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Christopher Morgan (politician)
Christopher Morgan (June 4, 1808 – April 3, 1877) was a U.S. Representative from New York. Born in Aurora, New York, Morgan pursued classical studies and was graduated from Yale College
Yale College
in 1830. He began to study law with an attorney in Aurora, and completed his studies with Elijah Miller and William H. Seward
William H. Seward
in Auburn. Morgan was then admitted to the bar, and commenced practice in Aurora. Morgan was elected as a Whig to the Twenty-sixth and Twenty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1839 – March 3, 1843). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1842 to the Twenty-eighth Congress. He moved to Auburn in 1843 and practiced law with Seward and Samuel Blatchford as Morgan, Blatchford & Seward from 1844-1847
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United States House Of Representatives
Majority (238)     Republican (238)Minority (193)     Democratic (193)Vacant (4)     Vacant (4)Length of termTwo yearsElectionsVoting systemFirst-past-the-post in most states; nonpartisan blanket primary with a majoritarian second round in 3 statesLast electionNovember 8, 2016Next electionNovember 6, 2018Redistricting State legislatures or redistricting commissions, varies by stateMeeting placeHouse of Representatives chamber United States
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28th United States Congress
The Twenty-eighth United States
United States
Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States
United States
federal government, consisting of the United States Senate
United States Senate
and the United States
United States
House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
from March 4, 1843, to March 4, 1845, during the third and fourth years of John Tyler's presidency. The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the Sixth Census of the United States
United States
in 1840
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Aurora, Cayuga County, New York
Aurora, or Aurora-on-Cayuga, is a village and college town in the town of Ledyard, Cayuga County, New York, United States, on the shore of Cayuga Lake. The village had a population of 724 at the 2010 census.[2] Wells College, an institution of higher education for women founded by Henry Wells
Henry Wells
in 1868, is located in Aurora. It became coeducational in 2005, and since then enrollment has risen. In 1980, its Aurora Village- Wells College
Wells College
Historic District, with more than 50 contributing properties, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places
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Find A Grave
Find A Grave is a website that allows the public to search and add to an online database of cemetery records. It is owned by Ancestry.com. It receives and uploads digital photographs of headstones from burial sites, taken by unpaid volunteers at cemeteries
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Biographical Directory Of The United States Congress
The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress
United States Congress
is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress
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Utica, New York
 New YorkMetro Utica–RomeCounty Oneida Land grant
Land grant
(village) January 2, 1734[3]Incorporated (village) April 3, 1798[4]Incorporated (city) February 13, 1832[5]Government • Type Mayor-council • Mayor Robert M
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Republican Party (United States)
The Republican Party, commonly referred to as the GOP (abbreviation for Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other being its historic rival, the Democratic Party. The party is named after republicanism, the dominant value during the American Revolution. Founded by anti-slavery activists, economic modernizers, ex Whigs and ex Free Soilers in 1854, the Republicans dominated politics nationally and in the majority of northern states for most of the period between 1860 and 1932.[16] The Republican Party originally championed classical liberal ideas, including anti-slavery and economic reforms.[17][18] The party was usually dominant over the Democrats during the Third Party System
Third Party System
and Fourth Party System. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
formed the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party after being rejected by the GOP and ran as a candidate
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Cravath
Cravath is a surname. Notable people with the surname include: Erastus Milo Cravath (1833–1900), American religious leader and educator Gavvy Cravath
Gavvy Cravath
(1881–1963), American baseball player Paul Drennan Cravath
Paul Drennan Cravath
(1861–1940), American lawyer, co-founder of Cravath, Swaine & Moore Prosper Cravath
Prosper Cravath
(1809–1886), American farmer and lawyer Ruth Cravath
Ruth Cravath
(1902–1986), American stonework artistThis page lists people with the surname Cravath
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Samuel Blatchford
Samuel M. Blatchford (March 9, 1820 – July 7, 1893) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States
United States
from April 3, 1882 until his death.Contents1 Early life 2 Legal career 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Samuel Blatchford
Samuel Blatchford
was born in Auburn, New York. His father, Richard Milford Blatchford (1798–1875), was a well known attorney and friend of Daniel Webster.[1] He served as a New York State Assemblyman in 1855, U.S. Minister to the Papal States (1862–1863),[2] and New York City
