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Cheshire (uk Parliament Constituency)
Cheshire
Cheshire
is a former United Kingdom
United Kingdom
Parliamentiary constituency for the county of Cheshire. It was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England
Parliament of England
then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
from 1801 to 1832. As a county palatine it was unrepresented in the Parliament until the Chester and Cheshire
Cheshire
(Constituencies) Act 1542 (34 & 35 Hen VIII. c. 13)
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County Constituency
In the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK), each of the electoral areas or divisions called constituencies elect one member to a parliament or assembly, with the exception of European Parliament
European Parliament
and Northern Ireland Asse
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Peter Brooke (17th-century MP)
Sir Peter Brooke (c. 1602 – 1685) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1646 and 1656. Brooke was the younger son of Thomas Brooke of Norton by Eleanor Gerard, his third wife.[1] In 1646, he was elected Member of Parliament for Newton in the Long Parliament. In 1656 he was elected MP for Cheshire in the Second Protectorate Parliament.[2] Brooke, then of Mere Hall, Cheshire which he bought in 1652, was knighted on 24 July 1660.[3] He was High Sheriff of Cheshire in 1669.[1] He was appointed High Sheriff of Cheshire for 1669-70. He married three times:firstly, Alice, the daughter and heiress of Richard Hulse of Kenilworth, Warwickshire with whom he had two sons; secondly Frances, the daughter of Nicholas Trot of Quickshot, Hertfordshire and the widow of William Merbury of Merbury; and thirdly Mabell, the daughter of William Farrington of Werden and the widow of Richard Clayton of Crooke
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Sir William Brereton, 1st Baronet
Sir William Brereton, 1st Baronet (13 September 1604 – 7 April 1661) was an English writer and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1628 and 1659. He was a commander in the Parliamentary army in the English Civil War.Contents1 Early life 2 Parliamentary career 3 Military career 4 Later career 5 Family 6 References 7 FootnotesEarly life[edit] Brereton was the son of William Brereton and was baptised at Collegiate Church, Manchester, in 1604. He matriculated at Brasenose College, Oxford on 2 November 1621, aged 18 and was a student of Gray's Inn in 1623. He was then of Handforth Hall, Cheshire.[1] He worked hard to increase the value of his estates. For example, he was interested in field sports and built a duck decoy at Dodleston which became something of a commercial operation
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Sir Thomas Aston, 1st Baronet
Sir Thomas Aston, 1st Baronet (29 September 1600 – 24 March 1645) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1640. He fought for the Royalist cause in the English Civil War.Contents1 Background 2 Civil War 3 Family 4 Notes 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] Aston was born in Shropshire, the eldest son of John Aston of Aston, Cheshire and his wife Maud Needham, daughter of Robert Needham.[1] His uncle was the soldier Arthur Aston.[2] He matriculated at Brasenose College, Oxford on 28 March 1617, aged 16, and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts on 8 July 1619. In 1620, he was called to the bar by Lincoln's Inn.[3] Aston was created a baronet of Aston, in the County of Chester by King Charles I of England on 25 July 1628 .[4] He was appointed High Sheriff of Cheshire in 1635
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Peter Venables (MP)
Peter Venables (22 April 1604 – 13 February 1669 ) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1640 and 1669. He supported the Royalist cause in the English Civil War. Venables was the son of Thomas Venables, baron of Kinderton, and his wife Anne Gargreave, daughter of Sir Cotton Gargreave of Nostoll, Yorkshire. He was High Sheriff of Cheshire in 1634.[1] In November 1640, Venables was elected Member of Parliament for Cheshire in the Long Parliament.[2] He supported the King in the Civil War and was disabled from sitting on 22 January 1644. In 1661, Venables was elected MP for Cheshire in the Cavalier Parliament and held the seat until his death.[3] Venables died at the age of 64. Venables married firstly Mary Wilbraham, daughter of Sir Richard Wilbraham of Woodhey and secondly Frances Cholmondeley sister of Sir Robert Cholmondeley.[1] References[edit]^ a b Venables of Kinderton ^ Willis, Browne (1750)
