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Chrysobalanus Icaco
Chrysobalanus
Chrysobalanus
icaco, the cocoplum, paradise plum, abajeru or icaco, is found near sea beaches and inland throughout tropical Africa, tropical Americas and the Caribbean, and in southern Florida
Florida
and the Bahamas.[1] It is also found as an exotic species on other tropical islands, where it has become a problematic invasive.[2] Although taxonomists disagree on whether Chrysobalanus
Chrysobalanus
icaco has multiple subspecies or varieties, it is recognized as having two ecotypes, described as an inland, much less salt-tolerant, and more upright C. icaco var. pellocarpus and a coastal C. icaco var. icaco.[3][4] Both the ripe fruit of C
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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Encyclopedia Of Life
The Encyclopedia of Life
Life
(EOL) is a free, online collaborative encyclopedia intended to document all of the 1.9 million living species known to science. It is compiled from existing databases and from contributions by experts and non-experts throughout the world.[2] It aims to build one "infinitely expandable" page for each species, including video, sound, images, graphics, as well as text.[3] In addition, the Encyclopedia incorporates content from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, which digitizes millions of pages of printed literature from the world's major natural history libraries. The project was initially backed by a US$50 million funding commitment, led by the MacArthur Foundation
MacArthur Foundation
and the Sloan Foundation, who provided US$20 million and US$5 million, respectively
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Guyana
Coordinates: 5°00′N 58°45′W / 5°N 58.75°W / 5; -58.75Co-operative Republic
Republic
of GuyanaFlagCoat of armsMotto: "One People, One Nation, One Destiny"Anthem: Dear Land of Guyana, of Rivers and PlainsLocation of  Guyana  (dark green) in South America  (grey)Capital and largest city Georgetown 6°46′N 58°10′W / 6.767°N 58.167°W / 6.767; -58.167Official languages EnglishRecognised regional languages9 languagesAkawaio Macushi Waiwai Arawak Patamona War
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Ornamental Plant
Ornamental plants are plants that are grown for decorative purposes in gardens and landscape design projects, as houseplants, for cut flowers and specimen display. The cultivation of these, called floriculture, forms a major branch of horticulture.Contents1 Garden
Garden
plants 2 Trees 3 Grasses 4 Cultivation 5 The term 6 References 7 External links Garden
Garden
plants[edit] Commonly, ornamental [garden] plants are grown for the display of aesthetic features including: flowers, leaves, scent, overall foliage texture, fruit, stem and bark, and aesthetic form. In some cases, unusual features may be considered to be of interest, such as the prominent thorns of Rosa sericea
Rosa sericea
and cacti
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Alkaline
In chemistry, an alkali (/ˈælkəlaɪ/; from Arabic: al-qaly “ashes of the saltwort”) is a basic, ionic salt of an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal chemical element. An alkali also can be defined as a base that dissolves in water. A solution of a soluble base has a pH greater than 7.0. The adjective alkaline is commonly, and alkalescent less often, used in English as a synonym for basic, especially for bases soluble in water
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PH
In chemistry, pH (/piːˈeɪtʃ/) (potential of hydrogen) is a numeric scale used to specify the acidity or basicity of an aqueous solution. It is approximately the negative of the base 10 logarithm of the molar concentration, measured in units of moles per liter, of hydrogen ions. More precisely it is the negative of the base 10 logarithm of the activity of the hydrogen ion.[1] Solutions with a pH less than 7 are acidic and solutions with a pH greater than 7 are basic
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Cultivars
The term cultivar[nb 1] most commonly refers to an assemblage of plants selected for desirable characters that are maintained during propagation. More generally, cultivar refers to the most basic classification category of cultivated plants in the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants (ICNCP). Most cultivars arose in cultivation, but a few are special selections from the wild. Popular ornamental garden plants like roses, camellias, daffodils, rhododendrons, and azaleas are cultivars produced by careful breeding and selection for floral colour and form. Similarly, the world's agricultural food crops are almost exclusively cultivars that have been selected for characters such as improved yield, flavour, and resistance to disease, and very few wild plants are now used as food sources
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Hedge
A hedge or hedgerow is a line of closely spaced shrubs and sometimes trees, planted and trained to form a barrier or to mark the boundary of an area, such as between neighbouring properties. Hedges used to separate a road from adjoining fields or one field from another, and of sufficient age to incorporate larger trees, are known as hedgerows. Often they serve as windbreaks to improve conditions for the adjacent crops, as in bocage country
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Halophyte
A halophyte is a plant that grows in waters of high salinity, coming into contact with saline water through its roots or by salt spray, such as in saline semi-deserts, mangrove swamps, marshes and sloughs and seashores. The word derives from Ancient Greek ἅλας (halas) 'salt' and φυτόν (phyton) 'plant'. An example of a halophyte is the salt marsh grass Spartina alterniflora
Spartina alterniflora
