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Chemical Heritage Foundation
The Science History Institute
Science History Institute
is an institution that preserves and promotes understanding of the history of science. Located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, it includes a library, museum, archive, research center and conference center. It was founded in 1982 as a joint venture of the American Chemical Society and the University of Pennsylvania, as the Center for the History of Chemistry (CHOC). The American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) became a co-founder in 1984
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Chestnut Street (Philadelphia)
Chestnut Street is a major historic street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was originally named Wynne Street because Thomas Wynne's home was there. William Penn renamed it Chestnut Street in 1684. It runs east–west from the Delaware River waterfront in downtown Philadelphia through Center City and West Philadelphia. The road crosses the Schuylkill River on the Chestnut Street Bridge
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Glenn T. Seaborg
Glenn Theodore Seaborg (/ˈsiːbɔːrɡ/; April 19, 1912 – February 25, 1999) was an American chemist whose involvement in the synthesis, discovery and investigation of ten transuranium elements earned him a share of the 1951 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.[3] His work in this area also led to his development of the actinide concept and the arrangement of the actinide series in the periodic table of the elements. Seaborg spent most of his career as an educator and research scientist at the University of California, Berkeley, serving as a professor, and, between 1958 and 1961, as the university's second chancellor.[4] He advised ten US Presidents – from Harry S. Truman
Harry S. Truman
to Bill Clinton – on nuclear policy and was Chairman
Chairman
of the United States Atomic Energy Commission from 1961 to 1971, where he pushed for commercial nuclear energy and the peaceful applications of nuclear science
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Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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Margaret W. Rossiter
Margaret W. Rossiter (born July 1944) is an American historian of science, and Marie Underhill Noll Professor of the History of Science, at Cornell University.[1] Rossiter coined the term Matilda effect
Matilda effect
for the systematic repression and denial of the contribution of women scientists in research, whose work is often attributed to their male colleagues.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career and academic contributions 3 Awards 4 Works 5 See also 6 ReferencesEarly life and education[edit] Margaret Rossiter and her twin brother Charles were born into a military family at the end of the Second World War.[2] The family eventually settled in Massachusetts
Massachusetts
near Boston, first in Malden and then Melrose
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Alfred D. Chandler, Jr.
Alfred
Alfred
may refer to:Contents1 Arts and entertainment 2 Business and organisations 3 People 4 Places 5 Ships 6 Other uses 7 See alsoArts and entertainment[edit] For fictional characters called Alfred, see Alfred
Alfred
(name) § Fictional characters. Alfred
Alfred
J
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Nobel Prize
The Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
(/ˈnoʊbɛl/, Swedish pronunciation: [nʊˈbɛl]; Swedish definite form, singular: Nobelpriset; Norwegian: Nobelprisen) is a set of annual international awards bestowed in several categories by Swedish and Norwegian institutions in recognition of academic, cultural, or scientific advances. The will of the Swedish scientist Alfred Nobel
Alfred Nobel
established the prizes in 1895
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Christian B. Anfinsen
Christian Boehmer Anfinsen Jr. (March 26, 1916 – May 14, 1995)[1] was an American biochemist. He shared the 1972 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Stanford Moore and William Howard Stein for work on ribonuclease, especially concerning the connection between the amino acid sequence and the biologically active conformation (see Anfinsen's dogma).[2]Contents1 Background 2 Career 3 Christian B. Anfinsen
Christian B. Anfinsen
Award 4 Selected works 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] Anfinsen was born in Monessen, Pennsylvania, into a family of Norwegian American
Norwegian American
immigrants. His parents were Sophie (née Rasmussen) and Christian Boehmer Anfinsen Sr., a mechanical engineer.[3] The family moved to Philadelphia in the 1920s. He earned a bachelor's degree from Swarthmore College
Swarthmore College
in 1937
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Herbert C. Brown
Herbert Charles Brown (May 22, 1912 – December 19, 2004) was an English-born American chemist and recipient of the 1979 Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Chemistry
for his work with organoboranes.Contents1 Life and career 2 Research 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Brown was born Herbert Brovarnik in London, to Ukrainian Jewish immigrants from Zhitomir, Pearl (née Gorinstein) and Charles Brovarnik, a hardware store manager and carpenter.[2] He moved to Chicago
Chicago
in June 1914, at the age of two.[3][4] Brown attended Crane Junior College in Chicago, where he met Sarah Baylen, whom he would later marry. The college closed soon after, and Brown and Baylen transferred to Wright Junior College.[4] In 1935 he left Wright Junior College and that autumn entered the University of Chicago, completed two years of studies in three quarters, and earned a B.S
