gyeongsang ISO 3166 code KR-27Flower MagnoliaTree FirBird EagleGDP US$ 54.5 billion [2]GDP per capita US$ 22,467 [2]Website daegu.go.kr (in English) Daegu
Daegu
(Korean: [tɛ̝.ɡu]), (대구, 大邱, literally 'large hill') formerly spelled Taegu[a] and officially known as the Daegu Metropolitan City, is a city in South Korea, the fourth largest after Seoul, Busan, and Incheon, and the third largest metropolitan area in the nation[b] with over 2.5 million residents
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Hanja
Hanja
Hanja
(Hangul: 한자; Hanja: 漢字; Korean pronunciation: [ha(ː)nt͈ɕa]) is the Korean name
Korean name
for Chinese characters (Chinese: 漢字; pinyin: hànzì).[1] More specifically, it refers to those Chinese characters
Chinese characters
borrowed from Chinese and incorporated into the Korean language
Korean language
with Korean pronunciation. Hanja-mal or Hanja-eo (the latter is more used) refers to words that can be written with Hanja, and hanmun (한문, 漢文) refers to Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
writing, although "Hanja" is sometimes used loosely to encompass these other concepts. Because Hanja
Hanja
never underwent major reform, they are almost entirely identical to traditional Chinese and kyūjitai characters, though the stroke orders for some characters are slightly different
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Revised Romanization Of Korean
The Revised Romanization of Korean
Romanization of Korean
(국어의 로마자 표기법; gugeoui romaja pyogibeop. op; lit. "Roman-letter notation of the national language") is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea
South Korea
proclaimed by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism to replace the older McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
system. The new system eliminates diacritics in favor of digraphs and adheres more closely to Korean phonology than to a suggestive rendition of Korean phonetics for non-native speakers. The Revised Romanization limits itself to the ISO basic Latin alphabet, apart from limited, often optional use of the hyphen. It was developed by the National Academy of the Korean Language from 1995 and was released to the public on 7 July 2000 by South Korea's Ministry of Culture and Tourism in Proclamation No
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List Of Korean Family Names
This is a list of Korean family names, in Hangul
Hangul
alphabetical order. Note: (S) denotes South Korea. (N) denotes North Korea. The most common Korean family name (particularly in South Korea) is Kim, followed by Lee and Park. These three family names are held by around half of the ethnic Korean population
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Art Name
A pseudonym or pen name, also known by its native names hao (in China) (Chinese: 号), gō (in Japan) and ho (in Korea), is a professional name used by East Asian
East Asian
artists. The word and the concept originated in China, then became popular in other East Asian
East Asian
countries (especially in Japan, Korea, Vietnam
Vietnam
and the former Kingdom of Ryukyu). In some cases, artists adopted different pseudonyms at different stages of their career, usually to mark significant changes in their life
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Courtesy Name
A courtesy name (Chinese: 字, zi), also known as a style name,[1] is a name bestowed upon one at adulthood in addition to one's given name.[2] This practice is a tradition in East Asian cultures, including China, Japan, Korea
Korea
and Vietnam.[3] Formerly in China, the zi would replace a male's given name when he turned twenty, as a symbol of adulthood and respect.[citation needed] It could be given either by the parents or by the first personal teacher on the first day of family school. Females might substitute their given name for a zi upon marriage
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Gyeongsangnam-do
South Gyeongsang
Gyeongsang
Province (Korean: 경상남도, translit. Gyeongsangnam-do, Korean pronunciation: [kjʌŋ.saŋ.nam.do]) is a province in the southeast of South Korea. The provincial capital is at Changwon. It is adjacent to the major metropolitan center and port of Busan. There is UNESCO World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
Haeinsa, a Buddhist temple that houses the Tripitaka Koreana
Tripitaka Koreana
and attracts many tourists
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Kempeitai
The Kenpeitai
Kenpeitai
(憲兵隊, " Military
Military
