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Chartered Surveyors
Chartered Surveyor
Chartered Surveyor
is the description (protected by law in many countries) of Professional Members and Fellows of the RICS
RICS
entitled to use the designation (and a number of variations such as "Chartered Building Surveyor" or "Chartered Quantity Surveyor" or "Chartered Civil Engineering Surveyor" depending on their field of expertise) in Commonwealth countries and Ireland. Chartered originates from the Royal Charter
Royal Charter
granted to the world's first professional body of surveyors. Chartered Surveyors are entitled to use "MRICS" after their names. Chartered Surveyors are highly trained and experienced property professionals. Surveyors offer impartial, specialist advice on a variety of property related issues and the services which they provide are diverse.[1] Chartered Surveyors work in all fields of property and building consultancy
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Law
Law
Law
is a system of rules that are created and enforced through social or governmental institutions to regulate behavior.[2] Law
Law
is a system that regulates and ensures that individuals or a community adhere to the will of the state. State-enforced laws can be made by a collective legislature or by a single legislator, resulting in statutes, by the executive through decrees and regulations, or established by judges through precedent, normally in common law jurisdictions. Private individuals can create legally binding contracts, including arbitration agreements that may elect to accept alternative arbitration to the normal court process. The formation of laws themselves may be influenced by a constitution, written or tacit, and the rights encoded therein
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Hydrographic Surveying
Hydrographic survey
Hydrographic survey
is the science of measurement and description of features which affect maritime navigation, marine construction, dredging, offshore oil exploration/offshore oil drilling and related activities. Strong emphasis is placed on soundings, shorelines, tides, currents, seabed and submerged obstructions that relate to the previously mentioned activities. The term hydrography is used synonymously to describe maritime cartography, which in the final stages of the hydrographic process uses the raw data collected through hydrographic survey into information usable by the end user. Hydrography
Hydrography
is collected under rules which vary depending on the acceptance authority
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Lease
A lease is a contractual arrangement calling for the lessee (user) to pay the lessor (owner) for use of an asset.[1] Property, buildings and vehicles are common assets that are leased. Industrial or business equipment is also leased. Broadly put, a lease agreement is a contract between two parties, the lessor and the lessee. The lessor is the legal owner of the asset; the lessee obtains the right to use the asset in return for regular rental payments.[2] The lessee also agrees to abide by various conditions regarding their use of the property or equipment. For example, a person leasing a car may agree that the car will only be used for personal use. The narrower term rental agreement can be used to describe a lease in which the asset is tangible property.[3] Language used is that the user rents the land or goods let out or rented out by the owner
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Insurance Company
Insurance
Insurance
is a means of protection from financial loss. It is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent, uncertain loss. An entity which provides insurance is known as an insurer, insurance company, insurance carrier or underwriter. A person or entity who buys insurance is known as an insured or policyholder. The insurance transaction involves the insured assuming a guaranteed and known relatively small loss in the form of payment to the insurer in exchange for the insurer's promise to compensate the insured in the event of a covered loss
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General Contractor
A general contractor (main contractor, prime contractor)[1] is responsible for the day-to-day oversight of a construction site, management of vendors and trades, and the communication of information to all involved parties throughout the course of a building project.[2]Contents1 Description 2 Responsibilities 3 UK and Commonwealth usage 4 Licensing requirements 5 Licensing qualifications 6 As a business owner 7 General contractor example 8 See also 9 ReferencesDescription[edit] The general contractor is a manager, and possibly a tradesman, employed by the client on the advice of the architect, engineer or the client him/herself if acting as the manager. A general contractor is responsible for the overall coordination of a project.[3] A general contractor must first assess the project-specific documents (referred to as bid, proposal or tender documents)
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Subcontractor
A subcontractor is an individual or in many cases a business that signs a contract to perform part or all of the obligations of another's contract. A subcontractor is a person who is hired by a general contractor (or prime contractor, or main contractor) to perform a specific task as part of the overall project and is normally paid for services provided to the project by the originating general contractor. While the most common concept of a subcontractor is in building works and civil engineering, the range of opportunities for subcontractor is much wider and it is possible that the greatest number now operate in the information technology and information sectors of business. The incentive to hire subcontractors is either to reduce costs or to mitigate project risks. In this way, the general contractor receives the same or better service than the general contractor could have provided by itself, at lower overall risk
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Cost Engineering
