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Chinese Cuisine
Chinese cuisine
Chinese cuisine
is an important part of Chinese culture, which includes cuisine originating from the diverse regions of China, as well as from Chinese people in other parts of the world. Because of the Chinese diaspora
Chinese diaspora
and historical power of the country, Chinese cuisine has influenced many other cuisines in Asia, with modifications made to cater to local palates. The preference for seasoning and cooking techniques of Chinese provinces depend on differences in historical background and ethnic groups. Geographic features including mountains, rivers, forests and deserts also have a strong effect on the local available ingredients, considering climate of China
China
varies from tropical in the south to subarctic in the northeast. Imperial, royal and noble preference also plays a role in the change of Chinese cuisines
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Chinese Food (other)
Chinese food refers to Chinese cuisine
Chinese cuisine
or food. Chinese food may also refer to:"Chinese Food" (song), a 2013 song that went viral by newcomer singer Alison Gold China Foods Limited, or China Foods, formerly COFCO International Limited, company engaged in food processing and food trading Chinese food therapy
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Chinese Buddhist Cuisine
Buddhist cuisine
Buddhist cuisine
is an East Asian cuisine
Asian cuisine
which is followed by monks and many believers from areas historically influenced by Chinese Buddhism. It is vegetarian or vegan, and it is based on the Dharmic concept of ahimsa (non-violence). Vegetarianism
Vegetarianism
is common in other Dharmic faiths such as Hinduism, Jainism
Jainism
and Sikhism
Sikhism
as well as East Asian religions like Taoism
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Tibetan Cuisine
Tibetan cuisine
Tibetan cuisine
includes the culinary traditions and practices of Tibet
Tibet
and its peoples, many of whom reside in India
India
and Nepal. The cuisine reflects the Tibetan landscape of mountains and plateaus and includes influences from neighbours (including India
India
and Nepal). It is known for its use of noodles, goat, yak, mutton, dumplings, cheese (often from yak or goat milk), butter, yoghurt (also from animals adapted to the Tibetan climate) and soups
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Taiwanese Cuisine
Taiwanese cuisine
Taiwanese cuisine
(Chinese: 臺灣菜; pinyin: Táiwāncài; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Tâi-oân-chhài, or 臺灣料理; Táiwān liàolǐ; Tâi-oân liāu-lí) has several variations. In addition to the following representative dishes from the people of Hoklo ethnicity (see Taiwanese people), there are also Aboriginal, Hakka, and local derivatives of Chinese cuisines such as beef noodle soup. Taiwanese cuisine
Taiwanese cuisine
itself is often associated with influences from mid to southern provinces of China, most notably from the province of Fujian (Hokkien), but influences from all of mainland China
China
can easily be found. A notable Japanese influence also exists due to the period when Taiwan
Taiwan
was under Japanese rule
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Macanese Cuisine
Macanese cuisine
Macanese cuisine
is unique to Macau, and consists of a blend of southern Chinese and Portuguese cuisines, with significant influences from Southeast Asia
Southeast Asia
and the Lusophone world. Many unique dishes resulted from the spice blends that the wives of Portuguese sailors used in an attempt to replicate European dishes. Its ingredients and seasonings include those from Europe, Latin America, Africa, India, and Southeast Asia, as well as local Chinese ingredients. Common cooking techniques include baking, grilling and roasting. The former, seldom seen in other styles of Chinese cooking, speaks to the eclectic nature of Macanese cooking
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Chinese Regional Cuisine
Chinese regional cuisines are the different cuisines found in different provinces and prefectures of China
China
as well as from larger Chinese communities overseas. A number of different styles contribute to Chinese cuisine
Chinese cuisine
but perhaps the best k
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Shanxi Cuisine
Shanxi cuisine, or Shan cuisine, is derived from the native cooking styles of Shanxi Province in China. It is famous for noodles, fried flatbread (da bing) and sour tastes. The cuisine is also famed for using its locally produced vinegar, just like in Huaiyang cuisine, but the flavour is totally different. Generally speaking, Shanxi cuisine is less known to people outside the region. One of the reasons is that Shanxi is less populated as compared to other provinces in China. Being a very traditional region where the lifestyle of locals has not been modernised, many outsiders find Shanxi cuisine too authentic and traditional. Despite the use of pork and chicken, one of the most popular meat sources in Shanxi is lamb, as well as some other parts of the body of a goat or sheep. For example, lamb soup is usually cooked with livers, stomach and some other organs from the lamb
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Manchu Cuisine