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American Society For Biochemistry And Molecular Biology
The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) is a learned society that was founded on December 26, 1906 at a meeting organized by John Jacob Abel (Johns Hopkins University).[1] The roots of the society were in the American Physiological Society, which had been formed some 20 years earlier. The ASBMB was originally called the American Society of Biological Chemists, before obtaining its current name in 1987. The society is based in Rockville, Maryland. ASBMB's mission is to advance the science of biochemistry and molecular biology through publication of scientific and educational journals, the organization of scientific meetings, advocacy for funding of basic research and education, support of science education at all levels, and by promoting the diversity of individuals entering the scientific workforce
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United States Bicentennial
The United States Bicentennial
United States Bicentennial
was a series of celebrations and observances during the mid-1970s that paid tribute to historical events leading up to the creation of the United States of America as an independent republic. It was a central event in the memory of the American Revolution
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American Association Of Textile Chemists And Colorists
AATCC—the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists—is a 501(c)(6) not-for-profit professional association that provides test method development, quality control materials, educational development, and networking for textile and apparel professionals throughout the world.Contents1 Activities 2 Organization 3 History 4 Membership 5 References 6 External linksActivities[edit] AATCC has developed more than 200 textile-related standards, including test methods, evaluation procedures, and monographs. These standards are published each year in the AATCC Technical Manual.[1] All standards are developed and updated by volunteer members, through research committees. All industry stakeholders may participate in the standards-development process. Before a standard is published in the AATCC Technical Manual, it must be unanimously approved by voting members of the responsible research committee and the Technical Committee on Research (TCR)
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Electrochemical Society
The Electrochemical Society
Electrochemical Society
is a learned society (professional association) based in the United States that supports scientific inquiry in the field of electrochemistry and solid-state science and technology. The society membership comprises more than 8,000 scientists and engineers in over 70 countries worldwide who hold individual membership, as well as roughly 100 corporations and laboratories that hold corporate membership.[citation needed]Contents1 History 2 Meetings 3 Publications3.1 Journals 3.2 Interface 3.3 ECS Meetings Abstracts 3.4 ECS Transactions4 Open access 5 Awards 6 Notable members 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] In November 1901, Charles John Reed set out on a mission to create a new society in order to more quickly and efficiently exchange information and ideas among those interested in electrochemistry. With the help of friend and professor Joseph W
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American Society For Mass Spectrometry
The American Society for Mass Spectrometry (ASMS) is a professional association based in the United States that supports the scientific field of mass spectrometry. As of 2018, the society had approximately 8,500 members primarily from the US, but also from around the world.[1][2] The society holds a large annual meeting, typically in late May or early June as well as other topical conferences and workshops. The society publishes the Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry.Contents1 Awards 2 Publications 3 Conferences3.1 Annual Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics4 See also 5 References 6 External linksAwards[edit] The Society recognizes achievements and promotes academic research through four annual awards
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Smithsonian Institution
The Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Institution
(/smɪθˈsoʊniən/ smith-SOH-nee-ən), established on August 10, 1846 "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge," is a group of museums and research centers administered by the Government of the United States.[1] The institution is named after its founding donor, British scientist James Smithson.[2] Originally organized as the "United States National Museum," that name ceased to exist as an administrative entity in 1967.[3] Termed "the nation's attic"[4] for its eclectic holdings of 154 million items,[2] the Institution's nineteen museums, nine research centers, and zoo include historical and architectural landmarks, mostly located in the District of Columbia.[5] Additional facilities are located in Arizona, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York City, Pittsburgh, Texas, Virginia, and Panama
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Society For Applied Spectroscopy
The Society for Applied Spectroscopy (SAS) is an organization promoting research and education in the fields of spectroscopy, optics, and analytical chemistry. Founded in 1958, it is currently headquartered in Frederick, MD
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