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Chiang Rai Province
Chiang Rai
Chiang Rai
(Thai: เชียงราย, pronounced [t͡ɕʰīaŋ.rāːj]; Lanna: ᨩ᩠ᨿᨦᩁᩣ᩠ᨿ, pronounced [tɕiaŋ.haːj] is the northernmost province of Thailand
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Wikivoyage
Wikivoyage
Wikivoyage
is a free web-based travel guide for travel destinations and travel topics written by volunteer authors. It is a sister project of and supported and hosted by the same non-profit Wikimedia Foundation. Wikivoyage
Wikivoyage
has been called the "of travel guides".[2] The project was started when editors at the German and then Italian versions of Wikitravel
Wikitravel
decided in September 2006 to move their editing activities and then current content to a new site, in accordance with the site copyright license, a procedure known as "forking". The resulting site went live as "Wikivoyage" on December 10, 2006 and was owned and operated by a German association set up for that purpose, Wikivoyage
Wikivoyage
e.V. (which continues to be its representative association)
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Kuomintang
The Kuomintang
Kuomintang
of China[6][7] (/ˈkwoʊˌmɪnˈtɑːŋ, -ˈtæŋ/,[8] KMT; often translated as the Nationalist Party of China)[9] is a major political party in the Republic of China
Republic of China
(ROC or Taiwan). The predecessor of the KMT, the Revolutionary Alliance
Revolutionary Alliance
(Tongmenghui), was one of the major advocates of the overthrow of the Qing Dynasty and the establishment of the Republic
Republic
of China. The KMT was founded by Song Jiaoren
Song Jiaoren
and Sun Yat-sen
Sun Yat-sen
shortly after the Xinhai Revolution
Xinhai Revolution
of 1911. Sun was the provisional President, but he later ceded the presidency to Yuan Shikai
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Mae Sai River
Sai River (Thai: แม่สาย or แม่น้ำสาย; RTGS: Mae Sai or Maenam Sai; Thai pronunciation: [mɛ̂ː.sǎːj / mɛ̂ː.náːm.sǎːj]), formerly known as the River of Lawa (Thai: แม่ละว้า; RTGS: Mae Lawa),[1] is a river that forms the natural border between Thailand and Myanmar at Tachileik and Mae Sai Districts. Mae Sai town, where the bridge crossing the international border is located, is named after this river. It is a tributary of the Ruak River, itself a tributary of the Mekong. Course[edit] The river has its sources in the Daen Lao Range, in Shan State, Myanmar
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Thai Highlands
The Thai highlands
Thai highlands
or Hills of northern Thailand, Thai: เขตภูเขา (ประเทศไทย), is a mountainous natural region in the north of Thailand. Its mountain ranges are part of the system of hills extending through Laos, Burma, and China
China
and linking to the Himalayas, of which they may be considered foothills. The highlands in the north of Thailand
Thailand
are characterized by a pattern of generally steep hill ranges, intermontane basins and alluvial gorges. Elevations are generally moderate, little above 2,000 metres (6,600 ft) for the highest summits. There is a wide range of elevations though, with floors ranging between 200 and 500 metres (660 and 1,640 ft) above sea level
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Lanna
The Lan Na
Lan Na
or Lanna Kingdom (Lanna: , Northern Thai pronunciation: [ʔaː.naː.tɕǎk.láːn.naː], "Kingdom of a Million Rice Fields"; Thai: อาณาจักรล้านนา, RTGS: Anachak Lan Na, Thai pronunciation: [ʔaː naː tɕàk láːn naː]; Lao: ອານາຈັກລ້ານນາ, Burmese: ဇင္းမယ္ျပည္, IPA: [zɪ́ɴmɛ̀ pjì] or ယြန္းျပည္, IPA: [yʊ́ɴ pjì]), also known as Lannathai, was an Indianized state centered in present-day Northern Thailand
Thailand
from the 13th to 18th centuries. The Pali
Pali
chronicles refer to the kingdom as Yonarattha or Yonkarattha (Kingdom of the Yuon) or Bingarattha (Kingdom of the Mae Ping)
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Thai People
Thai people
Thai people
or the Thais (Thai: ชาวไทย), also known as Siamese (Thai: ไทยสยาม), are a nation and Tai ethnic group native to Southeast Asia, primarily living mainly Central Thailand
Thailand
(Siamese proper)[23][24][25][26][27][2][28]. As a part of the larger Tai ethnolinguistic group native to Southeast Asia
Southeast Asia
as well as southern China
China
and Northeast India, Thais speak the Central Thai language, [29] and is classified as part of the Tai–Kadai family of languages
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Hill Tribe (Thailand)
Hill tribe (Thai: ชาวดอย, ชาวเขา, คนเขา,, Thai pronunciation: [tɕʰāːw.dɔ̄ːj, tɕʰāːw.kʰǎw, kʰōn.kʰǎw]) (Northern Thai: จาวดอย, คนดอย, Northern Thai pronunciation: [t͡ɕāːw.dɔ̄ːj, xōn.dɔ̄ːj]; "mountain people/folk")[1][2] is a term used in Thailand
Thailand
for all of the various ethnic groups who mostly inhabit the high mountainous Northern and Western regions of Thailand, including both sides of the border areas between Northern Thailand, Laos
Laos
