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Chester W. Nimitz
USS Decatur (DD-5) First Submarine
Submarine
Flotilla USS Plunger (SS-2) USS Snapper (SS-16) USS Narwhal (SS-17) 3rd Submarine
Submarine
Division Atlantic Torpedo Fleet USS Skipjack (SS-24) Atlantic
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Charles Henry Nimitz
Charles Henry Nimitz (born Karl Heinrich Nimitz; November 9, 1826 – April 28, 1911) was born in Bremen, Germany, the son of a merchant seaman. He also went to sea before the Nimitz family immigrated to South Carolina in the early 1840s, and later became part of the Adelsverein colonization experiment in the newly annexed state of Texas. He was the grandfather of, and role model for, Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz. In 1852, he built the Nimitz Hotel in Fredericksburg, Texas in the United States. The hotel he built now houses the National Museum of the Pacific War
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Submarine
A submarine (or simply sub) is a watercraft capable of independent operation underwater. It differs from a submersible, which has more limited underwater capability. The term most commonly refers to a large, crewed vessel. It is also sometimes used historically or colloquially to refer to remotely operated vehicles and robots, as well as medium-sized or smaller vessels, such as the midget submarine and the wet sub. The noun submarine evolved as a shortened form of submarine boat;[1] by naval tradition, submarines are usually referred to as "boats" rather than as "ships", regardless of their size (boat is usually reserved for seagoing vessels of relatively small size). Although experimental submarines had been built before, submarine design took off during the 19th century, and they were adopted by several navies. Submarines were first widely used during World War I (1914–1918), and now figure in many navies large and small
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Fredericksburg, Texas
Fredericksburg (German: Friedrichsburg) is the seat of Gillespie County, in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Texas.[3] As of the 2010 Census, the city had a population of 10,530.[4] Fredericksburg was founded in 1846 and named after Prince Frederick of Prussia. Old-time German residents often referred to Fredericksburg as Fritztown, a nickname that is still used in some businesses.[5] The town is also notable as the home of Texas
Texas
German, a dialect spoken by the first generations of German settlers who initially refused to learn English. Fredericksburg shares many cultural characteristics with New Braunfels, which had been established by Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels the previous year. Fredericksburg is the birthplace of Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz
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Battle Of The Philippine Sea
The Battle of the Philippine Sea
Philippine Sea
(June 19–20, 1944) was a major naval battle of World War II
World War II
that eliminated the Imperial Japanese Navy's ability to conduct large-scale carrier actions. It took place during the United States' amphibious invasion of the Mariana Islands during the Pacific War. The battle was the last of five major "carrier-versus-carrier" engagements between American and Japanese naval forces, and pitted elements of the United States
United States
Navy's Fifth Fleet against ships and aircraft of the Imperial Japanese Navy's Mobile Fleet and nearby island garrisons
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Battle Of Leyte Gulf
Decisive Allied victoryJapanese naval capabilities crippledBelligerents United States  Australia  JapanCommanders and leaders William Halsey (3rd Fleet) Thomas Kinkaid (7th Fleet) Clifton Sprague (Taffy 3 / Task Unit 77.4.3) Jesse Oldendorf (Task Group 77.2) John Collins (Task Force 74) Takeo Kurita (Center Force) Shōji Nishimura † (Southern Force) Kiyohide Shima (Southern Force) Jisaburō Ozawa (Northern Force) Yukio Seki † (Kamikazes)Units involved 3rd FleetTask Force 38 7th FleetTask Force 77 Combined Fleet2nd Fleet 3rd Fleet 5th Fleet Navy Air Service1st Air Fleet 2nd Air FleetStrength~300 ships in total[1] 8 fleet carriers 8 light carriers 18 escort carriers 12 battleships 24 cruisers 166 destroyers and destroyer escorts Many PT boats, submarines, and fleet auxiliaries About 1,500 planes 67+ ships in total 1 fleet carrier 3 light ca
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Knight Grand Cross Of The Order Of The Bath
A knight is a person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a monarch or other political leader for service to the monarch or country, especially in a military capacity. Historically, in Europe, knighthood was conferred upon mounted warriors.[1] During the High Middle Ages, knighthood was considered a class of lower nobility. By the Late Middle Ages, the rank had become associated with the ideals of chivalry, a code of conduct for the perfect courtly Christian warrior. Often, a knight was a vassal who served as a fighter for a lord, with payment in the form of land holdings.[2] The lords trusted the knights, who were skilled in battle on horseback. Knighthood
Knighthood
in the Middle Ages was closely linked with horsemanship (and especially the joust) from its origins in the 12th century until its final flowering as a fashion among the high nobility in the Duchy of Burgundy in the 15th century
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Legion Of Honor
