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Chinese Cuisine
CHINESE CUISINE is an important part of Chinese culture , which includes cuisine originating from the diverse regions of China , as well as from Chinese people in other parts of the world. Because of the Chinese diaspora and historical power of the country, Chinese cuisine has influenced many other cuisines in Asia , with modifications made to cater to local palates. The preference for seasoning and cooking techniques of Chinese provinces depend on differences in historical background and ethnic groups . Geographic features including mountains, rivers, forests and deserts also have a strong effect on the local available ingredients, considering climate of China varies from tropical in the south to subarctic in the northeast. Imperial, royal and noble preference also plays a role in the change of Chinese cuisines. Because of imperial expansion and trading, ingredients and cooking techniques from other cultures are integrated into Chinese cuisines over time. The most praised "Four Major Cuisines" are Chuan , Lu , Yue and Huaiyang , representing West, North, South and East China cuisine correspondingly. Modern "Eight Cuisines" of China are Anhui , Cantonese , Fujian , Hunan , Jiangsu , Shandong , Sichuan , and Zhejiang cuisines. Color, smell and taste are the three traditional aspects used to describe Chinese food, as well as the meaning, shape and nutrition of the food
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Chinese Food (other)
CHINESE FOOD refers to CHINESE CUISINE or food. CHINESE FOOD may also refer to: * "Chinese Food" (song) , a 2013 song that went viral by newcomer singer Alison Gold * China Foods Limited , or China Foods, formerly COFCO International Limited, company engaged in food processing and food trading * Chinese food therapy (or shíliáo), practice in the belief of healing through the use of natural foods instead of, or in addition to medicationsSEE ALSO * Chinese food box , or Chinese takeout container, an alternative name for Oyster pail * Chinese food syndrome , or Chinese restaurant syndrome (CRS) commonly associated to monosodium glutamate (MSG) * Chinese Food in Minutes , a British TV series, based upon Ching He Huang's cookbook of the same name * Chinese Food Made Easy , a British cooking television series by Ching He Huang This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title CHINESE FOOD. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article. Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Chinese_food_(other) additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc
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Chinese Regional Cuisine
CHINESE REGIONAL CUISINES are the different cuisines found in different provinces and prefectures of China
China
as well as from larger Chinese communities overseas. A number of different styles contribute to Chinese cuisine
Chinese cuisine
but perhaps the best known and most influential are Cantonese cuisine , Shandong cuisine
Shandong cuisine
, Jiangsu cuisine (specifically Huaiyang cuisine ) and Szechuan cuisine . These styles are distinctive from one another due to factors such as availability of resources, climate , geography , history , cooking techniques and lifestyle. One style may favour the use of lots of garlic and shallots over lots of chilli and spices, while another may favour preparing seafood over other meats and fowl . Jiangsu cuisine favours cooking techniques such as braising and stewing , while Sichuan cuisine
Sichuan cuisine
employs baking , just to name a few. Hairy crab is a highly sought after local delicacy in Shanghai
Shanghai
, as it can be found in lakes within the region. Peking duck and dim-sum are other popular dishes well known outside of China. Based on the raw materials and ingredients used, the method of preparation and cultural differences, a variety of foods with different flavors and textures are prepared in different regions of the country
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Sichuan Cuisine
SICHUAN CUISINE, SZECHWAN CUISINE, or SZECHUAN CUISINE (四川菜) (/ˈsɛʃwɒn/ or /ˈsɛtʃwɒn/ ), alternatively known as CHUAN CUISINE, is a style of Chinese cuisine
Chinese cuisine
originating from Sichuan Province in southwestern China
China
. It has bold flavours, particularly the pungency and spiciness resulting from liberal use of garlic and chili peppers , as well as the unique flavour of Sichuan
Sichuan
pepper . There are many local variations within Sichuan
Sichuan
Province and the neighbouring Chongqing
Chongqing
Municipality , which was part of Sichuan Province until 1997. Four sub-styles of Sichuan
Sichuan
cuisine include Chongqing, Chengdu
Chengdu
, Zigong and Buddhist
Buddhist
vegetarian style. UNESCO
UNESCO
declared Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan
Sichuan
