HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Chasidic Judaism
Hasidism, sometimes Hasidic Judaism
Judaism
(Hebrew: חסידות‎, translit. hasidut, [χaˈsidus]; originally, "piety"), is a Jewish religious group. It arose as a spiritual revival movement in contemporary Western Ukraine
Western Ukraine
during the 18th century, and spread rapidly throughout Eastern Europe. Today, most affiliates reside in the United States, Israel, and the United Kingdom. Israel
Israel
Ben Eliezer, the " Baal Shem
Baal Shem
Tov", is regarded as its founding father, and his disciples developed and disseminated it. Present-day Hasidism is a sub-group within Ultra-Orthodox ("Haredi") Judaism, and is noted for its religious conservatism and social seclusion
[...More...]

"Chasidic Judaism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hasid (term)
Hasid (Hebrew: חסיד‬, "pious"; plural "Hasidim", חסידים) is a Jewish honorific, frequently used as a term of exceptional respect in the Talmudic and early medieval periods. In classic Rabbinic literature it differs from "Tzadik"-"righteous", by instead denoting one who goes beyond the legal requirements of ritual and ethical Jewish observance in daily life. The literal meaning of "Hasid" derives from Chesed-"kindness", the outward expression of love for God and other people. This spiritual devotion motivates pious conduct beyond everyday limits. The devotional nature of its description lent itself to a few Jewish movements in history being known as "Hasidim". Two of these derived from the Jewish mystical tradition, as it could tend towards piety over legalism. As a personal honorific, both "Hasid" and "Tzadik" could be applied independently to a same individual with both different qualities
[...More...]

"Hasid (term)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jewish Mysticism
Academic study of Jewish mysticism, especially since Gershom Scholem's Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism (1941), distinguishes between different forms of mysticism across different eras of Jewish history. Of these, Kabbalah, which emerged in 12th-century Europe, is the most well known, but not the only typologic form, or the earliest to emerge. Among previous forms were Merkabah
Merkabah
mysticism (c
[...More...]

"Jewish Mysticism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rhineland
The Rhineland
Rhineland
(German: Rheinland, French: Rhénanie) is the name used for a loosely defined area of Western Germany along the Rhine, chiefly its middle section.Contents1 Term 2 Geography 3 History3.1 Pre-Roman 3.2 Roman and Frankish conquests 3.3 Holy Roman Empire 3.4 French Revolution 3.5 Prussian influence 3.6 1918–1945 3.7 Post-19464 See also 5 References 6 Further readingTerm[edit]The Rhine Province
Rhine Province
(green) as of 1830 superimposed on modern borders.Historically, the Rhinelands[1] refers (physically speaking) to a loosely defined region embracing the land on the banks of the Rhine
Rhine
in Central Europe, which were settled by Ripuarian and Salian Franks
Salian Franks
and became part of Frankish Austrasia
[...More...]

"Rhineland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ashkenaz
Ashkenaz
Ashkenaz
in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
is one of the descendants of Noah. Ashkenaz
Ashkenaz
is the first son of Gomer, and a Japhetic
Japhetic
patriarch in the Table of Nations
[...More...]

"Ashkenaz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kabbalah
Kabbalah
Kabbalah
(Hebrew: קַבָּלָה‬, literally "parallel/corresponding," or "received tradition"[1][2]) is an esoteric method, discipline, and school of thought that originated in Judaism. A traditional Kabbalist in Judaism
Judaism
is called a Mekubbal (מְקוּבָּל‬). Kabbalah's definition varies according to the tradition and aims of those following it,[3] from its religious origin as an integral part of Judaism, to its later Christian, New Age, and Occultist/western esoteric syncretic adaptations. Kabbalah
Kabbalah
is a set of esoteric teachings meant to explain the relationship between an unchanging, eternal, and mysterious Ein Sof
Ein Sof
(infinity)[4] and the mortal and finite universe (God's creation). While it is heavily used by some denominations, it is not a religious denomination in itself. It forms the foundations of mystical religious interpretation
[...More...]

"Kabbalah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Jacob Ben Hayyim Zemah
Jacob ben Hayyim Zemah (17th century) was a Portuguese kabalist and physician. He received a medical training in his native country as a Marrano, but fled about 1619 to Safed
Safed
and devoted himself to the Talmud
Talmud
and the casuists ("poseḳim") until 1625; then he went to Damascus, where for eighteen years he studied kabbalah from the Zohar and the writings of Isaac Luria
Isaac Luria
and Hayyim Vital. He finally settled at Jerusalem
Jerusalem
and opened a yeshivah for the study of the Zohar
Zohar
and other kabbalistic works, David Conforte being for some time one of his pupils (Ḳore ha-Dorot, pp. 36a, 49a). Jacob Ẓemaḥ was one of the greatest kabbalists of his period and was a prolific author, his works including treatises of his own as well as compilations of the writings of Ḥayyim Vital
[...More...]

"Jacob Ben Hayyim Zemah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Isaac Luria
Isaac (ben Solomon) Luria Ashkenazi
Ashkenazi
(1534[1] – July 25, 1572) (Hebrew: יִצְחָק בן שלמה לוּרְיָא אשכנזי‬ Yitzhak Ben Sh'lomo Lurya Ashkenazi), commonly known in Jewish religious circles as "Ha'ARI"[2] (meaning "The Lion"), "Ha'ARI Hakadosh" [the holy ARI] or "ARIZaL"[3] [the ARI, Of Blessed Memory (Zikhrono Livrakha)], was a foremost rabbi and Jewish mystic in the community of Safed
Safed
in the Galilee
Galilee
region of Ottoman Syria. He is considered the father of contemporary Kabbalah,[4] his teachings being referred to as Lurianic Kabbalah. While his direct literary contribution to the Kabbalistic school of Safed
Safed
was extremely minute (he wrote only a few poems), his spiritual fame led to their veneration and the acceptance of his authority. The works of his disciples compiled his oral teachings into writing
[...More...]