Police Corps") /kɛmpeɪˈtaɪ/ was the military police arm of the Imperial Japanese Army
Imperial Japanese Army
from 1881 to 1945. It was both a conventional military police and a secret police force. While it was institutionally part of the Imperial Japanese Army, it also discharged the functions of the military police for the Imperial Japanese Navy under the direction of the Admiralty Minister (although the IJN had its own much smaller Tokkeitai), those of the executive police under the direction of the Interior Minister, and those of the judicial police under the direction of the Justice Minister
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Vietnam War
North Vietnamese victoryWithdrawal of American-led forces from Indochina Communist governments take power in South Vietnam, Cambodia
Cambodia
and Laos South Vietnam
South Vietnam
is annexed by North VietnamTerritorial changes Reunification of North and
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Guerilla Tactics
Guerrilla warfare is a form of irregular warfare in which a small group of combatants, such as paramilitary personnel, armed civilians, or irregulars, use military tactics including ambushes, sabotage, raids, petty warfare, hit-and-run tactics, and mobility to fight a larger and less-mobile traditional military.[1] Guerrilla groups are a type of violent non-state actor.Contents1 Etymology 2 Strategy, tactics and methods2.1 Strategy 2.2 Tactics 2.3 Unconventional methods 2.4 Growth during the 20th century3 History 4 Counter-guerrilla warfare4.1 Scholarship4.1.1 Classic guidelines 4.1.2 Variants5 Foco theory 6 Relationship to terrorism 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEtymology[edit] The Spanish word "guerrilla" is the diminutive form of "guerra" ("war"). The term became popular during the early-19th century Peninsular War, when the Spanish people rose against the Napoleonic troops and fought against a highly superior army using the guerrilla strategy
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Psychological Warfare
Psychological
Psychological
warfare (PSYWAR), or the basic aspects of modern psychological operations (PSYOP), have been known by many other names or terms, including MISO, Psy Ops, political warfare, "Hearts and Minds", and propaganda.[1] The term is used "to denote any action which is practiced mainly by psychological methods with the aim of evoking a planned psychological reaction in other people".[2] Various techniques are used, and are aimed at influencing a target audience's value system, belief system, emotions, motives, reasoning, or behavior. It is used to induce confessions or reinforce attitudes and behaviors favorable to the originator's objectives, and are sometimes combined with black operations or false flag tactics. It is also used to destroy the morale of enemies through tactics that aim to depress troops' psychological states.[3][4] Target audiences can be governments, organizations, groups, and individuals, and is not just limited to soldiers
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Republic Of Korea Army Special Warfare Command
Unconventional warfare such as:Direct action Special reconnaissance Information operations Assassination Guerrilla warfare Hostage rescue Counter-terrorism Demolition Fire supportSize 10,000[1]Part of Republic of Korea Army HeadquartersGarrison/HQ Icheon, Gyeonggi ProvinceNickname(s) "Black Berets", "R.O.K SF"Motto(s) 안 되면 되게 하라 (English: Make Impossible Possible) 귀신 같이 접근하여, 번개 같이 타격하고, 연기 같이 사라져라 (English: Approach like a Ghost, Strike like Thunder, Vanish like Smoke)Engagements Vietnam War Operation Enduring Freedom Iraq WarRepublic of Korea Army Special Warfare Command (ROK-SWC; Korean: 대한민국 육군 특수전사령부 or 특전사; Hanja: 大韓民國陸軍 特殊戰司令部), also known as the Republic of Korea Army Special Forces "Black Berets"(R.O.K-Special Forces) is the military command of the Republic of Korea Army responsible for their special operation forces
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Presidential Security Service
대통령경호처 Daetongryeong Gyeonghocheo yom Taet'ongryŏng K'yŏnghochŏAgency overviewFormed 1963Superseding agencyKyong Mu Dae Presidential Security Police (First) Blue House Presidential Police (Second)Jurisdiction Government of South KoreaHeadquarters Near Blue HouseAgency executivesJu Young-hoon, Head Lee Young-seok, Vice HeadWebsite Official SitePresidential Security Service (대통령경호처), or PSS for short, is a South Korean close protection agency
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