and Burma, the Phi Pan Nam Range, the Thanon Range, the latter a southern prolongation of the Shan Hills, as well as the Tenasserim Hills
Tenasserim Hills
in Western Thailand
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Thai Chinese
9,349,900 (est) 14 percent of the Thai population (2012)[1] up to 26,000,000 Thais of at least partial Chinese descent (around 40 percent of the Thai population) (2012)[2]Regions with significant populations Thailand Bangkok, Phuket, Chiang Mai, Hat Yai, SongkhlaLanguagesThai, Southern Thai historically Southern Min
Southern Min
(Teochew and Hokkien), Hainanese, Hakka and CantoneseReligionPredominantly Theravada
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White Elephant
A white elephant is a possession which its owner cannot dispose of and whose cost, particularly that of maintenance, is out of proportion to its usefulness
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Golden Triangle (Southeast Asia)
The Golden Triangle (Burmese: ရွှေတြိဂံ နယ်မြေ, pronounced [ʃwè tɹḭɡàɴ nɛ̀mjè]; Thai: สามเหลี่ยมทองคำ, RTGS: sam liam thong kham, pronounced [sǎːm.lìa̯m tʰɔ̄ːŋ kʰām]; Lao: ສາມຫຼ່ຽມທອງຄຳ; Chinese: 金三角; Vietnamese: Tam giác Vàng; Khmer: តំបន់ត្រីកោណមាស, pronounced [tɑmbɑn trəy kaon mieh]) refers to the area where the borders of Thailand, Laos, and Myanmar meet at the confluence of the Ruak and Mekong Rivers.[1] The name "Golden Triangle"—coined by the CIA[2]—is commonly used more broadly to refer to an area of approximately 950,000 square kilometres (367,000 sq mi) that overlaps the mountains of three adjacent countries. Along with Afghanistan
Afghanistan
in the Golden Crescent, it has been one of the most extensive opium-producing areas of Asia, and of the world, since the 1950s
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Mangrai
Mangrai
Mangrai
(Lanna: ; Thai: มังราย; 1238–1311), also known as Mengrai (Thai: เม็งราย),[Note 1] was the 25th king of Ngoenyang
Ngoenyang
(r. 1261–1292) and the first king of Lanna (r. 1292–1311)
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Pyrostegia Venusta
Pyrostegia venusta, also commonly known as flamevine[2] or orange trumpetvine, is a plant species of the genus Pyrostegia of the family Bignoniaceae originally endemic to Brazil, but nowadays a well-known garden species.[3][4]Contents1 Taxonomic history 2 Gallery 3 References 4 External linksTaxonomic history[edit] The species was first described by John Miers in 1863. Gallery[edit]Pyrostegia venusta_leaves and flowersReferences[edit]^ The Plant List: A Working List of All Plant Species, retrieved 8 September 2016  ^ "Pyrostegia venusta". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 16 October 2015.  ^ Proceedings of the Royal Horticultural Society of London 3:188. 1863 ^ "Pyrostegia venusta". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
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Litchi
Lychee
Lychee
(variously spelled litchi, liechee, liche, lizhi or li zhi, or lichee) (Litchi chinensis; Chinese: 荔枝; pinyin: lìzhī) is the sole member of the genus Litchi in the soapberry family, Sapindaceae. It is a tropical tree native to the Guangdong
Guangdong
and Fujian
Fujian
provinces of China, where cultivation is documented from 1059 AD. China
China
is the main producer of lychees, followed by India, other countries in Southeast Asia, the Indian Subcontinent
Indian Subcontinent
and South Africa. A tall evergreen tree, the lychee bears small fleshy fruits. The outside of the fruit is pink-red, roughly textured and inedible, covering sweet flesh eaten in many different dessert dishes. Since the perfume-like flavor is lost in the process of canning, the fruit is usually eaten fresh. Lychee
Lychee
contains many phytochemicals
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Giant Mekong Catfish
The Mekong giant catfish (Pangasianodon gigas; Thai: ปลาบึก, RTGS: pla buek, pronounced [plāː bɯ̀k]; Khmer: ត្រីរាជ /trəy riec/; Vietnamese: cá tra dầu), is a large, critically endangered species of catfish (order Siluriformes) in the shark catfish family (Pangasiidae), native to the Mekong basin in Southeast Asia and adjacent China
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Amphoe
An amphoe (sometimes also amphur, Thai: อำเภอ, pronounced [ʔām.pʰɤ̄ː]) is the second level administrative subdivision of Thailand. Usually translated as "district". Amphoe make up the provinces, and are analogous to counties. The chief district officer is Nai Amphoe (นายอำเภอ). Amphoe are divided into tambons, or sub-districts. Altogether Thailand
Thailand
has 878 districts, not including the 50 districts of Bangkok
Bangkok
which are called khet (เขต) since the Bangkok administrative reform of 1972. The number of amphoe in provinces varies, from only three in the smallest provinces, up to the 50 urban districts of Bangkok. Also the sizes and population of amphoe differ greatly
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