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George Booth, 1st Baron Delamer
George Booth, 1st Baron Delamer (August 1622 – 8 August 1684), styled Sir
Sir
George Booth, 2nd Bt, from 1652 to 1661, until his elevation to the House of Lords
House of Lords
as an English peer.Contents1 Civil War 2 Interregnum2.1 Uprising3 Restoration 4 Family 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksCivil War[edit] George Booth was the son of Sir
Sir
William Booth of Dunham Massey
Dunham Massey
and Margaret Assheton. Sir
Sir
William Booth was the son and heir apparent to Sir
Sir
George Booth, 1st Baronet
Baronet
(1566–1652), of the ancient family settled at Dunham Massey
Dunham Massey
in Cheshire, by his wife Vere Egerton, daughter and co-heir of Sir
Sir
Thomas Egerton
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Robert Duckenfield
Lieutenant Colonel Robert Duckenfield (1619–1689) was a Parliamentarian commander during the English Civil War.[1]Contents1 Family history 2 Civil War 3 Booth's rebellion 4 ReferencesFamily history[edit] Robert Duckenfield came from Dukinfield in Cheshire and was born to Robert and Frances Duckenfield in 1619. The Duckenfields were a noted local family and their history in Cheshire can be traced back to the 13th century.[2] On 28 August 1619 he was baptised in Stockport. Robert Duckenfield married Martha, the daughter of Sir Miles Fleetwood of Hesketh in Lancashire. Their son, also called Robert, born c. 1642, was raised to a baronet. Civil War[edit] During the Civil War, Duckenfield was appointed High Sheriff of Cheshire for six months in 1649.[3] He also played a more active role in the Civil War as he defended Stockport Bridge against Prince Rupert and conducted the siege of Wythenshawe. In 1650, he was made the Governor of Chester
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First Protectorate Parliament
The First Protectorate Parliament
First Protectorate Parliament
was summoned by the Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell
Oliver Cromwell
under the terms of the Instrument of Government. It sat for one term from 3 September 1654 until 22 January 1655 with William Lenthall
William Lenthall
as the Speaker of the House. During the first nine months of The Protectorate
The Protectorate
Cromwell, with the aid of the Council of State, had drawn up a list of 84 bills to present to Parliament for ratification. But the members of Parliament had their own and their constituents' interests to promote and in the end not enough of them would agree to work with Cromwell, or to sign a declaration of their acceptance of the Instrument of Government, to make the constitutional arrangements in the Instrument of Government work
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John Bradshaw (judge)
John Bradshaw (15 July 1602 – 31 October 1659) was an English judge. He is most notable for his role as President of the High Court of Justice for the trial of King Charles I and as the first Lord President of the Council of State of the English Commonwealth.Contents1 Early life 2 Trial of the King 3 Commonwealth and Protectorate 4 Posthumous execution 5 Jamaica connection 6 Legacy 7 Bradshaw in popular culture 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksEarly life[edit] John Bradshaw (sometimes spelt Bradshawe) the second son of Henry Bradshaw and Catherine Winnington was born in 1602 probably at Wybersley (Wyberslegh) Hall in the village of High Lane near Stockport, Cheshire, or possibly at the nearby Peace Farm, Marple (his father farmed at both) and baptised on 10 December in Stockport Church
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John Crew
John Crewe or Crew (1603 – 12 May 1670) was an English barrister and politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1654. Crewe was the second son of Sir Ranulph Crewe, Lord Chief Justice of England, and his first wife Julia Clipsby. He matriculated from St John's College, Cambridge at Easter 1619 and was admitted at Lincoln's Inn on 28 October 1618. He became a barrister in 1626.[1] In 1654, Crewe was elected Member of Parliament for Cheshire in the First Protectorate Parliament.[2] Crewe obtained the manor of Utkinton through his marriage. He died at the age of 67 and was buried at Tarporley where there is a monument to him.[3] In 1636, Crewe married Mary Done (1604-90), daughter of Sir John Done. The youngest of their four children was Sir John Crewe.[3][4] Crewe's brother Clipsby was also an MP. References[edit]^ "Crew, Clippesby (CRW619J)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.  ^ Willis, Browne (1750)