Province, to be a city of gastronomy in 2011 to recognise the sophistication of its cooking. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Features * 3 Notable dishes * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 Further reading * 7 External links HISTORY Sichuan
Sichuan
in the Middle Ages welcomed Near Eastern crops, such as broad beans , sesame and walnuts
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Shandong Cuisine
SHANDONG CUISINE (山東菜), more commonly known in Chinese as LU CUISINE, is one of the Eight Culinary Traditions of Chinese cuisine and one of the Four Great Traditions (四大菜系). It is derived from the native cooking style of Shandong Province , a northern coastal province of China. CONTENTS * 1 Features * 2 Styles * 3 Influence * 4 Ingredients * 4.1 Maize
Maize
* 4.2 Peanuts * 4.3 Grains * 4.4 Staple vegetables * 4.5 Vinegar * 5 Subgroups of Shandong cuisine * 6 See also * 7 References FEATURES Shandong cuisine is famous for its wide selection of material and use of different cooking methods. The raw materials are mainly domestic animals and birds, seafood and vegetables. The masterly cooking techniques include bao (爆; quick frying), liu (溜; quick frying with corn flour), pa (扒; stewing), shao (烤; roasting), zhu (煮; boiling), and using sugar to make fruit and crystallising with honey. STYLES Shandong cuisine is divided into two sub-regional styles: Jinan and Jiaodong. Shandong cuisine is known for its light aroma, freshness and rich taste. It puts emphasis on two types of broths, light and milky. Both broths are seasoned with scallions and go well with the freshness of seafood
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Cantonese Cuisine
CANTONESE CUISINE (広東菜), also known as YUE CUISINE or GUANGDONG CUISINE, refers to the cuisine of China's Guangdong Province , particularly the provincial capital, Guangzhou (Canton) . It is one of the Eight Culinary Traditions of Chinese cuisine . Its prominence outside China is due to the large number of emigrants from Guangdong. Chefs trained in Cantonese cuisine are highly sought after throughout China. When Westerners speak of Chinese food, they usually refer to Cantonese cuisine
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Huaiyang Cuisine
HUAIYANG CUISINE (淮揚菜) is one of the Four Great Traditions in Chinese cuisine
Chinese cuisine
. It is derived from the native cooking styles of the region surrounding the lower reaches of the Huai and Yangtze rivers, and centred upon the cities of Huai\'an , Yangzhou
Yangzhou
and Zhenjiang in Jiangsu Province . Although it is one of several sub-regional styles within Jiangsu cuisine , Huaiyang cuisine
Huaiyang cuisine
is widely seen in Chinese culinary circles as the most popular and prestigious style of Jiangsu cuisine – to a point where it is considered to be among one of the Four Great Traditions (四大菜系; Sì dà càixì) that dominate the culinary heritage of China, along with Cantonese cuisine , Shandong cuisine
Shandong cuisine
and Sichuan cuisine
Sichuan cuisine
. CONTENTS * 1 Typical features * 2 Notable dishes * 3 Use in official dining * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links TYPICAL FEATURES Huaiyang cuisine
Huaiyang cuisine
characteristically bases each dish on its main ingredient, and the way that ingredient is cut is pivotal to its cooking and its final taste
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Anhui Cuisine
ANHUI CUISINE, alternatively referred to as HUI CUISINE, is one of the Eight Culinary Traditions of Chinese cuisine . It is derived from the native cooking styles of the Huangshan
Huangshan
region in southern Anhui Province , and is similar to Jiangsu cuisine . CONTENTS * 1 Methods and ingredients * 2 Notable dishes in Anhui
Anhui
cuisine * 3 See also * 4 References METHODS AND INGREDIENTS Anhui
Anhui
cuisine is known for its use of wild herbs, from both the land and the sea, and simple methods of preparation. Braising and stewing are common cooking techniques. Frying and stir frying are used much less frequently in Anhui
Anhui
cuisine than in other Chinese culinary traditions. Anhui
Anhui
cuisine consists of three styles: the Yangtze River region, Huai River region, and southern Anhui
Anhui
region. Anhui
Anhui
has ample uncultivated fields and forests, so the wild herbs used in the region's cuisine are readily available
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Fujian Cuisine
FUJIAN CUISINE, also known as MIN CUISINE or HOKKIEN CUISINE, is one of the native Chinese cuisines derived from the native cooking style of China
China
's Fujian Province , most notably from the provincial capital, Fuzhou
Fuzhou