"Isaac Luria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Shulchan Aruch
The Shulchan Aruch
Shulchan Aruch
(Hebrew: שֻׁלְחָן עָרוּך‬ [ʃulˈħan ʕaˈʁuχ], literally: "Set Table"),[1] also known by various Jewish communities but not all as "the Code of Jewish Law," is the most widely consulted of the various legal codes in Judaism
[...More...]

"Shulchan Aruch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Israel Ben Eliezer
Israel
Israel
ben Eliezer (born circa 1700,[2][3] died 22 May 1760), known as the Baal Shem
Baal Shem
Tov (Hebrew: בעל שם טוב‬, /ˌbɑːl ˈʃɛm ˌtʊv/[4] or /ˌtʊf/) or Besht, was a Jewish mystical
Jewish mystical
rabbi considered the founder of Hasidic Judaism.[2] "Besht" is the acronym for Baal Shem
Baal Shem
Tov, meaning "Master of the Good Name" or "one with a good reputation."[5] The little biographical information about Besht comes from oral traditions handed down by his students ( Jacob
Jacob
Joseph of Polonne
Polonne
and others) and the legendary tales about his life and behavior collected in Shivḥei ha-Besht (In Praise of the Ba'al Shem Tov; Kapust and Berdychiv, 1814–15).[6]. Hasidim approach these legends with a blend of suspicion and belief
[...More...]

"Israel Ben Eliezer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Salomon Maimon
Salomon Maimon (/ˈmaɪmɒn/; German: [ˈmaɪmoːn]; Hebrew: שלמה מימון‎‎; 1753 – 22 November 1800) was a German-speaking philosopher, born of Jewish parentage in present-day Belarus.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Interest in Kabbalah 1.3 In Germany 1.4 In Silesia2 Thought2.1 Thing-in-itself 2.2 Application of the categories 2.3 Doctrine of differentials 2.4 Kant's comments3 Bibliography3.1 Collected works in German 3.2 English translations4 Notes 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksBiography[edit] Early years[edit] Salomon Maimon was born Shlomo ben Joshua[1] in the town of Zhukov Borok near Mir in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania
Grand Duchy of Lithuania
(present-day Belarus), where his grandfather leased an estate from a Prince Karol Stanisław "Panie Kochanku" Radziwiłł. He was taught Torah
Torah
and Talmud, first by his father, and later by instructors in Mir
[...More...]

"Salomon Maimon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Modern Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
or Israeli Hebrew (עברית חדשה‎, ʿivrít ḥadašá[h], [ivˈrit xadaˈʃa] – "Modern Hebrew" or "New Hebrew"), generally referred to by speakers simply as Hebrew (עברית‎ Ivrit), is the standard form of the Hebrew language spoken today. Spoken in ancient times, Hebrew, a member of the Canaanite branch of the Semitic language family, was supplanted as the Jewish vernacular by the western dialect of Aramaic
Aramaic
beginning in the third century BCE, though it continued to be used as a liturgical and literary language
[...More...]

"Modern Hebrew" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tzaddik
Tzadik/Zadik/Sadiq [tsaˈdik] (Hebrew: צדיק‬, "righteous one", pl. tzadikim [tsadiˈkim] צדיקים‬ ṣadiqim) is a title in Judaism
Judaism
given to people considered righteous, such as Biblical figures and later spiritual masters. The root of the word ṣadiq, is ṣ-d-q (צדק‬ tzedek), which means "justice" or "righteousness". The feminine term for a righteous person is tzadeikes/tzaddeket. Tzadik
Tzadik
is also the root of the word tzedakah ('charity', literally 'righteousness')
[...More...]

"Tzaddik" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nevi'im
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t e Nevi'im
Nevi'im
(/nəviˈiːm, nəˈviːɪm/;[1] Hebrew: נְבִיאִים‬ Nəḇî'îm, lit. "spokespersons", "Prophets") is the second main division of the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
(the Tanakh), between the Torah (instruction) and Ketuvim
Ketuvim
(writings). The Nevi'im
Nevi'im
are divided into two groups
[...More...]

"Nevi'im" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Second Temple Period
The Second Temple
Second Temple
period in Jewish history
Jewish history
lasted between 530 BCE and 70 CE,[1] when the Second Temple
Second Temple
of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
existed. The sects of Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, and Zealots were formed during this period. The Second Temple
Second Temple
period ended with the First Jewish–Roman War and the Roman destruction of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
and the Temple. After the death of the last Jewish Prophets of antiquity and still under Persian rule, the leadership of the Jewish people
Jewish people
was in the hands of five successive generations of zugot ("pairs of") leaders. They flourished first under the Persians (c. 539 – c. 332 BCE), then under the Greeks (c
[...More...]

"Second Temple Period" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Apocalyptic Literature
Apocalyptic literature
Apocalyptic literature
is a genre of prophetical writing that developed in post-Exilic Jewish culture and was popular among millennialist early Christians. "Apocalypse" (ἀποκάλυψις) is a Greek word meaning "revelation", "an unveiling or unfolding of things not previously known and which could not be known apart from the unveiling".[1] As a genre, apocalyptic literature details the authors' visions of the end times as revealed by an angel or other heavenly messenger.[2] The apocalyptic literature of
[...More...]

"Apocalyptic Literature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.