(smooth cordgrass). Relatively few plant species are halophytes—perhaps only 2% of all plant species. The large majority of plant species are glycophytes, which are not salt-tolerant and are damaged fairly easily by high salinity.[1]Contents1 Classification 2 Salt tolerance 3 Examples 4 As biofuel 5 ReferencesClassification[edit] Halophytes can be classified in many ways. According to Stocker (1933), it is mainly of 3 kinds, viz. 1
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Erosion
In earth science, erosion is the action of surface processes (such as water flow or wind) that removes soil, rock, or dissolved material from one location on the Earth's crust, and then transport it away to another location[1] (not to be confused with weathering which involves no movement). This natural process is caused by the dynamic activity of erosive agents, that is, water, ice (glaciers), snow, air (wind), plants, animals, and humans. In accordance with these agents, erosion is sometimes divided into water erosion, glacial erosion, snow erosion, wind (aeolic) erosion, zoogenic erosion, and anthropogenic erosion[2].The particulate breakdown of rock or soil into clastic sediment is referred to as physical or mechanical erosion; this contrasts with chemical erosion, where soil or rock material is removed from an area by its dissolving into a solvent (typically water), followed by the flow away of that solution
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Oleta River State Park
The Oleta River
Oleta River
State Park is a 1,043-acre (4.22 km2) Florida State Park on Biscayne Bay
Biscayne Bay
in the municipal suburb of North Miami
Miami
in metropolitan Miami, Florida. Adjoining the Biscayne Bay
Biscayne Bay
Campus of Florida
Florida
International University, the park contains one of the largest concentrations of Casuarina
Casuarina
trees (Australian 'pine'), an invasive species in the state park system.Contents1 Facilities 2 Health concerns 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 External links 6 ReferencesFacilities[edit] The central feature of this park is the mouth of the Oleta River, for which it is named. The river has drawn human inhabitants to the area since about 500 B.C, when its shores served as a campground for Tequesta Indians. It was used by U.S
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Wikidata
Wikidata
Wikidata
is a collaboratively edited knowledge base hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. It is intended to provide a common source of data which can be used by Wikimedia projects such as,[4][5] and by anyone else, under a public domain license. This is similar to the way Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
provides storage for media files and access to those files for all Wikimedia projects, and which are also freely available for reuse. Wikidata
Wikidata
is powered by the software Wikibase.[6]Contents1 Concepts 2 Development history2.1 Phase 1 2.2 Phase 2 2.3 Phase 33 Reception 4 Logo 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksConcepts[edit]ScreenshotsThree statements from Wikidata's item on the planet Mars
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EPPO Code
An EPPO code, formerly known as a Bayer code, is an encoded identifier that is used by the European and Mediterranean Plant
Plant
Protection Organization (EPPO), in a system designed to uniquely identify organisms – namely plants, pests and pathogens – that are important to agriculture and crop protection. EPPO codes are a core component of a database of names, both scientific and vernacular. Although originally started by the Bayer Corporation, the official list of codes is now maintained by EPPO.[1]Contents1 EPPO code database1.1 Example2 External links 3 ReferencesEPPO code database[edit] All codes and their associated names are included in a database (EPPO Global Database). In total, there are over 68,500 species listed in the EPPO database, including:[2]36,000 species of plants (e.g. cultivated, wild plants and weeds) 24,000 species of animals (e.g. insects, mites, nematodes, rodents), biocontrol agents 8,500 microorganism species (e.g
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Barbados
Coordinates: 13°10′N 59°33′W / 13.167°N 59.550°W / 13.167; -59.550BarbadosFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Pride and Industry"Anthem: In Plenty and In Time of NeedRoyal anthem: God Save the QueenCapital and largest city Bridgetown 13°06′N 59°37′W / 13.100°N 59.617°W / 13.100; -59.617Official languages EnglishRecognised regional languages Bajan CreoleEthnic groups (2010[1])90.4% Black 4.1% Multiracial 3.7% White 1.3% Indian 0.4% other/unspecifiedReligion74.6% Christian 4.8% other 20.6% none/unspecified[1]DemonymBarbadian Bajan (colloquial)Government Unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy• MonarchElizabeth II• Governor-GeneralDame Sandra Mason• Prime MinisterFreundel StuartLegislature Parliament• Upper houseSenate•
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Flora Of North America
The Flora of North America
North America
North of Mexico
Mexico
(usually referred to as FNA) is a multivolume work describing the native plants of North America. Much of the Flora is already available online.[1] It is expected to fill 30 volumes when completed, and will be the first work to treat all of the known flora north of Mexico. It is a collaboration of over 800 authors, who collaborate over the web.[2] References[edit]^ "Flora of North America". eFloras.org. Retrieved 2012-11-05.  ^ Tomlinson, K.L.; Sanchez, J.A.; Spasser, M.A.; Schnase, J.L. (1998), Managing cognitive overload in the Flora of North America
North America
project, 2, p. 296, doi:10.1109/HICSS.1998.651712 External links[edit]Flora of North America
North America
— HomepageThis article about a book on botany or plants is a stub
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