. Fujian cuisine is known to be light but flavourful, soft, and tender, with particular emphasis on umami taste, known in Chinese cooking as xianwei (鲜味; 鮮味; xiān wèi), as well as retaining the original flavour of the main ingredients instead of masking them. Many diverse seafood and woodland delicacies are used, including a myriad variety of local fish, shellfish and turtles, or indigenous edible mushrooms and bamboo shoots , provided by the coastal and mountainous regions of Fujian. The most commonly employed cooking techniques in the region's cuisine include braising , stewing, steaming and boiling. Particular attention is paid on the finesse of knife skills and cooking technique of the chefs, which is used to enhance the flavour, aroma and texture of seafood and other foods. Strong emphasis is put on the making and utilising of broth and soups. There are sayings in the region's cuisine: "One broth can be changed into numerous (ten) forms" (一汤十变; -湯十變; yī tāng shí biàn) and "It is unacceptable for a meal to not have soup" (不汤不行; 不湯不行; bù tāng bù xíng)
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Hunan Cuisine
HUNAN CUISINE, also known as XIANG CUISINE, consists of the cuisines of the Xiang River region, Dongting Lake
Dongting Lake
and western Hunan Province in China. It is one of the Eight Great Traditions of Chinese cuisine
Chinese cuisine
and is well known for its hot and spicy flavours, fresh aroma and deep colours. Common cooking techniques include stewing , frying , pot-roasting , braising and smoking . Due to the high agricultural output of the region, ingredients for Hunan dishes are many and varied. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Features * 3 List of notable dishes * 4 See also * 5 References HISTORYThe history of the cooking skills employed in Hunan cuisine dates back to the 17th century. During the course of its history, Hunan cuisine assimilated a variety of local forms, eventually evolving into its own style. Some well-known dishes include fried chicken with Sichuan spicy sauce (麻辣鸡丁; 麻辣雞丁; málà jīdīng) and smoked pork with dried long green beans (干豆角蒸腊肉; 干豆角蒸臘肉; gāndòujiǎo zhēng làròu)
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Jiangsu Cuisine
JIANGSU CUISINE (蘇菜), also known as SU CUISINE, is one of the Eight Culinary Traditions of Chinese cuisine . It is derived from the native cooking styles of Jiangsu Province . In general, Jiangsu cuisine's texture is characterised as soft, but not to the point of mushy or falling apart. For example, the meat tastes quite soft but would not separate from the bone when picked up. As the style of Jiangsu cuisine is typically practised near the sea, fish is a very common ingredient in cooking. Other characteristics include the strict selection of ingredients according to the seasons, with emphasis on the matching colour and shape of each dish and using soup to improve flavour. CONTENTS* 1 Regional variations * 1.1 Wuxi style cuisine * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 External links REGIONAL VARIATIONS Jiangsu cuisine is sometimes simply called Su cuisine, and one of its major styles is Huaiyang cuisine . Although Huaiyang cuisine is one of several sub-regional styles within Jiangsu cuisine, it is widely seen in Chinese culinary circles as the most popular and prestigious style of Jiangsu cuisine – to a point where it is considered to be among one of the four most influential regional schools (四大菜系) that dominate the culinary heritage of China, along with Cantonese cuisine , Shandong cuisine and Sichuan cuisine
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Zhejiang Cuisine
ZHEJIANG CUISINE, alternatively known as ZHE CUISINE, is one of the Eight Culinary Traditions of Chinese cuisine
Chinese cuisine
. It derives from the traditional ways of cooking in Zhejiang Province , which is located south of Shanghai
Shanghai
and centred around Hangzhou
Hangzhou
, a historical Chinese capital . In general, Zhejiang cuisine is not greasy but has a fresh and soft flavour with a mellow fragrance. STYLES Zhejiang cuisine consists of at least three styles, each originating from a major city in the province: * Hangzhou
Hangzhou
style: Characterised by rich variations and the use of bamboo shoots. It is served in restaurants such as the Dragon Well Manor . * Shaoxing
Shaoxing
style: Specialising in poultry and freshwater fish. * Ningbo style: Specialising in seafood, with emphasis on freshness and salty dishes.Some sources also include the Wenzhou style as a separate subdivision due to its proximity to Fujian Province . Wenzhou style is characterised as the greatest source of seafood as well as poultry and livestock. NOTABLE DISHES ENGLISH TRADITIONAL CHINESE SIMPLIFIED CHINESE PINYIN PICTURE NOTES A hundred birds facing the Phoenix 百鳥朝鳳 百鸟朝凤 bǎi niǎo cháo fèng Xiaoshan chicken is stewed in a claypot
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Beijing Cuisine
