HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Children’s Literature
Children's literature
Children's literature
or juvenile literature includes stories, books, magazines, and poems that are enjoyed by children. Modern children's literature is classified in two different ways: genre or the intended age of the reader. Children's literature
Children's literature
can be traced to stories and songs, part of a wider oral tradition, that adults shared with children before publishing existed. The development of early children's literature, before printing was invented, is difficult to trace. Even after printing became widespread, many classic "children's" tales were originally created for adults and later adapted for a younger audience. Since the 15th century, a large quantity of literature, often with a moral or religious message, has been aimed specifically at children
[...More...]

"Children’s Literature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The New England Primer
The New England Primer
The New England Primer
was the first reading primer designed for the American Colonies. It became the most successful educational textbook published in 17th century colonial United States and it became the foundation of most schooling before the 1790s. In the 17th century, the schoolbooks in use had been brought over from England. By 1690, Boston publishers were reprinting the English Protestant Tutor under the title of The New England Primer
[...More...]

"The New England Primer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Pilgrim's Progress
The Pilgrim's Progress
Pilgrim's Progress
from This World, to That Which Is to Come is a 1678 Christian
Christian
allegory written by John Bunyan. It is regarded as one of the most significant works of religious English literature,[1][2][3][4] has been translated into more than 200 languages, and has never been out of print.[5][6] It has also been cited as the first novel written in English.[7] Bunyan began his work while in the Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
county prison for violations of the Conventicle Act, which prohibited the holding of religious services outside the auspices of the established Church of England
[...More...]

"The Pilgrim's Progress" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Morality
Morality
Morality
(from Latin: mōrālis, lit. 'manner, character, proper behavior') is the differentiation of intentions, decisions and actions between those that are distinguished as proper and those that are improper.[1] Morality
Morality
can be a body of standards or principles derived from a code of conduct from a particular philosophy, religion or culture, or it can derive from a standard that a person believes should be universal.[2] Morality
Morality
may also be specifically synonymous with "goodness" or "rightness". Moral philosophy includes moral ontology, which is the origin of morals; and moral epistemology, which is the knowledge of morals. Different systems of expressing morality have been proposed, including deontological ethical systems which adhere to a set of established rules, and normative ethical systems which consider the merits of actions themselves
[...More...]

"Morality" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Conduct Book
Conduct books are a genre of books that attempt to educate the reader on social norms. As a genre, they began in the mid-to-late Middle Ages, although antecedents such as The Maxims of Ptahhotep (ca. 2350 BC) are among the earliest surviving works. Conduct books remained popular through the 18th century, although they gradually declined with the advent of the novel. See also[edit]Courtesy book Mirrors for princes Nasîhatnâme Self-help Wisdom literatureReferences[edit]Literary Encyclopedia: Conduct Book Review of The Crisis of Courtesy: Studies in the Conduct-Book in Britain, 1600-1900 by Jacques CarrePublications[edit]A Collection of Conduct Books for Girls and Boys in 19th century America in 5 vols., edited by Toshiko Nonomura. ISBN 978-4-86166-044-3This article about a literary genre is a stub
[...More...]

"Conduct Book" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Religious Book
Religious texts (also known as scripture, or scriptures, from the Latin
Latin
scriptura, meaning "writing") are texts which religious traditions consider to be central to their practice or beliefs. Religious texts may be used to provide meaning and purpose, evoke a deeper connection with the divine, convey religious truths, promote religious experience, foster communal identity, and guide individual and communal religious practice
[...More...]

"Religious Book" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hornbook
A hornbook is a book that serves as primer for study. The hornbook originated in England as long ago as 1450,[1] or earlier.[2] The term has been applied to a few different study materials in different fields. In children's education, in the years before modern educational materials were used, it referred to a leaf or page displaying the alphabet, religious materials, etc., covered with a transparent sheet of horn (or mica) and attached to a frame provided with a handle.[3]Contents1 Use in United States
United States
legal education 2 Use in early childhood education 3 In art, entertainment, and media 4 References 5 External linksUse in United States
United States
legal education[edit] Main article: Hornbook
Hornbook
(law) In United States
United States
law, a hornbook is a text that gives an overview of a particular area of law
[...More...]

"Hornbook" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Locke
John Locke
John Locke
FRS (/lɒk/; 29 August 1632 – 28 October 1704) was an English philosopher and physician, widely regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers and commonly known as the "Father of Liberalism".[1][2][3] Considered one of the first of the British empiricists, following the tradition of Sir Francis Bacon, he is equally important to social contract theory. His work greatly affected the development of epistemology and political philosophy. His writings influenced Voltaire
Voltaire
and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, many Scottish Enlightenment thinkers, as well as the American revolutionaries
[...More...]

"John Locke" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tabula Rasa
Tabula rasa
Tabula rasa
(/ˈtæbjələ ˈrɑːsə, -zə, ˈreɪ-/) refers to the epistemological idea that individuals are born without built-in mental content and that therefore all knowledge comes from experience or perception. Proponents of tabula rasa generally disagree with the doctrine of innatism which holds that the mind is born already in possession of certain knowledge
[...More...]

