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Chrislam (Yoruba)
Orishas/IrunmoleElegua Eshu Ogun Oshosi Osun Ori Orunmila Obatala Shango Aganju Yemoja Oshun Oya Oba Osanyin Babalu Aye Olokun Orisha Oko Erinle Oshunmare IbejiVariants Yoruba religion
Yoruba religion
(Nigeria) Santería
Santería
(Cuba) Candomblé Ketu
Candomblé Ketu
(Brazil) Spiritual Baptist (Trinidad) Oyotunji (United States)TopicsMedicine Music Itan Art Ogboni Gelede Egungun Babalawo Calendar Letra del año AsheSacred sitesIle Ife Oyo Osun-Osogbo YorubalandLegendary figuresOduduwa Oranyan Moremi Ajasorov t eA Yemoja
Yemoja
devotee in NigeriaThe Yoruba religion
Yoruba religion
comprises the traditional religious and spiritual concepts and practices of the Yoruba people
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Olorun
Olorun (Yoruba: Ọlọrun or Ọlọhun), literally the ruler of (or in) the Heavens, is the name given to one of the three manifestations of the Supreme God
God
in the Yoruba pantheon. Olorun is the owner of the heavens and, in this manifestation, is associated with the Sun. The vital energy of Olorun manifests in humans as Ashé, which is the life force that runs through all living things.[1] In Yorubaland, Akamara is believed to be the Source of all Existence
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Osun-Osogbo
Osun- Osogbo
Osogbo
or Osun- Osogbo
Osogbo
Sacred Grove is a sacred forest along the banks of the Osun river
Osun river
just outside the city of Osogbo, Osun
Osun
State, Nigeria. The Osun- Osogbo
Osogbo
Grove is among the last of the sacred forests which usually adjoined the edges of most Yoruba cities before extensive urbanization. In recognition of its global significance and its cultural value, the Sacred Grove was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2005.[1] The 1950s saw the desecration of the Osun- Osogbo
Osogbo
Grove: shrines were neglected, priests abandoned the grove as customary responsibilities and sanctions weakened
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Yoruba Traditional Art
The Yoruba of West Africa
West Africa
(Benin, Nigeria
Nigeria
and Togo, with migrant communities in parts of Ghana, and Sierra Leone) are responsible for one of the finest artistic traditions in Africa, a tradition that remains vital and influential today.[1] Much of the art of the Yoruba, including staffs, court dress, and beadwork for crowns, is associated with the royal courts. The courts also commissioned numerous architectural objects such as veranda posts, gates, and doors that are embellished with carvings. Other Yoruba art
Yoruba art
is related shrines and masking traditions. The Yoruba worship a large pantheon of deities, and shrines dedicated to these gods are adorned with carvings and house and array of altar figures and other ritual paraphernalia
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Ogboni
Ogboni (also known as Osugbo in Ijèbú) is a fraternal institution indigenous to the Yoruba language-speaking polities of Nigeria, Republic of Bénin
Republic of Bénin
and Togo, as well as among the Edo people. A similar group in Igbo-speaking areas is called Nze na Ozo. The society performs a range of political and religious functions, including exercising a profound influence on monarchs and serving as high courts of jurisprudence in capital offenses. Its members are generally considered to constitute the nobility of the various Yoruba kingdoms of West Africa. The Iwarefa[edit] Each Ogboni lodge is led by a group of six principal officers that are collectively known as the Iwarefa ( lit. "The Six Wise Men")
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Gelede
The Gẹlẹdẹ
Gẹlẹdẹ
spectacle of the Yoruba is a public display by colorful masks which combines art and ritual dance to amuse, educate and inspire worship.[1] Gelede
Gelede
celebrates “Mothers” (awon iya wa), a group that includes female ancestors and deities as well as the elderly women of the community, and the power and spiritual capacity these women have in society
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Egungun
Egungun, in the broadest sense of the word, refers to all types of Yoruba masquerades or masked, costumed figures.[1] When used in its more specific, common sense, "Egungun" refers to the Yoruba masquerades connected with ancestor reverence, or to the ancestors themselves as a collective force. The singular form, for an individual ancestor, is Egun.Contents1 Classification of Egungun
Egungun
types 2 Egungun
Egungun
ensembles 3 References 4 Further reading4.1 Film & Video5 External linksClassification of Egungun
Egungun
types[edit]The classification of Egun or Egungun
Egungun
types, which might appear to be a fairly straightforward task, is in fact an extremely complex problem involving the comprehension of indigenous taxonomies
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Babalawo
Babaaláwo or Babalawo
Babalawo
(Babalao or Babalaô in Latin America; literally meaning 'father of the mysteries' in the Yoruba language) is a spiritual title that denotes a priest of the Ifá
Ifá
oracle. Ifá
Ifá
is a divination system that represents the teachings of the Orisha Orunmila, the Orisha of Wisdom, who in turn serves as the oracular representative of Olodumare. A Babalawo's female counterpart is known as an Iyanifa.Contents1 Functions in society 2 Training 3 See also 4 External linksFunctions in society[edit] The Babalawos ascertain the future of their clients through communication with Ifá
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Yoruba Calendar