The Legion of Honour, full name, National Order of the Legion of Honour (French: Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur),[2] is the highest French order of merit for military and civil merits, established in 1802 by Napoléon Bonaparte and retained by all the divergent governments and regimes later holding power in France, up to the present. The order's motto is "Honneur et Patrie" ("Honour and Fatherland"), and its seat is the Palais de la Légion d'Honneur
Palais de la Légion d'Honneur
next to the Musée d'Orsay, on the left bank of the
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Armed Forces Of The Philippines Medal Of Valor
The Medal of Valor (Filipino: Medalya ng Kagitingan) is the Armed Forces of the Philippines' highest military honor awarded for a conspicuous deed of personal bravery or self-sacrifice above and beyond the call of duty that distinguishes the recipient from his comrades.[2] It is defined in the Philippine Army
Philippine Army
Awards and Decorations reference material FC 1-0062, itself adapted from the Armed Forces of the Philippines
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Submarine Warfare Insignia
The Submarine
Submarine
Warfare Insignia (usually known as "dolphins" or "fish") are worn by qualified submariners.Contents1 Australia 2 United Kingdom 3 France 4 United States4.1 History4.1.1 Appearance4.2 Basic enlisted submarine qualifications4.2.1 Qualification blocks 4.2.2 Block Reviews and Walkthroughs 4.2.3 The "Qual Board" 4.2.4 Post qualification life4.3 Officer submarine qualifications5 See also 6 References 7 SourcesAustralia[edit] In the Royal Australian Navy
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Bureau Of Navigation (United States Navy)
The U.S. Navy's Bureau of Navigation
Navigation
was established in 1862 as part of the reorganization of the Navy Department. Principal responsibilities were to provide nautical charts and instruments and to oversee several activities involved navigation research, including the Naval Observatory
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Nuclear Propulsion
Nuclear propulsion
Nuclear propulsion
includes a wide variety of propulsion methods that fulfill the promise of the Atomic Age
Atomic Age
by using some form of nuclear reaction as their primary power source. The idea of using nuclear material for propulsion dates back to the beginning of the 20th century. In 1903 it was hypothesised that radioactive material, radium, might be a suitable fuel for engines to propel cars, boats, and planes.[1] H. G. Wells
H. G. Wells
picked up this idea in his 1914 fiction work The World Set Free.[2]Pressurised water reactors are the most common reactors used in ships and submarines
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USS Nautilus (SSN-571)
USS Nautilus (SSN-571) was the world's first operational nuclear-powered submarine. The vessel was the first submarine to complete a submerged transit of the North Pole
North Pole
on 3rd August 1958. Sharing names with Captain Nemo's fictional submarine in Jules Verne's classic 1870 science fiction novel Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, and named after another USS Nautilus (SS-168) that served with distinction in World War II, the new atomic powered Nautilus was authorized in 1951, with laying down for construction in 1952 and launched in January 1954, attended by Mamie Eisenhower, First Lady of the United States, wife of 34th President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and commissioned the following September into the United States Navy
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Diesel Engine
The diesel engine (also known as a compression-ignition or CI engine), named after Rudolf Diesel, is an internal combustion engine in which ignition of the fuel which is injected into the combustion chamber is caused by the elevated temperature of the air in the cylinder due to mechanical compression (adiabatic compression). Diesel engines work by compressing only the air. This increases the air temperature inside the cylinder to such a high degree that atomised diesel fuel that is injected into the combustion chamber ignites spontaneously. This contrasts with spark-ignition engines such as a petrol engine (gasoline engine) or gas engine (using a gaseous fuel as opposed to petrol), which use a spark plug to ignite an air-fuel mixture. In diesel engines, glow plugs (combustion chamber pre-warmers) may be used to aid starting in cold weather, or when the engine uses a lower compression-ratio, or both
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Underway Replenishment
Replenishment at sea (RAS) (North Atlantic
Atlantic
Treaty Organisation/Commonwealth of Nations) or underway replenishment (UNREP) (US Navy) is a method of transferring fuel, munitions, and stores from one ship to another while under way.Contents1 History1.1 Concept 1.2 First trials 1.3 Operational use2 Methods2.1 Alongside connected replenishment 2.2 Astern fueling 2.3 Vertical replenishment3 Gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Concept[edit]Early ship resupplying at sea, such as an attempt with HMS Captain in 1870, was slow and often hazardous.Prior to underway replenishment, coaling stations were the only way to refuel ships far from home. The Royal Navy
Royal Navy
had an unparalleled global logistics network of coaling stations and the world's largest collier fleet. This capability allowed the Navy to project naval power around the world and far from home ports
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