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Chopped After Hours
Chopped After Hours
Chopped After Hours
is an American cooking show on the Food Network, hosted by Ted Allen.[1][2]Contents1 Format 2 Episodes2.1 Season 1 2.2 Season 23 References 4 External linksFormat[edit] A spin-off of Chopped, this show features a similar format with mandatory ingredients and time restriction.[3] Episodes consist of three segments, each featuring the judges from a different Chopped episode. The judges are given one of that episode's mystery ingredient baskets and must cook a dish that incorporates them
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Ted Allen
Edward "Ted" Allen (born May 20, 1965) is an American author and television personality.[3] He was the food and wine connoisseur on the Bravo network's television program Queer Eye, and has been the host of the TV cooking competition series Chopped since its launch in 2009, as well as Chopped Junior, which began in mid-2015. In April 13, 2014, he became the host of another Food Network
Food Network
show, originally called America's Best Cook; a retooled version of that show, retitled All-Star Academy, which debuted on March 1, 2015.[4] In early 2015, he also hosted a four-part special, Best. Ever., which scoured America for its best burgers, pizza, breakfast, and barbecue
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Buttermilk
Buttermilk
Buttermilk
refers to a number of dairy drinks. Originally, buttermilk was the liquid left behind after churning butter out of cultured cream. This type of buttermilk is now specifically referred to as traditional buttermilk. The term buttermilk also refers to a range of fermented milk drinks, common in warm climates (e.g., the Balkans, the Middle East, Turkey, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, India, Sri Lanka, Nicaragua and the Southern United States) where unrefrigerated fresh milk sours quickly,[1] as well as in colder climates, such as Scandinavia, Ireland, the Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, and the Czech Republic. This fermented dairy product, known as cultured buttermilk, is produced from cow's milk and has a characteristically intense sour and putrid taste caused by lactic acid bacteria
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Asparagus
Asparagus, or garden asparagus, folk name sparrow grass, scientific name Asparagus
Asparagus
officinalis, is a spring vegetable, a flowering perennial plant species in the genus Asparagus. It was once classified in the lily family, like the related Allium species, onions and garlic, but the Liliaceae
Liliaceae
have been split and the onion-like plants are now in the family Amaryllidaceae
Amaryllidaceae
and asparagus in the Asparagaceae
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Brussels Sprout
The Brussels
Brussels
sprout is a member of the Gemmifera Group of cabbages ( Brassica
Brassica
oleracea), grown for its edible buds. The leafy green vegetables are typically 2.5–4 cm (0.98–1.6 in) in diameter and look like miniature cabbages
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Old Fashioned
Place sugar cube in old fashioned glass and saturate with bitters, add a dash of plain water. Muddle until dissolved. Fill the glass with ice cubes and add whiskey. Garnish with orange twist, and a cocktail cherry.Timing Before Dinner Old Fashioned recipe at International Bartenders AssociationThe Old Fashioned is a cocktail made by muddling sugar with bitters, then adding alcohol, originally whiskey but now sometimes brandy, and finally a twist of citrus rind. It is traditionally served in a short, round, tumbler-like glass, which is called an Old Fashioned glass, named after the drink. The Old Fashioned, developed during the 19th century and given its name in the 1880s, is an IBA Official Cocktail.[1] It is also one of six basic drinks listed in David A
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Sweet Potato
The sweet potato ( Ipomoea
Ipomoea
batatas) is a dicotyledonous plant that belongs to the bindweed or morning glory family, Convolvulaceae. Its large, starchy, sweet-tasting, tuberous roots are a root vegetable.[1][2] The young leaves and shoots are sometimes eaten as greens. The sweet potato is only distantly related to the potato (Solanum tuberosum) and does not belong to the nightshade family, Solanaceae, but both families belong to the same taxonomic order, the Solanales. The plant is a herbaceous perennial vine, bearing alternate heart-shaped or palmately lobed leaves and medium-sized sympetalous flowers. The edible tuberous root is long and tapered, with a smooth skin whose color ranges between yellow, orange, red, brown, purple, and beige. Its flesh ranges from beige through white, red, pink, violet, yellow, orange, and purple
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Ginger
Ginger
Ginger
( Zingiber
Zingiber
officinale) is a flowering plant whose rhizome, ginger root or simply ginger, is widely used as a spice or a folk medicine.[2] It is a herbaceous perennial which grows annual pseudostems (false stems made of the rolled bases of leaves) about a meter tall bearing narrow leaf blades. The inflorescences bear pale yellow with purple flowers and arise directly from the rhizome on separate shoots.[3] Ginger
Ginger
is in the family Zingiberaceae, to which also belong turmeric (Curcuma longa), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum), and galangal
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Crème Brûlée
Crème brûlée
Crème brûlée
(/ˌkrɛm bruːˈleɪ/; French pronunciation: ​[kʁɛm bʁy.le]), also known as burnt cream or Trinity cream[1], is a dessert consisting of a rich custard base topped with a contrasting layer of hard caramel. It is normally served at room temperature