BEIJING CUISINE, also known as JING CUISINE and MANDARIN CUISINE, and as BEIPING CUISINE in Taiwan, is the local cuisine of Beijing , the national capital of China. CONTENTS * 1 Background * 2 History * 2.1 Zhuang * 2.2 Tang * 2.3 Ting * 2.4 Yuan * 2.5 Lou * 2.6 Ju * 2.7 Zhai * 2.8 Fang * 2.9 Guan * 2.10 Dian * 2.11 Pu * 2.12 Tan * 3 Notable dishes and street foods * 3.1 Meat and poultry dishes * 3.2 Fish and seafood dishes * 3.3 Noodles (both vegetarian and non-vegetarian) * 3.4 Pastries * 3.5 Vegetarian * 4 Restaurants known for Beijing cuisine * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links BACKGROUNDAs Beijing has been the capital of China for centuries, its cuisine is influenced by culinary traditions from all over China, but the style that has the greatest influence on Beijing cuisine is that of the eastern coastal province of Shandong . Beijing cuisine has itself, in turn, also greatly influenced other Chinese cuisines, particularly the cuisine of Liaoning , the Chinese imperial cuisine , and the Chinese aristocrat cuisine
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Shanghai Cuisine
SHANGHAI CUISINE (上海菜), also known as HU CUISINE, is a popular style of Chinese food . In a narrow sense, Shanghai cuisine refers only to what is traditionally called BENBANG CUISINE (本帮菜; _Běnbāng cài_; "local cuisine") which originated in Shanghai; in a broad sense, it refers to complex and developed styles of cooking under profound influence of those of the surrounding provinces, Jiangsu and Zhejiang . It takes "colour, aroma and taste" as its elements, like other Chinese regional cuisines, and emphasises in particular the use of seasonings, the quality of raw ingredients and original flavours. CONTENTS * 1 Characteristic * 2 History * 3 Notable dishes in Shanghai cuisine * 3.1 Seafood * 3.2 Meat and poultry * 3.3 Snacks * 3.4 Soup * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links CHARACTERISTICShanghai dishes usually appear red and shiny because they are often pickled in wine. They are cooked using a variety of methods including baking, stewing, braising, steaming and deep-frying. Fish, crab and chicken are made "drunken" with spirits and briskly cooked, steamed or served raw. Salted meats and preserved vegetables are also commonly used to enhance various dishes. Sugar is an important ingredient in Shanghai cuisine, especially when used in combination with soy sauce. Another characteristic is the use of a great variety of seafood
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Henan Cuisine
HENAN CUISINE, also known as YU CUISINE, is derived from the native cooking styles of Henan Province in China. It is a cross between Jiangsu cuisine , with which it shares the trait of selecting ingredients according to the four seasons, and to a lesser extent, Beijing cuisine , from which it adopted many cooking methods. The result is that Henan dishes are very seasonal, and taste lighter in comparison to Beijing cuisine, similar to Jiangsu cuisine. Some characteristics of Henan cuisine include: * The wide use of onions. * Pork is the most commonly used type of meat in Henan cuisine but is seldom served in soups; mutton and lamb are mainly served in soups. * Rice is the major food, but Henan cuisine is unique in that rice is served with oil produced from animal fat (though this practice is diminishing due to health concerns). * Although noodles are cooked similarly to other northern Chinese cuisines, Henan cuisine is unique in that it uses rice vermicelli , which is mostly used in Southern Chinese and Southeast Asian cuisines. This article related to Chinese cuisine
Chinese cuisine
is a stub . You can help by expanding it . * v * t * e Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Henan_cuisine additional terms may apply
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Shaanxi Cuisine
SHAANXI CUISINE, or QIN CUISINE, is derived from the native cooking styles of Shaanxi Province and parts of northwestern China . CONTENTS * 1 Description * 2 Regional styles * 3 Notable dishes * 4 References DESCRIPTION Shaanxi cuisine makes elaborate use of ordinary materials, and is best known for its pork and lamb/mutton dishes. The flavour is strong and the taste is heavy. There is an emphasis on savoury flavours such as salt, garlic, onion and vinegar; sugar is seldom used. The main cooking methods are steaming, frying and stir-frying. Due to its geographical location between the provinces of Shanxi and Sichuan
Sichuan
, the taste of Shaanxi cuisine include both sour and spicy, in addition to the salty taste. In comparison to other Chinese cuisines, noodles are more widely used than rice, but in contrast to the noodles of Beijing cuisine , and to a certain degree, Shanxi cuisine , the noodles of Shaanxi cuisine are nearly always wider, thicker and longer. The taste of " Shaanxi cuisine" can be quite spicy. However, this can be diluted by adding a little soy sauce to the cuisine. Furthermore, different types of meat can be included in " Shaanxi cuisine" such as duck, lamb, chicken or beef. Additionally, there are vegetarian options in which no meat is included, but rather more spices resulting in spicier dishes
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