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Chryses
In Greek mythology, Chryses
Chryses
(/ˈkraɪsiːz/; Greek: Χρύσης Khrúsēs) was a Trojan priest of Apollo
Apollo
at Chryse, near the city of Troy. According to a tradition mentioned by Eustathius of Thessalonica, Chryses
Chryses
and Briseus (father of Briseis) were brothers, sons of a man named Ardys (otherwise unknown). During the Trojan War
Trojan War
(prior to the actions described in Homer's Iliad), Agamemnon
Agamemnon
took Chryses' daughter Chryseis
Chryseis
(Astynome) from Moesia as a war prize and when Chryses
Chryses
attempted to ransom her, refused to return her
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Eurypylus
In Greek mythology, Eurypylus /jʊəˈrɪpɪləs/ (Ancient Greek: Εὐρύπυλος Eurypylos) was the name of several different people:Eurypylus, was a Thessalian king, son of Euaemon and Ops. He was a former suitor of Helen thus he led the Thessalians during Trojan War.[1] Eurypylus, was son of Telephus
Telephus
and Astyoche.[2] Eurypylus, son of Poseidon
Poseidon
and king of Cos.[3] Eurypylus, another son of Poseidon
Poseidon
by the Pleiad Celaeno. He ruled over the Fortunate Islands.[4] Eurypylus, a son of Heracles
Heracles
and Eubote, daughter of Thespius.[5] Eurypylus, a son of Thestius
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Troy
Troy
Troy
(Ancient Greek: Τροία, Troia or Τροίας, Troias and Ἴλιον, Ilion or Ἴλιος, Ilios; Latin: Troia and Ilium;[note 1] Hittite: Wilusha or Truwisha;[1][2] Turkish: Truva or Troya) was a city situated in the far northwest of the region known in late Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
as Asia Minor, now known as Anatolia
Anatolia
in modern Turkey, near (just south of) the southwest mouth of the Dardanelles strait and northwest of Mount Ida. The present-day location is known as Hisarlik. It was the setting of the Trojan War
Trojan War
described in the Greek Epic Cycle, in particular in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer
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Bibliotheca (Pseudo-Apollodorus)
The Bibliotheca (Ancient Greek: Βιβλιοθήκη Bibliothēkē, "Library"), also known as the Bibliotheca of Pseudo-Apollodorus, is a compendium of Greek myths and heroic legends, arranged in three books, generally dated to the first or second century AD.[1] The author was traditionally thought to be Apollodorus of Athens, but that attribution is now regarded as false, and so "Pseudo-" was added to Apollodorus. The Bibliotheca has been called "the most valuable mythographical work that has come down from ancient times".[2] An epigram recorded by the important intellectual Patriarch Photius I of Constantinople
Patriarch Photius I of Constantinople
expressed its purpose:It has the following not ungraceful epigram: 'Draw your knowledge of the past from me and read the ancient tales of learned lore. Look neither at the page of Homer, nor of elegy, nor tragic muse, nor epic strain
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Acamas
Acamas or Akamas
Akamas
(/ɑːˈkɑːmɑːs/; Ancient Greek: Ἀκάμας, folk etymology: "unwearying") was a name attributed to several characters in Greek mythology. The following three all fought in the Trojan War, and only the first was not mentioned by Homer.Acamas, son of Theseus, mentioned by Virgil
Virgil
as being in the Trojan horse. Acamas, son of Eussorus, from Thrace. With his comrade Peiros, son of Imbrasus, Acamas led a contingent of Thracian warriors to the Trojan War.[1] He was killed by Ajax.[2] Acamas, son of Antenor, fought on the side of the Trojans and killed one Greek.[3] Acamas, one of the suitors of Penelope.[4] Acamas, one of the Thebans who laid an ambush for Tydeus
Tydeus
when he returned from Thebes. He was killed by Tydeus.[5] Acamas, an Aetolian in the army of the Seven Against Thebes.[6] Acamas, one of Actaeon's dogs.[7]References[edit]^ Homer
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Orestes
In Greek mythology, Orestes
Orestes
(/ɒˈrɛstiːz/; Greek: Ὀρέστης [oréstɛːs]) was the son of Clytemnestra
Clytemnestra
and Agamemnon
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Eurydamas
In Greek mythology, the name Eurydamas[pronunciation?] (Ancient Greek: Εὐρυδάμας) may refer to:Eurydamas, son of Pelias
Pelias
(not the same as Pelias
Pelias
of Iolcus). He fought in the Trojan War
Trojan War
and was one of those who hid in the Trojan Horse.[1][2] Eurydamas, son-in-law of Antenor. Was killed by Diomedes.[3] Eurydamas, an elder of Troy, interpreter of dreams
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Ialmenus
In Greek mythology, Ialmenus[pronunciation?] was a son of Ares
Ares
and Astyoche, and twin brother of Ascalaphus. Together with his brother, he sailed with the Argonauts, was among the suitors of Helen[1] and led the Orchomenian contingent in the Trojan War.[2][3] Unlike Ascalaphus, Ialmenus survived the war. He was said to have ended up in Colchis, where he founded a colony, the inhabitants of which were later referred to as the "Achaeans of Pontus".[4] References[edit]^ Bibliotheca 1. 9. 16. & 3. 10. 8 ^ Homer, Iliad, 2. 512 ff ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9. 37. 7 ^ Strabo, Geography, 9. 2. 42This article relating to Greek mythology
Greek mythology
is a stub
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Euryalus
Euryalus (/jʊəˈraɪ.ələs/; Ancient Greek: Εὐρύαλος) refers to the Euryalus fortress, the main citadel of Ancient Syracuse, and to several different characters from Greek mythology
Greek mythology