"Tabula Rasa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

An Essay Concerning Human Understanding
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding
is a work by John Locke concerning the foundation of human knowledge and understanding. It first appeared in 1689 (although dated 1690) with the printed title An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding. He describes the mind at birth as a blank slate (tabula rasa, although he did not use those actual words) filled later through experience. The essay was one of the principal sources of empiricism in modern philosophy, and influenced many enlightenment philosophers, such as David Hume
David Hume
and George Berkeley. Book I of the Essay is Locke's attempt to refute the rationalist notion of innate ideas
[...More...]

"An Essay Concerning Human Understanding" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sense
A sense is a physiological capacity of organisms that provides data for perception. The senses and their operation, classification, and theory are overlapping topics studied by a variety of fields, most notably neuroscience, cognitive psychology (or cognitive science), and philosophy of perception. The nervous system has a specific sensory nervous system, and a sense organ, or sensor, dedicated to each sense. Humans have a multitude of sensors. Sight (vision), hearing (audition), taste (gustation), smell (olfaction), and touch (somatosensation) are the five traditionally recognized senses. The ability to detect other stimuli beyond those governed by these most broadly recognized senses also exists, and these sensory modalities include temperature (thermoception), kinesthetic sense (proprioception), pain (nociception), balance (equilibrioception), vibration (mechanoreception), and various internal stimuli (e.g
[...More...]

"Sense" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Puritanism
The Puritans
Puritans
were English Reformed
Reformed
Protestants
[...More...]

"Puritanism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

James Janeway
James Janeway
James Janeway
(1636–1674) was a Puritan
Puritan
minister and author who, after John Bunyan, had the widest and longest popularity as the author of works read by English-speaking children.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Published works 3 Notes 4 External linksLife[edit] Janeway was born at Lilley, in Hertfordshire, the son of William Janeway, a minister of Kershall, at the end of 1636. He was educated at Christ Church, Oxford, graduating with a B.A. and spent time as a private tutor in a home, like many of the Puritans. He is listed as one of the "ejected" or "silenced" ministers by the Act of Uniformity 1662.[2] The first evidence that he functioned as a non-conformist preacher is from the year 1665 at the time of the Great Plague of London
[...More...]

"James Janeway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Bunyan
John Bunyan
John Bunyan
(/ˈbʌnjən/; baptised on November 30, 1628 – August 31, 1688) was an English writer and Puritan
Puritan
preacher[1] best remembered as the author of the Christian allegory The Pilgrim's Progress. In addition to The Pilgrim's Progress, Bunyan wrote nearly sixty titles, many of them expanded sermons. Bunyan came from the village of Elstow, near Bedford. He had some schooling and at the age of sixteen joined the Parliamentary army during the first stage of the English Civil War. After three years in the army he returned to Elstow
Elstow
and took up the trade of tinker, which he had learned from his father. He became interested in religion after his marriage, attending first the parish church and then joining the Bedford
Bedford
Meeting, a nonconformist group in Bedford, and becoming a preacher
[...More...]

"John Bunyan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Play Of Daniel
The Play of Daniel, or Ludus Danielis, is either of two medieval Latin liturgical dramas based on the biblical Book of Daniel, one of which is accompanied by monophonic music. Two medieval plays of Daniel survive. The first is one of the plays in the Fleury Playbook, a 13th-century manuscript containing ten liturgical dramas; the text is by Hilarius, and no music accompanies it. The play itself dates from c. 1140. The second is a 13th-century drama with monophonic music, written about 1227 to 1234 by students at the school of Beauvais Cathedral, located in northern France.[1] A large portion of the text is poetic rather than strictly liturgical in origin; it closely follows the narrative of the biblical story of Daniel at the court of Belshazzar.[2] In USA the latter play was revived in the 1950s by Noah Greenberg, director of the New York Pro Musica; a commentary in English, written and performed by W. H
[...More...]

"Play Of Daniel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chapbook
A chapbook is a type of popular literature printed in early modern Europe. Produced cheaply, chapbooks were commonly small, paper-covered booklets, usually printed on a single sheet folded into books of 8, 12, 16 and 24 pages. They were often illustrated with crude woodcuts, which sometimes bore no relation to the text. When illustrations were included in chapbooks, they were considered popular prints. The tradition of chapbooks arose in the 16th century, as soon as printed books became affordable, and rose to its height during the 17th and 18th centuries. Many different kinds of ephemera and popular or folk literature were published as chapbooks, such as almanacs, children's literature, folk tales, ballads, nursery rhymes, pamphlets, poetry, and political and religious tracts. The term "chapbook" for this type of literature was coined in the 19th century. The corresponding French and German terms are bibliothèque bleue (blue book) and Volksbuch, respectively
[...More...]

"Chapbook" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.