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Cheat (game)
Cheat (also known as B.S., bluff, and I-doubt-it[1]) is a card game where the players aim to get rid of all of their cards.[2][3] It is a game of deception, with cards being played face-down and players being permitted to lie about the cards they have played. A challenge is usually made by players calling out the name of the game, and the loser of a challenge has to pick up every card played so far. Cheat is classed as a party game.[2] As with many card games, cheat has an oral tradition and so people are taught the game under different names
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Albert Morehead
Albert Hodges Morehead, Jr. (August 7, 1909 – October 5, 1966) was a writer for The New York Times, a bridge player, a lexicographer, and an author and editor of reference works.[1][2][3][clarification needed]Contents1 Early years 2 Journalism 3 Bridge 4 Death 5 Bridge accomplishments5.1 Honors 5.2 Awards 5.3 Wins 5.4 Runners-up6 References 7 External linksEarly years[edit] Morehead was born in Flintstone, Taylor County, Georgia[citation needed] on August 7, 1909, to Albert Hodges Morehead
Albert Hodges Morehead
I (1854–1922) and Bianca Noa (1874–1945). Albert senior was a choral conductor.[3] Bianca's brother was Loveman Noa, the Naval hero. Albert's siblings were: Kerenhappuch Turner Morehead (1905–1907) who died as an infant; and James Turner Morehead (1906–1988). His parents lived in Lexington, Kentucky, but were spending their summer in Georgia at the time of his birth
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Screw Your Neighbour
Ranter-Go-Round (also known as Chase the Ace, Cuckoo, Bohemian Poker, Screw Your Neighbor, Stick or Swap, Bring the King, or Chicago Shuffle)[1] is a card game with bluffing elements. It is related to the dedicated deck card or tile game Gnav. Play[edit] Any number of players, 52 cards. The object is to not have the lowest card at the table. The ranking of cards from highest to lowest is: K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 A, or alternately A K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2. Suit is irrelevant.[2] Each player has an equal number of counters placed in front of them - usually from 2 to 4 - to mark his or her "lives". (Alternatively, a dollar bill or other note may be used, and players use the corners to mark their lives, folding a corner in when a life is lost.) Cards are dealt, one card to each, face down. Starting to the left of the dealer - each in turn examines their card. If they are satisfied with their card they may keep it, usually simply by announcing, "I'm good." or similar
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Daifugō
Daifugō
Daifugō
(大富豪, Grand Millionaire) or Daihinmin (大貧民, Extreme Needy) is a Japanese card game for three or more players played with a standard 52-card pack. The objective of the game is to get rid of all the cards one has as fast as possible by playing progressively stronger cards than those of the previous player. The winner is called the daifugō (the grand millionaire) earning various advantages in the next round, and the last person is called the daihinmin (the extreme needy). In that following round, winners can exchange their one or more unnecessary cards for advantageous ones that losers have. The game is very similar to the Chinese climbing card games Big Two and Zheng Shangyou, to the Vietnamese game Tien Len, and to Western card games like President, also known as Capitalism and Asshole, and The Great Dalmuti
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Clockwise
Two-dimensional rotation can occur in two possible directions. A clockwise (typically abbreviated as CW) motion is one that proceeds in the same direction as a clock's hands: from the top to the right, then down and then to the left, and back up to the top
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Bartok (card Game)
The game of Bartok, also known by a number of other names, such as Wartoke, Warthog, Bartog, Bentok, Last One Standing or Bong 98, is a card game where the winner of each round invents a new rule which must be obeyed for the remainder of the game. It belongs to the "shedding" or Crazy Eights
Crazy Eights
family of card games, whereby each player tries to rid himself of all of his cards. The game progresses through a series of rounds with a new rule being added in each round, thus making the game increasingly complex as it progresses. These newly introduced rules may modify any existing rules.Contents1 Gameplay1.1 Creating new rules 1.2 Penalties2 Mao 3 See also 4 External linksGameplay[edit] The game of Bartok consists of several rounds of play. The winner of each round creates a new rule which remains in play for future rounds of the game. The players sit in a circle and the cards are placed face down in the center and mixed
