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Chris Thile
Christopher Scott Thile (/ˈθiːliː/;[3] born February 20, 1981) is an American mandolinist, singer, songwriter, composer, and radio personality, best known for his work in the progressive acoustic trio Nickel Creek
Nickel Creek
and the acoustic folk and progressive bluegrass quintet Punch Brothers
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Winfield, Kansas
Winfield is a city and county seat of Cowley County, Kansas, United States.[7] It is situated along the Walnut River
Walnut River
in South Central Kansas
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Sitar
The sitar (English: /ˈsɪtɑːr/ or /sɪˈtɑːr/; सितार, Punjabi: ਸਿਤਾਰ, sitāra pronounced [sɪˈtaːr]) is a plucked stringed instrument used in Hindustani classical music. The instrument is believed to have been derived from the veena, an ancient Indian instrument, which was modified by a Mughal court musician to conform with the tastes of his Mughal patrons and named after a Persian instrument called the setar (meaning three strings). The sitar flourished in the 16th and 17th centuries and arrived at its present form in 18th-century India. It derives its distinctive timbre and resonance from sympathetic strings, bridge design, a long hollow neck and a gourd-shaped resonance chamber
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Hilary Hahn
Hilary Hahn
Hilary Hahn
(born November 27, 1979) is an American violinist. In her active international career she has performed throughout the world both as a soloist with leading orchestras and conductors and as a recitalist. She also has built a reputation for championing contemporary music. Several composers have written works especially for her, including concerti by Edgar Meyer
Edgar Meyer
and Jennifer Higdon and partitas by Antón García Abril.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Musical career2.1 Commissioning 2.2 Film music 2.3 On playing Bach3 Instrument 4 Journal 5 Discography 6 References 7 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Hahn was born in Lexington, Virginia
Lexington, Virginia
on November 27, 1979.[1] She began playing the violin one month before her fourth birthday in the Suzuki Program of Baltimore's Peabody Institute. She participated in a Suzuki class for a year
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Charlie Parker
Charles Parker Jr. (August 29, 1920 – March 12, 1955), also known as Yardbird and Bird, was an American jazz saxophonist and composer.[1] Parker was a highly influential jazz soloist and a leading figure in the development of bebop,[2] a form of jazz characterized by fast tempos, virtuosic technique and advanced harmonies. Parker was a blazingly fast virtuoso, and he introduced revolutionary harmonic ideas including rapid passing chords, new variants of altered chords, and chord substitutions. His tone ranged from clean and penetrating to sweet and somber. Parker acquired the nickname "Yardbird" early in his career.[3] This, and the shortened form "Bird", continued to be used for the rest of his life, inspiring the titles of a number of Parker compositions, such as "Yardbird Suite", "Ornithology", " Bird
Bird
Gets the Worm", and " Bird
Bird
of Paradise"
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Baseball Hall Of Fame
The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum
Museum
is an American history museum and hall of fame, located in Cooperstown, New York, and operated by private interests. It serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States
United States
and beyond, displays baseball-related artifacts and exhibits, and honors those who have excelled in playing, managing, and serving the sport. The Hall's motto is "Preserving History, Honoring Excellence, Connecting Generations." The word Cooperstown is often used as shorthand (or a metonym) for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The Hall of Fame was established in 1939 by Stephen Carlton Clark, the owner of a local hotel. Clark had sought to bring tourists to a city hurt by the Great Depression, which reduced the local tourist trade, and Prohibition, which devastated the local hops industry
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Sam Thompson
Samuel Luther "Big Sam" Thompson (March 5, 1860 – November 7, 1922) was an American professional baseball player from 1884 to 1898 and with a brief comeback in 1906. At 6 feet, 2 inches, the Indiana native was one of the larger players of his day and was known for his prominent handlebar mustache. He played as a right fielder in Major League Baseball
Baseball
for the Detroit
Detroit
Wolverines (1885–88), Philadelphia Phillies (1889–1898) and Detroit
Detroit
Tigers (1906). He was inducted into the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame in 1974. Thompson had a .331 career batting average and was one of the most prolific run producers in baseball history. His career run batted in (RBI) to games played ratio of .923 (1,305 RBIs in 1,410 games) remains the highest in major league history
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J. S. Bach
Johann Sebastian Bach[a] (31 March [O.S. 21 March] 1685 – 28 July 1750) was a German composer and musician of the Baroque period. He is known for instrumental compositions such as the Brandenburg Concertos
Brandenburg Concertos
and the Goldberg Variations, and vocal music such as the St Matthew Passion and the Mass in B minor. Since the 19th-century Bach Revival he has been generally regarded as one of the greatest composers of all time.[2] The Bach family
Bach family
already counted several composers when Johann Sebastian was born as the last child of a city musician in Eisenach. After becoming an orphan at age 10, he lived for five years with his eldest brother, after which he continued his musical development in Lüneburg
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Béla Fleck
Béla Anton Leoš Fleck (born July 10, 1958) is an American banjo player. An innovative and technically proficient banjo player,[1] he is best known for his work with the bands New Grass Revival
New Grass Revival
and Béla Fleck and the Flecktones.[2]Contents1 Early life and career 2 Béla Fleck
Béla Fleck
