HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

Middle Passage
The Middle Passage was the stage of the triangular trade in which millions of Africans[1] were forcibly transported to the New World as part of the Atlantic slave trade. Ships departed Europe for African markets with manufactured goods, which were traded for purchased or kidnapped Africans, who were transported across the Atlantic as slaves; the enslaved Africans were then sold or traded for raw materials,[2] which would be transported back to Europe to complete the voyage. The First Passage was the transportation of captives (slaves) to the African ports, such as Elmina, where they would be loaded onto ships. The Final Passage was the journey from the port of disembarkation, such as Charleston, to the plantation or other destination where they would be put to work. The Middle Passage across the Atlantic joined these two
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Slavery In The Byzantine Empire
Slavery was common in the early Roman Empire and Classical Greece. It was legal in the Byzantine Empire but became rare after the first half of 7th century.[1] From 11th century, semi-feudal relations largely replaced slavery.[2] Under the influence of Christianity, views of slavery shifted: by the 10th century slaves were viewed as potential citizens (the slave as a subject), rather than property or chattel (the slave as an object).[3] Slavery was also seen as "an evil contrary to nature, created by man's selfishness", although it remained legal.[4] A main source of slaves were prisoners of war, of which there was a great profit to be made.[5] The Synopsis of Histories mentions that after the Battle of Adrassos many prisoners of war were sent to Constantinople
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Turkish Abductions
The Turkish Abductions (Icelandic: Tyrkjaránið) were a series of slave raids by Ottoman pirates that took place in Iceland between 20 June and 19 July 1627.[1] Pirates from Algeria, under the command of Dutch pirate Murat Reis, raided the village of Grindavík on the southwestern coast, Berufjörður and Breiðdalur in the Eastern Region (the East Fjords), and Vestmannaeyjar (islands off the south coast); they captured an estimated 400–800 prisoners to sell into slavery. In 1627 Barbary corsairs from Algiers and Salé descended on Iceland in two separate raids, taking around 400–900 prisoners (Iceland's population at the time has been estimated to have been about 60,000). This event is popularly known in Iceland as Tyrkjaránið (the "Turkish Raid"), as it was launched from areas under Ottoman sovereignty, although no North African Turks are known to have been involved
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Harem
Harem (Arabic: حريمḥarīm, "a sacred inviolable place; harem; female members of the family"),[1][2] properly refers to domestic spaces that are reserved for the women of the house in a Muslim family.[3][4][5] This private space has been traditionally understood as serving the purposes of maintaining the modesty, privilege, and protection of women. A harem may house a man's wife or wives, their pre-pubescent male children, unmarried daughters, female domestic workers, and other unmarried female relatives. In royal harems of the past, concubines of the prince were also housed in the harem. In former times some harems were guarded by eunuchs who were allowed inside
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Ottoman Imperial Harem
The Imperial Harem (Ottoman Turkish: حرم همايون‎, Harem-i Hümâyûn) of the Ottoman Empire was the Ottoman sultan's harem – composed of the wives, servants (both female slaves and eunuchs), female relatives and the sultan's concubines – occupying a secluded portion (seraglio) of the Ottoman imperial household.[1] This institution played an important social function within the Ottoman court, and wielded considerable political authority in Ottoman affairs, especially during the long period known as the Sultanate of Women[2] (approximately 1533 to 1656)
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Kholop
A kholop (Russian: холо́п, IPA: [xɐˈlop]) was a type of feudal serf in Russia between the 10th and early 18th centuries. Their legal status was close to that of slaves.[1] The word kholop was first mentioned in a chronicle for the year of 986. Its etymology is unclear. By one hypothesis, the word is cognate with Slavic words translated as "boy" (more specifically, adolescent male; modern Ukrainian: хлопець (khlopets), Polish: chłopiec, Bulgarian: хлапе/хлапак), which is similar to the use of the English word boy as "servant". The Slavic word itself is derived from the hypothetical root *chol related to premarital state, unmarriedness, inability for reproduction
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]