New York City
Park Commissioner in 1872.[3] His grandfather, also named Samuel Blatchford, was born in England and was the first president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
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Whig Party (United States)
The Whig Party was a political party active in the middle of the 19th century in the United States. Four United States
United States
Presidents belonged to the party while in office.[5] It emerged in the 1830s as the leading opponent of Jacksonians, pulling together former members of the National Republican (one of the successors of the Democratic-Republican Party) and the Anti-Masonic Party. It had links to the upscale traditions of the Federalist Party. Along with the rival Democratic Party, it was central to the Second Party System
Second Party System
from the early 1840s to the mid-1860s.[6] It originally formed in opposition to the policies of President Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson
(in office 1829–1837) and his Democratic Party
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Admission To The Bar In The United States
Admission to the bar in the United States
Admission to the bar in the United States
is the granting of permission by a particular court system to a lawyer to practice law in that system. Each U.S state and similar jurisdiction (e.g., territories under federal control) has its own court system and sets its own rules for bar admission (or privilege to practice law), which can lead to different admission standards among states. In most cases, a person who is "admitted" to the bar is thereby a "member" of the particular bar. In the canonical case, lawyers seeking admission must earn a Juris Doctor degree from a law school approved by the jurisdiction, and then pass a bar exam administered by it. Typically, there is also a character and fitness evaluation, which includes a background check. However, there are exceptions to each of these requirements. A lawyer who is admitted in one state is not automatically allowed to practice in any other
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Auburn, New York
Auburn is a city in Cayuga County, New York, United States, located at the north end of Owasco Lake, one of the Finger Lakes, in Central New York. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 27,687.[4] It is the county seat of Cayuga County,[5] and the site of the maximum-security Auburn Correctional Facility, as well as the William H
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William H. Seward
William Henry Seward (May 16, 1801 – October 10, 1872) was United States Secretary of State from 1861 to 1869, and earlier served as Governor of New York
Governor of New York
and United States Senator. A determined opponent of the spread of slavery in the years leading up to the American Civil War, he was a dominant figure in the Republican Party in its formative years, and was praised for his work on behalf of the Union as Secretary of State during the American Civil War. Seward was born in southeastern New York, where his father was a farmer and owned slaves. He was educated as a lawyer and moved to the Central New York
Central New York
town of Auburn. Seward was elected to the New York State Senate in 1830 as an Anti-Mason. Four years later, he became the gubernatorial nominee of the Whig Party. Though he was not successful in that race, Seward was elected governor in 1838 and won a second two-year term in 1840
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Elijah Miller
Elijah Miller (April 11, 1772 - November 13, 1851) was a lawyer and judge in Auburn, New York. His daughter, Frances Adeline Miller Seward, married future U.S. Secretary of State
U.S. Secretary of State
William H. Seward
William H. Seward
in 1824. Seward was a junior partner in Miller's law practice.[1] Miller granted permission for Seward to marry his daughter under the condition that they live in his South Street home with him.[2] References[edit]^ "William H. Seward: Biography and Much More from Answers.com". Answers.com. Retrieved July 8, 2007.  ^ "Seward House -- Biography". Seward House. Archived from the original on February 15, 2009. Retrieved July 8, 2007. Works[edit]Doris Kearns Goodwin. Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln (2005) ISBN 0-684-82490-6This New York–related article is a stub
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Yale College
Yale College
Yale College
is the undergraduate liberal arts college of Yale University. Founded in 1701, it is the original school of the university. Although other schools of the university were founded as early as 1810, all of Yale was officially known as Yale College
Yale College
until 1887, when its schools were confederated and the institution was renamed Yale University. Originally established to train Congregationalist ministers, the college began teaching humanities and natural sciences by the late 18th century. At the same time, students began organizing extracurricular organizations, first literary societies, and later publications, sports teams, and singing groups. By the mid-19th century, it was the largest college in the United States. In 1847, it was joined by another undergraduate degree-granting school at Yale, the Sheffield Scientific School, which was absorbed into the college in the mid-20th century
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