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Chaste
Chastity
Chastity
is sexual conduct of a person that is deemed praiseworthy and virtuous according to the moral standards and guidelines of their culture, civilization or religion. The term has become closely associated (and is often used interchangeably) with sexual abstinence, especially before marriage and outside marriage.[1][2]Contents1 Etymology 2 In Abrahamic religions2.1 Christianity 2.2 Islam 2.3 Bahá'í Faith3 In Eastern religions3.1 Hinduism 3.2 Sikhism 3.3 Jainism 3.4 Buddhism 3.5 Daoism4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The words "chaste" and "chastity" stem from the Latin
Latin
adjective castus meaning "pure". The words entered the English language around the middle of the 13th century; at that time they meant slightly different things
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Sikhism
Sikhism
Sikhism
(/ˈsiːkɪzəm/; Punjabi: ਸਿੱਖੀ), or Sikhi[3] Sikkhī, pronounced [ˈsɪkːʰiː], from Sikh, meaning a "disciple", or a "learner"), is a religion that originated in the Punjab region
Punjab region

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Bahá'í Teachings
The Bahá'í teachings represent a considerable number of theological, social, and spiritual ideas that were established in the Bahá'í Faith by Bahá'u'lláh, the founder of the religion, and clarified by successive leaders including `Abdu'l-Bahá, Bahá'u'lláh's son, and Shoghi Effendi, `Abdu'l-Bahá's grandson. The teachings were written in various Bahá'í writings
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Monasticism
Monasticism
Monasticism
(from Greek μοναχός, monachos, derived from μόνος, monos, "alone") or monkhood is a religious way of life in which one renounces worldly pursuits to devote oneself fully to spiritual work. Monastic life plays an important role in many Christian
Christian
churches, especially in the Catholic and Orthodox traditions. Similar forms of religious life also exist in other faiths, most notably in Buddhism, but also in Hinduism
Hinduism
and Jainism, although the expressions differ considerably.[1] By contrast, in other religions monasticism is criticized and not practiced, as in Islam
Islam
and Zoroastrianism, or plays a marginal role, as in Judaism. Women pursuing a monastic life are generally called nuns, while monastic men are called monks. Many monks and nuns live in monasteries to stay away from the secular world
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Double Cloister
A double monastery (also double house) is a monastery combining a separate community of monks and one of nuns, joined in one institution.[a] More common in the monasticism of Eastern Christianity, where they are found since the 4th century, in the West the establishment of double monasteries became popular after Columbanus
Columbanus
and were found in Anglo-Saxon England
Anglo-Saxon England
and Gaul.[1] Double monasteries were forbidden by the Second Council of Nicaea
Second Council of Nicaea
in 787, though it took many years for the decree to be enforced.[2] In a significantly different way, double monasteries were revived again after the 12th century,[1] when a number of religious houses were established on this pattern, among Benedictines and possibly the Dominicans
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Second Lateran Council
The Second Council of the Lateran
Second Council of the Lateran
is believed to have been the tenth ecumenical council held by the Roman Catholic Church. It was convened by Pope Innocent II
Pope Innocent II
in April 1139 and attended by close to a thousand clerics. Its immediate task was to neutralise the after-effects of the schism which had arisen after the death of Pope Honorius II
Pope Honorius II
in 1130 and the papal election that year that established Pietro Pierleoni as the antipope Anacletus II.Contents1 Tenth ecumenical council 2 Important canons 3 Notes 4 External linksTenth ecumenical council[edit] After the death of Honorius II, Petrus Leonis, under the name of Anacletus II, was elected as Pope by a majority of the cardinals and with the support of the people of Rome on the same day as a minority elected Innocent II
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Beguines And Beghards
The Beguines /bəˈɡiːnz/ and the Beghards /bəˈɡɑːrdz/ were Christian
Christian
lay religious orders that were active in Northern Europe, particularly in the Low Countries
Low Countries
in the 13th–16th centuries. Their members lived in semi-monastic communities but did not take formal religious vows. That is, although they promised not to marry "as long as they lived as Beguines" to quote one of the early Rules, they were free to leave at any time
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Contemplation
Contemplation
Contemplation
is profound thinking about something