The Yoruba calendar (Kojoda) according to "Ralaran Uléìmȯkiri" (ralaran.com) has a year beginning on the last moon of May or first moon of June of the Gregorian calendar, and an era of 8042 BC. The new year coincides with the Ifá
Ifá
festival The traditional Yoruba week has four days. The four days that are dedicated to the Orisa go as follow:Day 1 is dedicated to Obatala
Obatala
(Sopanna, Iyaami, and the Egungun) Day 2 is dedicated to Orunmila (Esu, Ifá
Ifá
and Osun) * Day 3 is dedicated to Ogun (Osoosi) Day 4 is dedicated to Sango (Oya)To reconcile with the Gregorian calendar, Yoruba people
Yoruba people
also measure time in seven days a week and four weeks a month
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Letra Del Año
The Letra del año (Spanish) or Letra do Ano (Portuguese) (English: Letter of the year) is an annual proclamation of predictions and advice by babalawo's for the coming year, usually issued every December 31 (New Year's Eve on the Gregorian calendar). In Yorubaland, it is made by a council of babalawo's during the Odun Ifa (New Year) festival during June. In most of Latin America, a national council of babalawo's is usually responsible for the announcements of predictions. In Cuba, however, at least two national councils (one of which is state-sponsored) offer letras del año
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Ase (Yoruba)
Orishas/IrunmoleElegua Eshu Ogun Oshosi Osun Ori Orunmila Obatala Shango Aganju Yemoja Oshun Oya Oba Osanyin Babalu Aye Olokun Orisha Oko Erinle Oshunmare IbejiVariants Yoruba religion
Yoruba religion
(Nigeria) Santería
Santería
(Cuba) Candomblé Ketu
Candomblé Ketu
(Brazil) Spiritual Baptist (Trinidad) Oyotunji (United States)TopicsMedicine Music Itan Art Ogboni Gelede Egungun Babalawo Calendar Letra del año AsheSacred sitesIle Ife Oyo Osun-Osogbo YorubalandLegendary figuresOduduwa Oranyan Moremi Ajasorov t eYoruba Veranda Posts, Brooklyn MuseumAse (or às̩e̩ or ashe[1]) is a West African philosophical concept through which the Yoruba of Nigeria
Nigeria
conceive the power to make things happen and produce change
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Ife
Ife
Ife
(Yoruba: Ifè, also Ilé-Ifẹ̀) is an ancient Yoruba city in south-western Nigeria. The city is located in the present day Osun State. Ife
Ife
is about 218 kilometres (135 mi) northeast of Lagos.[2]Contents1 History1.1 Mythic origin of Ife: Creation of the world 1.2 Origin of the regional states: Dispersal from the holy city2 Traditional setting2.1 The King (Ooni) 2.2 Cults for the spirits 2.3 Art history3 Government 4 Geography 5 Economy 6 Exhibition 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit]Yoruba Copper mask for King Obalufon, Ife, Nigeria
Nigeria
c. 1300 C.E.Mythic origin of Ife: Creation of the world[edit] According to Yoruba religion, Olodumare, the Supreme God, ordered Obatala
Obatala
to create the earth but on his way he found palm wine which he drank and became intoxicated
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Oyo, Nigeria
Oyo[1] is a city in Oyo State, Nigeria, founded as the capital of the Oyo Kingdom in the 1830s and known to its people as 'New Oyo' (Ọyọ Atiba) to distinguish it from the former capital to the north, 'Old Oyo' (Ọyọ-Ile), which had been deserted as a result of rumors of war. Its inhabitants are mostly of the Yoruba people, and its ruler is the imperial majesty Alaafin
Alaafin
of Oyo. The major market in the city is Akeesan market, also called Oja Oba (King's market) its very close to the Alaafin's Palace, which is opened on a daily basis unlike the other marketplaces, such as Ajegunle market, irepodun market which is opened for a five-day interval, and Sabo market (five days). 'Oyo town', as it is fondly called, is known for the high educational pedigree of the old St Andrew's College, Oyo (SACO), which was one of the first higher institutions in Nigeria
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Yorubaland
Monarchies • Oba (King) • Ògbóni (Legislature) • Olóye (Chiefs) • Balógun (Generalissimo) • Baálẹ̀ (Village/Regional heads in Western Yorubaland) • Ọlọja (Village/Regional heads in Eastern Yorubaland)Area • Total 142,114 km2 (54,871 sq mi)Highest elevation 1,055 m (3,461 ft)Lowest elevation -0.2 m (-0.7 ft)Population (2015 estimate) • Total ~ 55 million • Density 387/km2 (1,000/sq mi)  In Nigeria, Benin
Benin
and TogoDemographics • Language Yoruba • English • French • Religion Christianity Islam Yoruba religionTime zone WAT (Nigeria, Benin), GMT
GMT
(Togo) Yorubaland
Yorubaland
(Yoruba: Ilè Yorùbá) is the cultural region of the Yoruba people
Yoruba people
in West Africa
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Oyotunji
Coordinates: 32°36′34.51″N 80°48′10.24″W / 32.6095861°N 80.8028444°W / 32.6095861; -80.8028444 Oyotunji African Village is a village located near Sheldon, Beaufort County, South Carolina
South Carolina
that was founded by Oba Efuntola Oseijeman Adelabu Adefunmi I in 1970.[1][2] Oyotunji village is named after the Oyo empire, and the name literally means "Oyo returns" or "Oyo rises again".[1][3] Oyotunji village covers 27 acres (11 ha) and has a Yoruba temple which was moved from Harlem, New York
Harlem, New York
to its present location in 1960.[4][5][6] During the 1970s, the era of greatest population growth at the village, the number of inhabitants grew from 5 to between 200 and 250. (Goldstein, Hunt, and McCray) The population is rumored to fluctuate between 5 and 9 families as of the last 10 years
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Oduduwa
Oduduwa
Oduduwa
Olofin Adimula, Emperor of the Yoruba was the first Ooni, or monarch, of Ile-Ife
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