and classical literature:Euryalus, named on sixth and fifth century BC pottery as being one the Giants who fought the Olympian gods
Olympian gods
in the Gigantomachy.[1] Euryalus, a suitor of Hippodamia
Hippodamia
who, like all the suitors before Pelops, was killed by Oenomaus.[2] Euryalus, one of the eight sons of Melas, who plotted against their uncle Oeneus
Oeneus
and were slain by Tydeus.[3] Euryalus was the son of Mecisteus and one of the Argonauts. He attacked the city of Thebes as one of the Epigoni, who took the city and avenged the deaths of their fathers, who had also attempted to invade Thebes
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Eustathius Of Thessalonica
Eustathius of Thessalonica
Eustathius of Thessalonica
(or Eustathios of Thessalonike; Greek: Εὐστάθιος Θεσσαλονίκης; c. 1115 – 1195/6) was a Greek scholar and Archbishop of Thessalonica. He is most noted for his contemporary account of the sack of Thessalonica by the Normans
Normans
in 1185, for his orations and for his commentaries on Homer, which incorporate many remarks by much earlier researchers. He was officially canonized on June 10, 1988, and his feast day is on September 20.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Citations 4 References 5 Sources 6 Further reading 7 External linksLife[edit] A pupil of Nicholas Kataphloron, Eustathius was appointed to the offices of superintendent of petitions (ἐπὶ τῶν δεήσεων, epi ton deeseon), professor of rhetoric (μαΐστωρ ῥητόρων), and was ordained a deacon in Constantinople. He was ordained bishop of Myra
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά elliniká) is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece, Cyprus
Cyprus
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea. It has the longest documented history of any living Indo-European language, spanning more than 3000 years of written records.[3] Its writing system has been the
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Greek Mythology
Greek mythology
Greek mythology
is the body of myths originally told by the ancient Greeks. These stories concern the origin and the nature of the world, the lives and activities of deities, heroes, and mythological creatures, and the origins and significance of the ancient Greeks' own cult and ritual practices. Modern scholars study the myths in an attempt to shed light on the religious and political institutions of ancient Greece and its civilization, and to gain understanding of the nature of myth-making itself.[1] The Greek myths were initially propagated in an oral-poetic tradition most likely by Minoan and Mycenaean singers starting in the 18th century BC;[2] eventually the myths of the heroes of the Trojan War
Trojan War
and its aftermath became part of the oral tradition of Homer's epic poems, the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey
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Louvre
8.1 million (2017)Ranked 1st nationally Ranked 1st globallyDirector Jean-Luc MartinezCurator Marie-Laure de RochebrunePublic transit accessPalais Royal – Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
Louvre-Rivoli Website www.louvre.frThe Louvre
Louvre
(US: /ˈluːv(rə)/),[1] or the Louvre
Louvre
Museum (French: Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
[myze dy luvʁ] ( listen)), is the world's largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine
Seine
in the city's 1st arrondissement (district or ward)
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Krater
A krater or crater (Greek: κρατήρ, kratēr, lit. "mixing vessel") was a large vase in Ancient Greece, particularly used for watering down wine.Contents1 Form and function 2 Usage 3 Wine
Wine
dilution 4 Forms of kraters4.1 Column krater 4.2 Calyx krater 4.3 Volute
Volute
krater 4.4 Bell krater5 Metal kraters 6 Ornamental stone kraters 7 ReferencesForm and function[edit] Further information: Ancient Greek vase painting
Ancient Greek vase painting
and Pottery of ancient Greece At a Greek symposium, kraters were placed in the center of the room. They were quite large, so they were not easily portable when filled. Thus, the wine-water mixture would be withdrawn from the krater with other vessels, such as a kyathos (pl. kyathoi), an amphora (pl. amphorai)[1], or a kylix (pl. kylikes)[1]
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Apulia
Coordinates: 41°0′31″N 16°30′46″E / 41.00861°N 16.51278°E / 41.00861; 16.51278Apulia PugliaRegion of ItalyFlagCoat of armsCountry ItalyCapital BariGovernment • President Michele Emiliano (PD)Area • Total 19,358 km2 (7,474 sq mi)Population (31-12-2016) • Total 4,063,888 • Density 210/km2 (540/sq mi)Demonym(s) English: Apulian(s), Puglian(s) Italian: Pugliese, pl
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Hyginus
Gaius Julius Hyginus (/hɪˈdʒaɪnəs/; c. 64 BC – AD 17) was a Latin
Latin
author, a pupil of the famous Cornelius Alexander Polyhistor, and a freedman of Caesar Augustus. He was elected superintendent of the Palatine library by Augustus
Augustus
according to Suetonius' De Grammaticis, 20.[1] It is not clear whether Hyginus was a native of the Iberian Peninsula
Iberian Peninsula
or of Alexandria. Suetonius remarks that he fell into great poverty in his old age, and was supported by the historian Clodius Licinus. Hyginus was a voluminous author: his works included topographical and biographical treatises, commentaries on Helvius Cinna and the poems of Virgil, and disquisitions on agriculture and bee-keeping
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