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Oxford University Press
Oxford
Oxford
University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world,[1] and the second oldest after Cambridge University
Cambridge University
Press. It is a department of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
and is governed by a group of 15 academics appointed by the vice-chancellor known as the delegates of the press. They are headed by the secretary to the delegates, who serves as OUP's chief executive and as its major representative on other university bodies
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David Parlett
David Parlett (born 18 May 1939 in London)[1] is a games scholar, historian, and translator from South London, who has studied both card games and board games.[2] His published works include many popular books on games and the more academic volumes The Oxford Guide to Card Games and The Oxford History of Board Games, both now out of print. Parlett also invented a number of board games, the most successful of which is Hare and Tortoise
Hare and Tortoise
(1974)
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Hubert Phillips
Hubert Phillips
Hubert Phillips
(13 December 1891 – 9 January 1964)[1] was a British economist, journalist, broadcaster, bridge player and organiser, composer of puzzles and quizzes, and the author of some 70 books
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The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian
is a British daily newspaper. It was founded in 1821 as The Manchester
Manchester
Guardian, and changed its name in 1959. Along with its sister papers The Observer and The Guardian
The Guardian
Weekly, the Guardian is part of the Guardian Media Group, owned by the Scott Trust. The trust was created in 1936 to "secure the financial and editorial independence of the Guardian in perpetuity and to safeguard the journalistic freedom and liberal values of the Guardian free from commercial or political interference".[4] The trust was converted into a limited company in 2008, with a constitution written so as to maintain for The Guardian
The Guardian
the same protections as were built into the structure of the Scott Trust by its creators
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Fujian
Fujian
Fujian
(Chinese: 福建; pinyin: Fújiàn; pronounced [fǔtɕjɛ̂n] ( listen)), formerly romanised as Foken, Fouken, Fukien, and Hokkien, is a province on the southeast coast of mainland China. Fujian
Fujian
is bordered by three provinces: Zhejiang
Zhejiang
to the north, Jiangxi
Jiangxi
to the west and Guangdong
Guangdong
to the south, along with Taiwan
Taiwan
150 km to the east, across the Taiwan
Taiwan
strait.[6] The name Fujian
Fujian
came from the combination of Fuzhou
Fuzhou
and Jianzhou (a former name for Jian'ou) two cities in Fujian, during the Tang dynasty
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Wild Card (card Games)
Card games, particularly poker games, may contain one or more cards designated as wild. These may be jokers, or they may be normal ranked and suited cards pressed into wild card duty ("deuces wild" is a common variant). In most cases, the wild card or cards must be agreed upon by all players before the cards are dealt and play commences. There are two common rules regarding wild cards: "fully wild" cards and the "bug". A card that is fully wild can be designated by its holder as any card they choose with no restrictions. Under this rule, for example, a hand with any natural pair and a wild card becomes three of a kind. Without wild cards in play, the best possible hand is a natural royal flush. The common rule in casinos is that a wild card plays as a bug, which is given the rank of ace unless designating it as a different card would complete a straight, flush, or royal flush
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Joker (playing Card)
The Joker is a playing card found in most modern card decks, as an addition to the standard four suits (clubs, diamonds, hearts and spades). The Joker originated in the United States during the civil war and was created as a trump card for the game of Euchre. It has since been adopted into many other card games where it may function as a wild card. The card is unique in that it lacks an industry-wide standard appearance.Contents1 Origin 2 Appearance 3 Tarot
Tarot
and cartomancy 4 Use of the Joker in card games4.1 Specific roles5 References 6 External linksOrigin[edit]Imperial Bower, the earliest Joker, by Samuel Hart, c
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America Flag Coat of arms Motto: "In God
God
We Trust"[1] .mw-parser-output .nobold f
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