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Richard Legh
Richard Legh (7 May 1634 – 31 August 1687) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1656 and 1678. Legh was the son of Rev. Thomas Legh, DD of Cheshire and rector of Sefton and Walton, Lancashire. He inherited the Lyme Park estate in Cheshire from his uncle Francis Legh in 1643. He was educated at Winwick, Lancashire and admitted at St John's College, Cambridge on 18 June 1649. He was admitted at Gray's Inn on 23 May 1653.[1] In 1656, Legh was elected Member of Parliament for Cheshire in the Second Protectorate Parliament and was re-elected in 1659 for the Third Protectorate Parliament.[2] In 1660, Legh was elected MP for Newton in the Convention Parliament and was re-elected in 1661 for the Cavalier Parliament
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Thomas Marbury
Thomas Marbury was the High Sheriff of Cheshire, serving in that position from 9 December 1620 to 16 November 1621. He was MP for Cheshire for the Second Protectorate Parliament.[1] Marbury was heir to the manor of Marbury, Cheshire. Siding with the Parliamentarians, he raised troops for the Battle of Nantwich of 1644.[2] It was widely suspected that Marbury was not a military man himself.[3] Thomas Marbury was among several Cheshire Parliamentarians to be pardoned by Charles II in 1651.[4] He served in the Second Protectorate Parliament from 17 September 1656, to 26 June 1657.[1]Parliament of EnglandPreceded by John Bradshaw Sir George Booth, Bt Henry Brooke John Crew Member of Parliament for Cheshire 1656 With: Richard Legh Peter Brooke Sir George Booth, Bt Succeeded by John Bradshaw Richard LeghReferences[edit]^ a b Willis, Browne (1750)
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Third Protectorate Parliament
The Third Protectorate Parliament
Third Protectorate Parliament
sat for one session, from 27 January 1659 until 22 April 1659, with Chaloner Chute
Chaloner Chute
and Thomas Bampfylde
Thomas Bampfylde
as the Speakers of the House of Commons. It was a bicameral Parliament, with an Upper House having a power of veto over the Commons.Contents1 Events 2 Composition2.1 Constituencies3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesEvents[edit] After the death of Oliver Cromwell
Oliver Cromwell
his son Richard Cromwell
Richard Cromwell
succeeded him as Lord Protector
Lord Protector
of the Protectorate on 3 September 1658. As a civilian, Richard did not have the full confidence of the Army, particularly as the administration had a perennial budget deficit of half a million pounds and the Army was owed nearly nine hundred thousand pounds in back pay
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Anthony St John
Sir Anthony St John was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1624 and 1625. He supported the Parliamentary side in the English Civil War. St John was a son of Oliver St John, 3rd Baron St John of Bletso and his wife Dorothy Reid, daughter of Sir John Rede or Reid, of Odington, Gloucestershire.[1] He was admitted fellow commoner at Queens' College, Cambridge on 9 November 1601.[2] He was knighted on 5 August 1608 at Bletsoe together with his brother Alexander.[3] In 1624 St John was elected Member of Parliament for Wigan. In 1625 he was elected MP for Cheshire.[4] St John was a captain in the Earl of Essex Regiment of Foot in 1642[5] and continued to support the parliamentary side in the Civil War.[6] St John lived at the ancient home of the St John family at Fonmon Castle. The house was sold in 1656 to Colonel Philip Jones.[7] St John married Lady Katherine Herbert, 24 April 1610 St. Andrew Holborn, London, England;[8] widow of Sir W. Herbert and a daughter of Dr
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Sir Thomas Mainwaring, 1st Baronet
Sir Thomas Mainwaring, 1st Baronet (7 April 1623 – 28 June 1689) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1660. Mainwaring was the son of Philip Mainwaring of Peover Hall, Over Peover and his wife Ellen Minshull, daughter of Edward Minshull of Stoke.[1] In 1654 his mother had the Peover Hall Stable Block built for him.[2] He was High Sheriff of Cheshire in 1657.[1] In 1660, Mainwaring was elected Member of Parliament for Cheshire in the Convention Parliament.[3] He was created baronet on 22 November 1660 by Charles II on his restoration.[1] Mainwaring died at the age of 66 and laid to rest in Over Peover. He had married Mary Delves, daughter of Sir Henry Delves, 2nd Baronet, of Dodington and had 6 sons and 6 daughters
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