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Cheltenham
Cheltenham
Cheltenham
/ˈtʃɛltnəm/, also known as Cheltenham
Cheltenham
Spa, is a regency spa town and borough which is located on the edge of the Cotswolds, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
in Gloucestershire, England. With a motto of Salubritas et Eruditio meaning 'health and education', Cheltenham
Cheltenham
has been a health and holiday spa town resort since the discovery of mineral springs in 1716 and has a high number of internationally renowned and historic schools. The town hosts several festivals of culture, often featuring nationally and internationally famous contributors and attendees
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Urban District (Great Britain And Ireland)
A district is a type of administrative division that, in some countries, is managed by local government
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Telephone Numbering Plan
A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints.[1] Telephone numbers are the addresses of participants in a telephone network, reachable by a system of destination code routing. Telephone numbering plans are defined in each of administrative regions of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and they are also present in private telephone networks. For public number systems, geographic location plays a role in the sequence of numbers assigned to each telephone subscriber. Numbering plans may follow a variety of design strategies which have often arisen from the historical evolution of individual telephone networks and local requirements. A broad division is commonly recognized, distinguishing open numbering plans and closed numbering plans[discuss]
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Lewis Carroll
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (/ˈlʌtwɪdʒ ˈdɒdsən/;[1][2][3] 27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll (/ˈkærəl/), was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican
Anglican
deacon, and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, which includes the poem "Jabberwocky", and the poem The Hunting of the Snark – all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic and fantasy
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Alice Liddell
Alice Pleasance Hargreaves (née Liddell (/ˈlɪdəl/[1]); 4 May 1852 – 16 November 1934) was, in her childhood, an acquaintance and photography subject of Lewis Carroll
Lewis Carroll
(Charles Lutwidge Dodgson). One of the stories he told her during a boating trip became the children's classic Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Although she shared her name with the heroine of the story, scholars disagree about the extent to which the character was based upon her
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Second World War
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Mineral Spring
Mineral
Mineral
springs are naturally occurring springs that produce water containing minerals, or other dissolved substances, that alter its taste or give it a purported therapeutic value. Salts, sulfur compounds, and gases are among the substances that can be dissolved in the spring water during its passage underground. Mineral
Mineral
water obtained from mineral springs has long been an important commercial proposition. Mineral
Mineral
spas are resorts that have developed around mineral springs, where (often wealthy) patrons would repair to “take the waters” — meaning that they would drink (see hydrotherapy and water cure) or bathe in (see balneotherapy) the mineral water. Historical mineral springs were often outfitted with elaborate stone-works — including artificial pools, retaining walls, colonnades and roofs — sometimes in the form of fanciful "Greek temples", gazebos or pagodas
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Domesday Book
Domesday Book
Domesday Book
(/ˈduːmzdeɪ/ or US: /ˈdoʊmzdeɪ/;[1][2] Latin: Liber de Wintonia "Book of Winchester") is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:[3]Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester
Gloucester
with his council ... . After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men
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River Severn
The River Severn
River Severn
(Welsh: Afon Hafren, Latin: Sabrina) is a river in the United Kingdom. At about 220 miles (354 km), it is usually considered to be the longest in the UK.[4][5] It rises at an altitude of 2,001 feet (610 m) on Plynlimon, close to the Ceredigion/Powys border near Llanidloes, in the Cambrian Mountains
Cambrian Mountains
of mid Wales. It then flows through Shropshire, Worcestershire
Worcestershire
and Gloucestershire, with the county towns of Shrewsbury, Worcester
Worcester
and Gloucester
Gloucester
on its banks
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Normandy Landings
Omaha Beach:V Corps1st Infantry Division 29th Infantry DivisionUtah Beach:VII Corps4th Infantry Division 82nd Airborne Division 90th Infantry Division 101st Airborne Division Second ArmyGold BeachXXX Corps50th Infantry DivisionJuno BeachI Corps3rd Canadian Infantry DivisionSword BeachI Corps3rd Infantry Division 6th Airborne Division 5th Panzer ArmySouth of Caen21st Panzer Division 7th ArmyOmaha352nd Infantry DivisionUtah Beach709th Static DivisionGold, Juno, and Sword716th Static DivisionStrength156,000[a] 50,350+[10] 170 coastal artillery guns
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List Of Towns In The United Kingdom
In England, Wales
Wales
and Northern Ireland, a town traditionally was a settlement which had a charter to hold a market or fair and therefore became a "market town". In Scotland, the equivalent is known as a burgh (pronounced [ˈbʌɾə]). There are two types of burgh: royal burghs and burghs of barony. The Local Government Act 1972
Local Government Act 1972
allows civil parishes in England
England
and Wales
Wales
to resolve themselves to be Town Councils, under section (245 subsection 6), which also gives the chairman of such parishes the title 'town mayor'
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Local Government Act 1972
The Local Government Act 1972
Local Government Act 1972
(c 70) is an Act of Parliament
Act of Parliament
in the
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Through The Looking-Glass
Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There (1872[1]) is a novel by Lewis Carroll
Lewis Carroll
(Charles Lutwidge Dodgson), the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
(1865). Set some six months later than the earlier book, Alice again enters a fantastical world, this time by climbing through a mirror into the world that she can see beyond it. Through the Looking-Glass
Through the Looking-Glass
includes such celebrated verses as "Jabberwocky" and "The Walrus and the Carpenter", and the episode involving Tweedledum and Tweedledee
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Spa Town
A spa town is a resort town based on a mineral spa (a developed mineral spring). Patrons visit spas to "take the waters" for their purported health benefits. The word spa is derived from the name of Spa, a town in Belgium. Thomas Guidott set up a medical practice in the English town of Bath in 1668. He became interested in the curative properties of the hot mineral waters there and in 1676 wrote A discourse of Bathe, and the hot waters there
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British National Grid Reference System
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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Area Of Outstanding Natural Beauty
An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
(AONB) is an area of countryside in England, Wales
Wales
or Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
which has been designated for conservation due to its significant landscape value. Areas are designated in recognition of their national importance, by the relevant public body: Natural England, Natural Resources Wales, or the Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
Environment Agency. In place of AONB, Scotland uses the similar national scenic area designation. Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty enjoy levels of protection from development similar to those of UK national parks, but unlike with national parks the responsible bodies do not have their own planning powers
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