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Chester Wilmott
Reginald William Winchester Wilmot (21 June 1911 – 10 January 1954) was an Australian war correspondent who reported for the BBC
BBC
and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation
Australian Broadcasting Corporation
during the Second World War. After the war he continued to work as a broadcast reporter, and wrote a well-appreciated book about the liberation of Europe. He was killed in the crash of a BOAC Comet over the Mediterranean Sea.Contents1 Early life 2 War reporter 3 BBC
BBC
work 4 Military historian 5 Broadcaster 6 Death 7 Books 8 Notes 9 References 10 Further readingEarly life[edit] Wilmot was born in Brighton, a suburb of Melbourne; he was the son of Reginald "Old Boy" Wilmot, a well-known sports journalist
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Brighton, Victoria
Brighton
Brighton
is an affluent coastal suburb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 11 km south-east of Melbourne's central business district.[2] Its local government area is the City of Bayside. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, Brighton
Brighton
had a population of 23,253 people in 2016[3]. Brighton
Brighton
is named after Brighton
Brighton
in England.[4] Brighton
Brighton
houses some of the wealthiest citizens in Melbourne
Melbourne
with grand homes, and the development of large residential blocks of land. Brighton
Brighton
is also well known for its Dendy Street Beach with its 82 colourful beach boxes
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Second Battle Of El Alamein
 United Kingdom India  Palestine Australia  New Zealand  South Africa  Free French Free Greeks   United States
United States
(air support)[1][2]Commanders and leaders Ettore Bastico Georg Stumme † Erwin Rommel Harold Alexander Bernard MontgomeryStrength116,000 men[3][a] 547 tanks[b] 192 armoured cars[4] 770[6] – 900 aircraft (480 serviceable)[c] 552 artillery pieces[8] 496 anti-tank guns[d] – 1,063[10] 195,000 men[4] 1,029 tanks[e] 435 armoured cars[4] 730[f] – 750 aircraft (530 servi
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Osmar White
Osmar Egmont Dorkin White (2 April 1909 – 16 May 1991) was an Australian journalist, war correspondent and writer. He is most famous for his vivid description of the New Guinea Campaign
New Guinea Campaign
during World War II. He also wrote under the pseudonyms Robert Dentry, EM Dorkin, and Maros Gray.Contents1 Early life 2 Professional background 3 World War II 4 Retirement years 5 Works 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Born in Feilding, New Zealand, White moved with his family to Australia at age five and spent his childhood in Katoomba. Professional background[edit] He began his career as a journalist with the Cumberland Times in Parramatta, New South Wales, before moving to the Wagga Wagga Advertiser. He also wrote for the Sydney Daily Telegraph
Sydney Daily Telegraph
as a district correspondent while studying at the University of Sydney
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Damien Parer
Damien Peter Parer (1 August 1912 – 17 September 1944) was an Australian war photographer. He became famous for his war photography of the Second World War, and was killed by Japanese machine-gun fire at Peleliu, Palau. He was cinematographer for Australia's first Oscar-winning film, Kokoda Front Line!, an edition of the weekly newsreel, Cinesound Review, which was produced by Ken G. Hall.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal 4 In popular culture 5 Filmography 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Damien Parer
Damien Parer
was born at Malvern in Melbourne, the eighth child of John Arthur Parer, a Spanish-Catalan born hotel manager on King Island and his wife Teresa. In 1923, he and his brother Adrian were sent as boarders to St Stanislaus' College in Bathurst and St Kevin's College, Melbourne.[1] He joined the school's camera club, and decided that he wanted to be a photographer, rather than a priest
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Thomas Blamey
Field Marshal Sir Thomas Albert Blamey, GBE, KCB, CMG, DSO, ED (24 January 1884 – 27 May 1951) was an Australian general of the First and Second World Wars, and the only Australian to attain the rank of field marshal. Blamey joined the Australian Army
Australian Army
as a regular soldier in 1906, and attended the Staff College at Quetta. During the First World War
First World War
he participated in the landing at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, and served as a staff officer in the Gallipoli Campaign, where he was mentioned in despatches for a daring raid behind enemy lines. He later served on the Western Front, where he distinguished himself in the planning for the Battle of Pozières
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Sydney Rowell
First World WarGallipoli CampaignSecond World WarWestern Desert Campaign Battle of Greece Syria-Lebanon campaign Kokoda Track
Kokoda Track
campaignKorean WarAwards Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire Companion of the Order of the Bath Mentioned in Despatches
Mentioned in Despatches
(2) Greek War Cross
Greek War Cross
(Class A)Other work Director, Smith, Elder & Co. Director and Chairman, Commonwealth Aircraft CorporationLieutenant General Sir Sydney
Sydney
Fairbairn Rowell, KBE, CB (15 December 1894 – 12 April 1975) was an Australian soldier who served as Chief of the General Staff from 17 April 1950 to 15 December 1954. As Vice Chief of the General Staff from 8 January 1946 to 16 April 1950, he played a key role in the post-Second World War reorganisation of the Army, and in the 1949 Australian coal strike
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Sydney
Sydney
Sydney
(/ˈsɪdni/ ( listen))[7] is the state capital of New South Wales
Wales
and the most populous city in Australia
Australia
