HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

Chen Ning Yang
Yang Chen-Ning or Chen-Ning Yang (born October 1,[1] 1922) is a Chinese theoretical physicist who made significant contributions to statistical mechanics, integrable systems, gauge theory, and both particle physics and condensed matter physics. He and Tsung-Dao Lee received the 1957 Nobel Prize in Physics[2] for their work on parity nonconservation of weak interaction. The two proposed that one of the basic quantum-mechanics laws, the conservation of parity, is violated in the so-called weak nuclear reactions, those nuclear processes that result in the emission of beta or alpha particles. Yang is also well known for his collaboration with Robert Mills in developing non-Abelian gauge theory, widely known as the Yang–Mills theory. In his physics papers, he is commonly referred to as Chen-Ning Yang or C. N. Yang. His Chinese name is spelled Yang Chen-Ning or Yang Zhenning (Chinese: 楊振寧)
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Chinese Name
Chinese personal names are names used by those from mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan and other parts of the Chinese-speaking world such as Singapore. Due to China's historical dominance of East Asian culture, many names used in Korea and Vietnam are adaptations of Chinese names or have historical roots in Chinese, with appropriate adaptation to accommodate linguistic differences. Modern Chinese names consist of a surname known as xìng (), which comes first and is usually but not always monosyllabic, followed by a given name called míng (), which is nearly always mono- or disyllabic. Prior to the 20th century, educated Chinese men also utilized a "courtesy name" or "style name" called () by which they were known among those outside their family and closest friends
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Benjamin Franklin Medal For Distinguished Achievement In The Sciences
The Benjamin Franklin Medal presented by the American Philosophical Society located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., also called Benjamin Franklin Bicentennial Medal, is awarded since 1906. The originally called "Philosophical Society" was founded in 1743 by Benjamin Franklin. The award was created to remember the 200th anniversary of the birthday of Franklin.[1][2][3] The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston has this medal in his collection.[4] The medal was created by the brothers Augustus and Louis St
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Statistical Mechanics

Statistical mechanics, one of the pillars of modern physics, describes how macroscopic observations (such as temperature and pressure) are related to microscopic parameters that fluctuate around an average. It connects thermodynamic quantities (such as heat capacity) to microscopic behavior, whereas, in classical thermodynamics, the only available option would be to measure and tabulate such quantities for various materials.[1] Statistical mechanics is necessary for the fundamental study of any physical system that hStatistical mechanics, one of the pillars of modern physics, describes how macroscopic observations (such as temperature and pressure) are related to microscopic parameters that fluctuate around an average
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Particle Physics

Particle physics (also known as high energy physics) is a branch of physics that studies the nature of the particles that constitute matter and radiation. Although the word particle can refer to various types of very small objects (e.g. protons, gas particles, or even household dust), particle physics usually investigates the irreducibly smallest detectable particles and the fundamental interactions necessary to explain their behaviour. By our current understanding, these elementary particles are excitations of the quantum fields that also govern their interactions. The currently dominant theory explaining these fundamental particles and fields, along with their dynamics, is called the Standard Model. Thus, modern particle physics generally investigates the Standard Model and its various possible extensions, e.g
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Condensed Matter Physics
Condensed matter physics is the field of physics that deals with the macroscopic and microscopic physical properties of matter, especially the solid and liquid phases which arise from electromagnetic forces between atoms. More generally, the subject deals with "condensed" phases of matter, systems of very many constituents with strong interactions between them. More exotic condensed phases include the superconducting phase exhibited by certain materials at low temperature, the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases of spins on crystal lattices of atoms, and the Bose–Einstein condensate found in ultracold atomic systems
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Stony Brook University

The State University of New York at Stony Brook (SUNY at Stony Brook), more commonly known as Stony Brook University (SBU), is a public research university in Stony Brook, New York. It is one of four university centers of the State University of New York system. Consisting of 213 buildings over 1,454 acres of land in Suffolk County, it is the largest public university in the state of New York by area.[6] The institution was founded 63 years ago in 1957 in Oyster Bay as State University College on Long Island, and moved to Stony Brook in 1962.[7] In 2001, Stony Brook was elected to the Association of American Universities, a selective group of major research universities in North America
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Institute For Advanced Study
The Institute for Advanced Study (IAS), located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States, is an independent postdoctoral research center for theoretical research and intellectual inquiry. It has served academic home of internationally preeminent scholars, including Albert Einstein, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Hermann Weyl, John von Neumann, and Kurt Gödel, after they immigrated to the United States. It was founded in 1930 by American educator Abraham Flexner, together with philanthropists Louis Bamberger and Caroline Bamberger Fuld
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Doctoral Advisor
A doctoral advisor (also dissertation director or dissertation advisor) is a member of a university faculty whose role is to guide graduate students who are candidates for a doctorate, helping them select coursework, as well as shaping, refining and directing the students' choice of sub-discipline in which they will be examined or on which they will write a dissertation.[1] Students generally choose advisors based on their areas of interest within their discipline, their desire to work closely with particular graduate faculty, and the willingness and availability of those faculty to work with them. In some countries, the student's advisor serves as the chair of the dissertation committee or the examination committee. In some cases, though, the person who serves those roles may be different from the faculty member who has most closely advised the student
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



T. Bill Sutherland
T. Bill Sutherland (born March 31, 1942) is an American theoretical physicist, Emeritus Professor of Physics at the University of Utah. He received his BA from Washington University in St. Louis and his PhD in 1968 while studying under Nobel laureate C. N. Yang at Stony Brook.[1] He is best known for his work in statistical mechanics and quantum many body theory. Early in his career he solved the six vertex model and developed an exact solution in 1967, which he then followed with the eight vertex model in 1970. He completed his postdoctoral work at Berkeley in the 1969-1971 time frame where he became interested in inverse square potential many body interactions. He then became a professor of physics at the University of Utah in 1971 where he worked until his retirement in 2004
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Simplified Chinese Characters
Simplified Chinese characters (简化字; jiǎnhuàzì)[1] are standardized Chinese characters used in mainland China, as prescribed by Table of General Standard Chinese Characters. Along with traditional Chinese characters, they are one of the two standard character sets of the contemporary Chinese written language. The government of the People's Republic of China in mainland China has promoted them for use in printing since the 1950s and 1960s to encourage literacy.[2] They are officially used in the People's Republic of China and Singapore, while traditional Chinese characters are used in Hong Kong, Macau, the Republic of China (Taiwan) and occasionally in the Chinese community of Malaysia and Singapore. Simplified Chinese characters may be referred to by their official name above or colloquially (简体字; jiǎntǐzì)
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Traditional Chinese Characters

Traditional Chinese characters (traditional Chinese: /; simplified Chinese: /, Pinyin: Zhèngtǐzì/Fántǐzì)[1] are Chinese characters in any character set which does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946.[dubious ] Traditional Chinese characters are used in Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau, as well as in most overseas Chinese communities outside Southeast Asia
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Standard Chinese

Standard Chinese, in linguistics known as Standard Northern Mandarin[8][9][10], Standard Beijing Mandarin[11][12] or simply Mandarin[13], is a dialect of Mandarin that emerged as the lingua franca among the speakers of various Mandarin and other varieties of Chinese (Hokkien, Cantonese and beyond). Standard Mandarin is designated as one of the major languages in the United Nations, mainland China, Singapore and Taiwan. Like other Sinitic languages, Standard Mandarin is a tonal language with topic-prominent organization and subject–verb–object word order. It has more initial consonants but fewer vowels, final consonants and tones than southern varieties
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]