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Chocolate
Chocolate
Chocolate
(from náhuatl: xocolātl ) (/ˈtʃɒklɪt, -kəlɪt, -lət, ˈtʃɔːk-/ ( listen)) is a typically sweet, usually brown food preparation of Theobroma cacao
Theobroma cacao
seeds, roasted and ground. It is made in the form of a liquid, paste, or in a block, or used as a flavoring ingredient in other foods. Cacao has been cultivated by many cultures for at least three millennia in Mesoamerica. The earliest evidence of use traces to the Olmecs (Mexico), with evidence of chocolate beverages dating back to 1900 BCE.[1] The majority of Mesoamerican
Mesoamerican
people made chocolate beverages, including the Maya and Aztecs.[2] The seeds of the cacao tree have an intense bitter taste and must be fermented to develop the flavor. After fermentation, the beans are dried, cleaned, and roasted
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Quetzalcoatl
Deities: Ehecatl, Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli, Kukulkan
Kukulkan
(Maya) Nicknames: "Feathered Serpent", "Precious Twin"[1]Major cult center Temple of the Feathered Serpent, TeotihuacanPlanet VenusAnimals SnakeRegion MesoamericaEthnic group AztecFestivals SeveralPersonal informationParents Mixcoatl
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Aztec
Aztec
Aztec
culture (/ˈæztɛk/), was a Mesoamerican culture that flourished in central Mexico
Mexico
in the post-classic period from 1300 to 1521, during the time in which a triple alliance of the Mexica, Texcoca and Tepaneca tribes established the Aztec
Aztec
empire. The Aztec people were certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl
Nahuatl
language and who dominated large parts of Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
from the 14th to the 16th centuries. Aztec
Aztec
culture is the culture of the people referred to as Aztecs, but since most ethnic groups of central Mexico
Mexico
in the postclassic period shared basic cultural traits, many of the traits that characterize Aztec
Aztec
culture cannot be said to be exclusive to the Aztecs
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Brooklyn Museum
The Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Museum is an art museum located in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. At 560,000 square feet (52,000 m2), the museum is New York City's third largest in physical size and holds an art collection with roughly 1.5 million works.[2] Located near the Prospect Heights, Crown Heights, Flatbush, and Park Slope neighborhoods of Brooklyn
Brooklyn
and founded in 1895, the Beaux-Arts building, designed by McKim, Mead and White, was planned to be the largest art museum in the world. The museum initially struggled to maintain its building and collection, only to be revitalized in the late 20th century, thanks to major renovations. Significant areas of the collection include antiquities, specifically their collection of Egyptian antiquities
Egyptian antiquities
spanning over 3,000 years
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Veracruz
Veracruz
Veracruz
(American Spanish: [beɾaˈkɾus] ( listen)), formally Veracruz
Veracruz
de Ignacio de la Llave (American Spanish: [beɾaˈkɾuz ðe iɣˈnasjo ðe la ˈʝaβe]), officially the Free and Sovereign State of Veracruz
Veracruz
de Ignacio de la Llave (Spanish: Estado Libre y Soberano de Veracruz
Veracruz
de Ignacio de la Llave), is one of the 31 states that, along with the Federal District, comprise the 32 federative entities of Mexico
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Maya Script
Mayan script, also known as Mayan glyphs, was the writing system of the Maya civilization
Maya civilization
of Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
and is the only Mesoamerican writing system that has been substantially deciphered. The earliest inscriptions found which are identifiably Maya date to the 3rd century BCE in San Bartolo, Guatemala.[1][2] Maya writing was in continuous use throughout Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
until the Spanish conquest of the Maya
Spanish conquest of the Maya
in the 16th and 17th centuries. Maya writing used logograms complemented with a set of syllabic glyphs, somewhat similar in function to modern Japanese writing
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Ivory Coast
Coordinates: 8°N 5°W / 8°N 5°W / 8; -5 Republic
Republic
of Côte d'Ivoire République de Côte d'Ivoire (French)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Union – Discipline – Travail" (French) "Unity – Discipline – Work"Anthem: L'Abidjanaise Song of AbidjanLocation of  Ivory Coast  (dark blue) in the African Union  (light blue)Capital Yamoussoukro
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Creme De Cacao
Crème or creme is a French word for 'cream', used in culinary terminology for various cream-like preparations, each often abbreviated to simply "creme":Cream Crème fraîche, a cultured cream Crème Chantilly, whipped creamCustard Crème anglaise, a pouring custard used as a dessert sauce C
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Alkaloid
Alkaloids are a group of naturally occurring chemical compounds that mostly contain basic nitrogen atoms. This group also includes some related compounds with neutral[2] and even weakly acidic properties.[3] Some synthetic compounds of similar structure are also termed alkaloids.[4] In addition to carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen, alkaloids may also contain oxygen, sulfur and, more rarely, other elements such as chlorine, bromine, and phosphorus.[5] Alkaloids are produced by a large variety of organisms including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. They can be purified from crude extracts of these organisms by acid-base extraction. Alkaloids have a wide range of pharmacological activities including antimalarial (e.g. quinine), antiasthma (e.g. ephedrine), anticancer (e.g. homoharringtonine),[6] cholinomimetic (e.g. galantamine),[7] vasodilatory (e.g. vincamine), antiarrhythmic (e.g. quinidine), analgesic (e.g. morphine),[8] antibacterial (e.g