and Oceania.[8] Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds the world's largest natural harbour and sprawls about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north and Macarthur to the south.[9] Sydney
Sydney
is made up of 658 suburbs, 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions
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ANZAC
The Australian and New Zealand
New Zealand
Army
Army
Corps
Corps
(ANZAC) was a First World War army corps of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force. It was formed in Egypt
Egypt
in December 1914, and operated during the Battle of Gallipoli. General William Birdwood
William Birdwood
commanded the corps, which comprised troops from the First Australian Imperial Force
First Australian Imperial Force
and 1st New Zealand Expeditionary Force. The corps disbanded in 1916, following the Allied evacuation of the Gallipoli peninsula and the formation of I ANZAC Corps
Corps
and II ANZAC Corps
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Operation Overlord
Civilian deaths:11,000–19,000 killed in pre-invasion bombing[21] 13,632–19,890 killed during invasion[22] Total: 25,000–39,000 killedv t eOperation Overlord Invasion of NormandyPreludeAtlantic Wall BodyguardFortitude Zeppelin Titanic Taxable, Glimmer & Big DrumCombined Bomber Offensive Pointblank Transport PlanPostage Able Tarbrush Tiger FabiusInitial Airborne Assault British SectorTongaDeadstick Merville BatteryMallardAmerican SectorAlbany Boston Chicago Detroit Elmira Normandy
Normandy
l
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6th Airborne Division (United Kingdom)
The 6th Airborne Division was an airborne infantry division of the British Army
British Army
during the Second World War. Despite its name, the 6th was actually the second of two airborne divisions raised by the British Army
British Army
during the war, the other being the 1st Airborne Division.[3] The 6th Airborne Division was formed in World War II, in mid-1943, and was commanded by Major-General Richard N. Gale. The division consisted of the 3rd and 5th Parachute Brigades along with the 6th Airlanding Brigade and supporting units. The division's first mission was Operation Tonga
Operation Tonga
on 6 June 1944, D-Day, part of the Normandy landings, where it was responsible for securing the left flank of the Allied invasion during Operation Overlord. The division remained in Normandy for three months before being withdrawn in September
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German Instrument Of Surrender, 1945
The German Instrument of Surrender
German Instrument of Surrender
ended World War II in Europe. The definitive text was signed in Karlshorst, Berlin, on the night of 8 May 1945 by representatives of the three armed services of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht
Oberkommando der Wehrmacht
(OKW) and the Allied Expeditionary Force together with the Supreme High Command of the Red Army, with further French and US representatives signing as witnesses. The signing took place 9 May 1945 at 00:16 local time. An earlier version of the text had been signed in a ceremony in Reims in the early hours of 7 May 1945. In the West, 8 May is known as Victory in Europe Day, whereas in post-Soviet states the Victory Day is celebrated on 9 May. There were three language versions of the surrender document
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John Keegan
Sir John Desmond Patrick Keegan OBE FRSL (15 May 1934 – 2 August 2012) was an English military historian, lecturer, writer and journalist. He was the author of many published works on the nature of combat between the 14th and 21st centuries concerning land, air, maritime, and intelligence warfare, as well as the psychology of battle.Contents1 Life and career 2 Opinions on contemporary conflicts 3 Criticism 4 Honours 5 Published work 6 Works 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksLife and career[edit] At the age of 13 Keegan contracted orthopaedic tuberculosis, which subsequently affected his gait
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Elizabeth II Of The United Kingdom
Elizabeth II
Elizabeth II
(Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926)[a] is Queen of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the other Commonwealth realms. Elizabeth was born in London as the first child of the Duke and Duchess of York, later King George VI
George VI
and Queen Elizabeth, and she was educated privately at home. Her father acceded to the throne on the abdication of his brother King Edward VIII
King Edward VIII
in 1936, from which time she was the heir presumptive. She began to undertake public duties during the Second World War, serving in the Auxiliary Territorial Service
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Territory Of Papua
The Territory of Papua
Territory of Papua
comprised the southeastern quarter of the island of New Guinea
New Guinea
from 1883 to 1975. In 1883, the Government of Queensland
Queensland
annexed this territory for the British Empire.[2] The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
Government refused to ratify the annexation but in 1884 a Protectorate was proclaimed over the territory, then called "British New Guinea". There is a certain ambiguity about the exact date on which the entire territory was annexed by the British
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New Zealand
New Zealand
New Zealand
(/njuːˈziːlənd/ ( listen); Māori: Aotearoa [aɔˈtɛaɾɔa]) is an island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island
North Island
(Te Ika-a-Māui), and the South Island
South Island
(Te Waipounamu)—and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand
New Zealand
is situated some 1,500 kilometres (900 mi) east of Australia
Australia
across the Tasman Sea
Tasman Sea
and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand
New Zealand
developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal and plant life
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