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Shiso
Perilla frutescens
Perilla frutescens
var. crispa, also called shiso (/ˈʃiːsoʊ/,[1] from Japanese シソ) is a variety of species Perilla frutescens
Perilla frutescens
of the genus Perilla, belonging to the mint family, Lamiaceae. Shiso
Shiso
is a perennial plant that may be cultivated as an annual in temperate climates. The plant occurs in red (purple-leaved) and green-leaved forms
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Aspic
Aspic
Aspic
is a dish in which ingredients are set into a gelatin made from a meat stock or consommé. Non-savory dishes, often made with commercial gelatin mixes without stock or consommé, are usually called jello salads in the United States or gelatin salads elsewhere. When cooled, stock that is made from meat congeals because of the natural gelatin found in the meat. The stock can be clarified with egg whites, and then filled and flavored just before the aspic sets. Almost any type of food can be set into aspics. Most common are meat pieces, fruits, or vegetables. Aspics are usually served on cold plates so that the gel will not melt before being eaten. A meat jelly that includes cream is called a chaud-froid. Almost any meat, poultry, or fish can be used to make gelatin. The aspic may need additional gelatin in order to set properly. Veal stock provides a great deal of gelatin; in making stock, veal is often included with other meat for that reason
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Avocado
The avocado ( Persea
Persea
americana) is a tree, long thought to have originated in South Central Mexico,[2][3] classified as a member of the flowering plant family Lauraceae.[4] Avocado
Avocado
(also alligator pear) refers to the tree's fruit, which is botanically a large berry containing a single large seed.[5] Avocados are commercially valuable and are cultivated in tropical and Mediterranean climates throughout the world.[4] They have a green-skinned, fleshy body that may be pear-shaped, egg-shaped, or spherical. Commercially, they ripen after harvesting
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Pound Cake
Pound cake refers to a type of cake traditionally made with a pound of each of four ingredients: flour, butter, eggs, and sugar. Pound cakes are generally baked in either a loaf pan or a Bundt mold, and served either dusted with powdered sugar, lightly glazed, or sometimes with a coat of icing.Contents1 History 2 Variations2.1 American South style 2.2 French style 2.3 Mexican style 2.4 Venezuelan and Colombian style 2.5 German style3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] It is believed that the pound cake is of northern European origin that dates back to the early 1700s. A recipe for pound cake is in the first American cookbook, American Cookery, which was published in 1796.[1] Over time the ingredients for pound cake changed. Eliza Leslie, who wrote the 1851 edition of Direction for Cookery, used 10 eggs, beat them as lightly as possible, mixed them with a pound of flour, then added the juice of two lemons or three large oranges
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Chop Suey
Chop suey
Chop suey
(/ˈtʃɒpˈsuːi/) is a dish in American Chinese cuisine and other forms of overseas Chinese cuisine, consisting of meat (often chicken, fish, beef, shrimp, or pork) and eggs, cooked quickly with vegetables such as bean sprouts, cabbage, and celery and bound in a starch-thickened sauce. It is typically served with rice but can become the Chinese-American form of chow mein with the addition of stir-fried noodles. Chop suey
Chop suey
has become a prominent part of American Chinese cuisine, Filipino cuisine, Canadian Chinese cuisine, German Chinese cuisine, Indian Chinese cuisine, and Polynesian cuisine
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Corn Tortilla
In North America
North America
and Central America, a corn tortilla or just tortilla (/tɔːrˈtiːə/, Spanish: [torˈtiʎa]) is a type of thin, unleavened flatbread, made from finely ground maize (corn). In Guatemala
Guatemala
and Mexico, there are three colors of maize dough for making tortillas: white maize, yellow maize and blue maize (or black maize). An influential 2002 study by Matsuoka et al. has demonstrated that, rather than the multiple independent domestications model, all maize arose from a single domestication in southern Mexico
Mexico
about 9,000 years ago
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Marcus Samuelsson
Marcus Samuelsson (born Kassahun Tsegie; Amharic: ካሳሁን ፅጌ 25 January 1971)[3] is an Ethiopian-born, Swedish-raised chef and restaurateur. He is the head chef of Red Rooster in Harlem, New York.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career2.1 Media appearances3 Books 4 Personal life 5 References 6 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Kassahun Tsegie was born in 1971 in Ethiopia. His father, Tsegie, is an Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church priest. His mother died in a tuberculosis epidemic when he was three years old. As detailed in Samuelsson's appearance on Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown[4] he and his elder sister, Fantaye,[3] were separated from their family during the turmoil of the Ethiopian Civil War, which began in 1974. Subsequently, the siblings were adopted by Ann Marie and Lennart Samuelsson, a homemaker and a geologist, respectively, who lived in Gothenburg, Sweden. The siblings' names were changed to Marcus and Linda Samuelsson
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