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Bitter (taste)
Taste, gustatory perception, or gustation[1] is one of the five traditional senses that belongs to the gustatory system. Taste
Taste
is the sensation produced when a substance in the mouth reacts chemically with taste receptor cells located on taste buds in the oral cavity, mostly on the tongue. Taste, along with smell (olfaction) and trigeminal nerve stimulation (registering texture, pain, and temperature), determines flavors of food or other substances. Humans have taste receptors on taste buds (gustatory calyculi) and other areas including the upper surface of the tongue and the epiglottis.[2][3] The gustatory cortex is responsible for the perception of taste. The tongue is covered with thousands of small bumps called papillae, which are visible to the naked eye. Within each papilla are hundreds of taste buds.[4] The exception to this is the filiform papillae that do not contain taste buds
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Anandamide
Anandamide, also known as N-arachidonoylethanolamine or AEA, is a fatty acid neurotransmitter derived from the non-oxidative metabolism of eicosatetraenoic acid (arachidonic acid) an essential ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid. The name is taken from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
& Pāli
Pāli
word ananda, which means "joy, bliss, delight", and amide.[1][2] It is synthesized from N-arachidonoyl phosphatidylethanolamine by multiple pathways.[3] It is degraded primarily by the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) enzyme, which converts anandamide into ethanolamine and arachidonic acid
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Maya Civilization
The Maya civilization
Maya civilization
was a Mesoamerican civilization developed by the Maya peoples, and noted for its hieroglyphic script—the only known fully developed writing system of the pre-Columbian Americas—as well as for its art, architecture, mathematics, calendar, and astronomical system. The Maya civilization
Maya civilization
developed in an area that encompasses southeastern Mexico, all of Guatemala
Guatemala
and Belize, and the western portions of Honduras
Honduras
and El Salvador
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Olmec
The Olmecs were the earliest known major civilization in Mexico following a progressive development in Soconusco. They lived in the tropical lowlands of south-central Mexico, in the present-day states of Veracruz
Veracruz
and Tabasco. It has been speculated that the Olmecs derive in part from neighboring Mokaya
Mokaya
or Mixe–Zoque. The Olmecs flourished during Mesoamerica's formative period, dating roughly from as early as 1500 BCE to about 400 BCE
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Paul Gavarni
Paul Gavarni was the nom de plume of Sulpice Guillaume Chevalier (13 January 1804, Paris – 24 November 1866),[1] a French illustrator, born in Paris.Contents1 Early career 2 Nom-de-plume 3 Publications 4 Illustrated works 5 Change in focus 6 Visit to England 7 Collections and catalogues 8 References 9 External linksEarly career[edit] Gavarni's father Sulpice Chevalier was from a family line of coopers from Burgundy.[1] Paul began work as a mechanical worker in a machine factory but he saw that to make any progress in his profession, he had to be able to draw; accordingly in his spare time in the evenings, he took classes in drawing
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Sugar
Sugar
Sugar
is the generic name for sweet-tasting, soluble carbohydrates, many of which are used in food. There are various types of sugar derived from different sources. Simple sugars are called monosaccharides and include glucose (also known as dextrose), fructose, and galactose. The "table sugar" or "granulated sugar" most customarily used as food is sucrose, a disaccharide of glucose and fructose. Sugar
Sugar
is used in prepared foods (e.g., cookies and cakes) and is added to some foods and beverages (e.g., coffee and tea). In the body, sucrose is hydrolysed into the simple sugars fructose and glucose. Other disaccharides include maltose from malted grain, and lactose from milk. Longer chains of sugars are called oligosaccharides or polysaccharides. Some other chemical substances, such as glycerol and sugar alcohols may also have a sweet taste, but are not classified as sugars
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Chiapas
^ a. By the will of the people of Chiapas
Chiapas
expressed by direct vote for incorporation into the Federation. ^ b. The state's GDP
GDP
was 153,062,117 thousand of pesos in 2008,[7] amount corresponding to 11,957,977.89 thousand of dollars, being a dollar worth 12.80 pesos (value of June 3, 2010).[8] Chiapas
Chiapas
(Spanish pronunciation: [ˈtʃjapas] ( listen)), officially the Free and Sovereign State of Chiapas
Chiapas
(Spanish: Estado Libre y Soberano de Chiapas), is one of the 31 states that with Mexico
Mexico
City make up the 32 federal entities of Mexico. It is divided into 124 municipalities as of September 2017[9][10] and its capital city is Tuxtla Gutiérrez. Other important population centers in Chiapas
Chiapas
include Ocosingo, Tapachula, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Comitán
Comitán
and Arriaga
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