Manchu cuisine or Manchurian cuisine is the cuisine of Manchuria, the historical name for a region which now covers mostly Northeast China and some parts of Russia. It uses the traditional Manchu staple foods of millet, broomcorn millet, soybean, peas, corn and broomcorn. It relies heavily on preserved foods (often pickling) due to the harsh winters and scorching summers in Northeast China. Manchu cuisine is also known for grilling, wild meat, strong flavours and the wide use of soy sauce. Manchu cuisine is more wheat based than Han Chinese cuisines. History[edit] The ancestors of the Manchus were the Jurchen and Mohe people. The Mohe enjoyed eating pork, practised pig farming extensively, and were mainly sedentary, and also used both pig and dog skins for coats
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Haipai Cuisine
Haipai cuisine is a Western-style cooking, that is unique to Shanghai, China. It absorbed the traditions of several cuisines from other regions of China and of Western cooking and adapted them to suit the local taste according to the features of local ingredients. It is divided into several major types: French, Italian, Russian, British, and German,[1][2] among which the Russian-type dishes, such as the Shanghai-style borscht (luó sòng tāng), receive a great welcome as they are more affordable.[3] Today, the most famous dishes of Haipai cuisine are luó sòng tāng, fried pork chops (breaded cutlet), and Shanghai salad (a variety of Olivier salad). Apart from the above-mentioned common dishes, baked clams, baked crabs, and jin bi duo soup ("million dollar soup") are also popular among the Haipai dishes. Hundred years since it opened to foreign traders, Shanghai has witnessed the increasing popularity of Haipai cuisine
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Guizhou Cuisine
Guizhou
Guizhou
cuisine, or Qian cuisine, consists of cooking traditions and dishes from Guizhou
Guizhou
Province in southwestern China. Guizhou
Guizhou
cuisine shares many features with Sichuan cuisine
Sichuan cuisine
and Hunan cuisine, especially in bringing the sensation of spiciness and pungency. What makes Guizhou
Guizhou
cuisine unique is the emphasis of a mixed sour-and-spicy taste, as compared to the numbing-and-hot sensation (麻辣; má là) featured in Sichuan cuisine
Sichuan cuisine
and the dry-hot taste (干辣; 乾辣; gān là) featured in Hunan cuisine.[1] There is an ancient local saying, "Without eating a sour dish for three days, people will stagger with weak legs"
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Huaiyang Cuisine
Huaiyang cuisine (淮揚菜) is one of the Four Great Traditions in Chinese cuisine. It is derived from the native cooking styles of the region surrounding the lower reaches of the Huai and Yangtze rivers, and centred upon the cities of Huai'an, Yangzhou and Zhenjiang in Jiangsu Province
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Anhui Cuisine
Anhui
Anhui
cuisine, alternatively referred to as Hui cuisine, is one of the Eight Culinary Traditions of Chinese cuisine. It is derived from the native cooking styles of the Huangshan
Huangshan
region in southern Anhui Province, and is similar to Jiangsu cuisine.[citation needed]Contents1 Methods and ingredients 2 Notable dishes in Anhui
Anhui
cuisine 3 See also 4 ReferencesMethods and ingredients[edit] Anhui
Anhui
cuisine is known for its use of wild herbs, from both the land and the sea, and simple methods of preparation. Braising
Braising
and stewing are common cooking techniques
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Chinese Aristocrat Cuisine
Chinese aristocrat cuisine (Chinese: 官府菜; pinyin: guānfǔ cài) traces its origin to the Ming and Qing dynasties when imperial officials stationed in Beijing
Beijing
brought their private chefs and such different variety of culinary styles mixed and developed overtime and formed a unique breed of its own, and thus the Chinese aristocrat cuisine is often called private cuisine. The current Chinese aristocrat cuisine is a mixture of Shandong cuisine, Huaiyang cuisine and Cantonese cuisine. As Beijing
Beijing
was the capital of the last three Chinese dynasties, most of the Chinese aristocrat cuisine originated in Beijing
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Hubei Cuisine
Hubei cuisine, also known as E cuisine, is derived from the native cooking styles of Hubei Province in China.Contents1 History 2 Ingredients 3 Style 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Hubei cuisine has a history of more than 2,000 years. The names of dishes and cuisine styles can be found in ancient literature such as Chuci of Qu Yuan. Ingredients[edit] As Hubei has plenty of lakes, rivers and marshlands, freshwater produce are used as major ingredients in the local cuisine. A key ingredient that is found within many Hubei-style dishes is the lotus root.[1] Style[edit] Hubei cuisine emphasises on the preparation of ingredients and the matching of colours. It specialises in steaming techniques. Its style is influenced by the cooking methods of the cuisines of neighbouring provinces such as Sichuan and Hunan
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Puerto Rican Chinese Cuisine
Puerto Rican Chinese cuisine
Chinese cuisine
is a popular style of food exclusive to restaurants in Puerto Rico
Puerto Rico
developed by its Chinese immigrants. The food is a variation of Cantonese cuisine
Cantonese cuisine
with some elements of Puerto Rican cuisine. A typical dish consists of fried rice, a choice of meat, and French fries. The fried rice itself varies in every restaurant, but can contain many ingredients such as ham, beef, shrimp, egg, lettuce, and onions.Pollo al ajilloDishes[edit] Popular dishes in many Puerto Rican Chinese restaurants are:[1][2][3]Pollo al Ajillo — Chicken and onion slices in garlic and oil. Camarones al Ajillo — Shrimp
Shrimp
in garlic and oil. Carne Ahumada — Pieces of pork drenched in sweet red sauce
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