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Bruderhof Communities
The Bruderhof (/ˈbruːdərˌhɔːf/; German: place of brothers) is a Christian
Christian
movement that practices community of goods after the example of the first church described in Acts 2
Acts 2
and Acts 4.[1] They have communities in the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Paraguay, and Australia. The Bruderhof is seen as Anabaptist due to its beliefs and practice.[2] The Bruderhof practices adult baptism, non-violence and peacemaking, full community of goods, the proclamation of the gospel and lifelong faithfulness in marriage.[3] The communities are best known by the name "Bruderhof" or sometimes "Bruderhof Communities", though "Bruderhof" is the name used on their website. The communities are legally incorporated in the US as "Church Communities International"
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Counsels Of Perfection
Portals: Christianity
Christianity
Bible  Book:Life of Jesusv t eThe three evangelical counsels or counsels of perfection in Christianity
Christianity
are chastity, poverty (or perfect charity), and obedience.[1] As Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth stated in the Canonical gospels,[2] they are counsels for those who desire to become "perfect" (τελειος, cf. Matthew 19:21, see also Strong's G5046 and Imitatio dei). The Catholic Church
Catholic Church
interprets this to mean that they are not binding upon all and hence not necessary conditions to attain eternal life (heaven)
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Christian Theological Praxis
Christian theological praxis is a term used by most liberation theologians to express how the Gospel
Gospel
of Jesus Christ
Jesus Christ
is to be lived in the world.Contents1 Description 2 Expression 3 See also 4 NotesDescription[edit] Christian praxis is something that goes beyond practices, actions, or behaviors. Praxis is described as a combination of reflection and action that realizes the historicity of human persons. In this sense actions are realized in light of the way they affect history. History has to be seen as a whole, combining in an incarnational way, our salvation history and our "human" history.[1] Expression[edit] Most liberation theologians see Christian theological praxis mainly as lived and expressed in the life of community
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The Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter-day Saints
The Church of Jesus
Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints (known as the LDS Church or, informally, the Mormon Church) is a Nontrinitarian, Christian restorationist church that is considered by its members to be the restoration of the original church founded by Jesus
Jesus
Christ. The church is headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah, and has established congregations and built temples worldwide
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Bahá'í Faith
The Baháʼí Faith
Faith
(/bəˈhɑːiː, bəˈhaɪ/; Persian: بهائی‎ Bahāʼi), or Bahaʼism,[1][2][3][4][5] is a religion teaching the essential worth of all religions, and the unity and equality of all people.[6] Established by Baháʼu'lláh in 1863, it initially grew in Per
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Bahá'í Marriage
Bahá'í marriage is union of a man and a woman. Its purpose is mainly spiritual and is to foster harmony, fellowship and unity between the two partners.[1] The Bahá'í teachings on marriage call it a fortress for well-being and salvation and place marriage and the family as the foundation of the structure of human society.[2]Contents1 Spiritual nature 2 Engagement2.1 Waiting period3 Ceremony 4 Laws 5 Children and parenting 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksSpiritual nature[edit] The Bahá'í teachings on marriage see it as an eternal bond that survives past the lives of the partners in the physical life, and into the spiritual worlds. Thus the teachings stress that during courting the partners must take the utmost care to become acquainted with each other's character
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Catholic Church
GodTrinity Pater Filius Spiritus Sanctus Consubstantialitas Filioque Divinum illud munusDivine Law Decalogus Ex Cathedra DeificatioRealms beyond the States of the Church Heaven Purgatory Limbo HellMysterium Fidei Passion of Jesus Crucifixion
Crucifixion
of Jesus Harrowing of Hell Resurrection AscensionBeatæ Mariæ Semper Virginis Mariology Veneration Immaculate Conception Mater Dei Perpetual virginity Assumption TitlesOther teachings Josephology Morality Body Lectures Sexuality Apologetics Divine grace Salvation Original sin Saints DogmaTexts Biblia Sacra S
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Hinduism
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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