and the Flecktones 3 Other music and recordings 4 Personal life 5 Media appearances 6 Festivals 7 Discography 8 Accolades8.1 Grammy Awards and nominations9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksEarly life and career[edit] A native of New York City, Fleck was named after Hungarian composer Béla Bartók, Austrian composer Anton Webern, and Czech composer Leoš Janáček. He was drawn to the banjo at a young age when he heard Earl Scruggs
Earl Scruggs
play the theme song for the television show Beverly Hillbillies[3] and when he heard "Dueling Banjos" by Eric Weissberg and Steve Mandell on the radio
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Viola
The viola (/viˈoʊlə/;[1] Italian pronunciation: [viˈɔːla]) is a string instrument that is bowed or played with varying techniques. It is slightly larger than a violin and has a lower and deeper sound. Since the 18th century, it has been the middle or alto voice of the violin family, between the violin (which is tuned a perfect fifth above) and the cello (which is tuned an octave below).[2] The strings from low to high are typically tuned to C3, G3, D4, and A4. In the past, the viola varied in size and style as did its names. The word viola originates from Italian. The Italians often used the term: "viola da braccio" meaning literally: 'of the arm'. "Brazzo" was another Italian word for the viola, which the Germans adopted as Bratsche. The French had their own names: cinquiesme was a small viola, haute contre was a large viola, and taile was a tenor
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Stan Getz
Stan Getz
Stan Getz
(born Stanley Gayetski; February 2, 1927 – June 6, 1991) was an American jazz saxophonist. Playing primarily the tenor saxophone, Getz was known as "The Sound" because of his warm, lyrical tone, his prime influence being the wispy, mellow timbre of his idol, Lester Young. Coming to prominence in the late 1940s with Woody Herman's big band, Getz is described by critic Scott Yanow as "one of the all-time great tenor saxophonists".[1] Getz performed in bebop and cool jazz groups. Influenced by João Gilberto
João Gilberto
and Antônio Carlos Jobim, he popularized bossa nova in America with the hit single "The Girl from Ipanema" (1964).Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Discography 5 Awards 6 Bibliography 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Getz was born Stanley Gayetski on February 2, 1927, at St. Vincent's Hospital in Philadelphia
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Tenor Guitar
The tenor guitar or four-string guitar is a slightly smaller, four-string relative of the steel-string acoustic guitar or electric guitar. The instrument was initially developed in its acoustic form by Gibson Guitar
Guitar
Company and C. F. Martin & Company so that players of the four-string tenor banjo could double on guitar.[1]Contents1 Construction 2 History and development 3 Tuning 4 Related instruments 5 Use and performers 6 Current use 7 See also 8 ReferencesConstruction[edit] Tenor guitars are four-stringed instruments normally made in the shape of a guitar, or sometimes with a lute-like pear shaped body or, more rarely, with a round banjo-like wooden body
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Jazz
Jazz
Jazz
is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, United States,[1] in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime.[2] Jazz
Jazz
is seen by many as 'America's classical music'.[3] Since the 1920s Jazz
Jazz
Age, jazz has become recognized as a major form of musical expression. It then emerged in the form of independent traditional and popular musical styles, all linked by the common bonds of African-American
African-American
and European-American
European-American
musical parentage with a performance orientation.[4] Jazz
Jazz
is characterized by swing and blue notes, call and response vocals, polyrhythms and improvisation
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Walnut Valley Festival
The Walnut Valley Festival
Walnut Valley Festival
(generally referred to as "Winfield" by non-residents or simply to Winfield locals) is an acoustic music festival, held annually in Winfield, Kansas. The main genre of music is bluegrass, but other acoustic styles are represented. The festival is held on the Wednesday through Sunday that includes the third Saturday of September.[1]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 Notes 4 External linksHistory[edit] The first official "Walnut Valley Festival" was held in September 1972. It originated as a small folk festival started on the campus of Southwestern College in 1967. Founders of the first Walnut Valley Folk Festival, among others, included Sam Ontjes, Stuart Mossman
Stuart Mossman
and families
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Folk Music
Folk music
Folk music
includes both traditional music and the genre that evolved from it during the 20th century folk revival. The term originated in the 19th century, but is often applied to music older than that. Some types of folk music are also called world music. Traditional folk music has been defined in several ways: as music transmitted orally, music with unknown composers, or music performed by custom over a long period of time. It has been contrasted with commercial and classical styles. Starting in the mid-20th century, a new form of popular folk music evolved from traditional folk music. This process and period is called the (second) folk revival and reached a zenith in the 1960s
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Banjo
The banjo is a four-, five- or six-stringed instrument with a thin membrane stretched over a frame or cavity as a resonator, called the head. The membrane, or head, is typically made of plastic, although animal skin is still occasionally but rarely used, and the frame is typically circular. Early forms of the instrument were fashioned by Africans in America, adapted from African instruments of similar design.[1][2] The banjo is frequently associated with folk, Irish traditional, and country music. Historically, the banjo occupied a central place in African American
African American
traditional music, before becoming popular in the minstrel shows of the 19th century.[3][4][5] The banjo, with the fiddle, is a mainstay of American old-time music
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