Cost engineering is "the engineering practice devoted to the management of project cost, involving such activities as estimating, cost control, cost forecasting, investment appraisal and risk analysis."[1] "Cost Engineers budget, plan and monitor investment projects. They seek the optimum balance between cost, quality and time requirements."[2] Skills and knowledge of cost engineers are similar to those of quantity surveyors. In many industries, cost engineering is synonymous with project controls. As the title "engineer" has legal requirements in many jurisdictions (i.e
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Project Manager
A project manager is a professional in the field of project management. Project
Project
managers have the responsibility of the planning, procurement and execution of a project, in any undertaking that has a defined scope, defined start and a defined finish; regardless of industry. Project
Project
managers are first point of contact for any issues or discrepancies arising from within the heads of various departments in an organization before the problem escalates to higher authorities. Project management
Project management
is the responsibility of a project manager
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Cartography
Cartography
Cartography
(from Greek χάρτης khartēs, "papyrus, sheet of paper, map"; and γράφειν graphein, "write") is the study and practice of making maps. Combining science, aesthetics, and technique, cartography builds on the premise that reality can be modeled in ways that communicate spatial information effectively. The fundamental problems of traditional cartography are to:Set the map's agenda and select traits of the object to be mapped. This is the concern of map editing. Traits may be physical, such as roads or land masses, or may be abstract, such as toponyms or political boundaries. Represent the terrain of the mapped object on flat media. This is the concern of map projections. Eliminate characteristics of the mapped object that are not relevant to the map's purpose. This is the concern of generalization. Reduce the complexity of the characteristics that will be mapped
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Cadastre
A cadastre (also spelled cadaster) is a comprehensive land recording of the real estate or real property's metes-and-bounds of a country.[1][2] In most countries, legal systems have developed around the original administrative systems and use the cadastre to define the dimensions and location of land parcels described in legal documentation. The cadastre is a fundamental source of data in disputes and lawsuits between landowners. In the United States, Cadastral Survey within the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) maintains records of all public lands
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Estate Sale
An estate sale or estate liquidation is a sale or auction to dispose of a substantial portion of the materials owned by a person who is recently deceased or who must dispose of their personal property to facilitate a move.[1]Contents1 Reasons for an estate sale 2 Conduct2.1 Admittance procedure2.1.1 Street numbers 2.1.2 Sign-up Sheet3 See also 4 References 5 External linksReasons for an estate sale[edit] The most common reasons for an estate sale is the death of the property owner,[2] and the consequent need to quickly liquidate the deceased's belongings for any number of reasons:The survivors/heirs may have no interest in the bulk of the personal belongings left by the deceased The survivors/heirs may simply lack space to keep the belongings The survivors/heirs cannot agree to the disposition of tangible property, and thus a court has ordered the goods to be sold, with the proceeds to be divided among the survivors (after payment of the
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Solicitor
A solicitor is a legal practitioner who traditionally deals with most of the legal matters in some jurisdictions. A person must have legally-defined qualifications, which vary from one jurisdiction to another, to be described as a solicitor and enabled to practise there as such. For example, in England and Wales
England and Wales
a solicitor is admitted to practise under the provisions of the Solicitors Act 1974. With some exceptions, practising solicitors must possess a practising certificate. There are many more solicitors than barristers in England; they undertake the general aspects of giving legal advice and conducting legal proceedings.[1] In the United Kingdom, a few Australian states, Hong Kong, South Africa (where they are called attorneys) and Ireland, the legal profession is split between solicitors and barristers (called advocates in some countries), and a lawyer will usually only hold one of the two titles
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Compulsory Purchase
Eminent domain
Eminent domain
(United States, Philippines), land acquisition (Singapore), compulsory purchase (United Kingdom, New Zealand, Ireland), resumption (Hong Kong, Uganda), resumption/compulsory acquisition (Australia), or expropriation (France, Italy, Mexico, South Africa, Canada, Brazil, Portugal, Spain, Chile, Denmark, Sweden) is the power of a state, provincial, or national government to take private property for public use. However, this power can be legislatively delegated by the state to municipalities, government subdivisions, or even to private persons or corporations, when they are authorized by the legislature to exercise the functions of public character.[1] In the Anglo-American historical context, property taken could be used only by the government taking the property in question
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Andy Irvine (rugby Union)
Andrew Robertson Irvine MBE (born 16 September 1951) is a former President of the Scottish Rugby Union
Scottish Rugby Union
(SRU), and a former Scottish international rugby player.[1] He earned fifty one Scottish caps, captaining the team on fifteen occasions, and scored 250 points for Scotland.[2] He went on three British and Irish Lions
British and Irish Lions
tours.Contents1 Background 2 Rugby career2.1 Amateur career 2.2 Provincial career 2.3 International career 2.4 Executive rugby positions3 Property career 4 Other activities 5 Awards and honours 6 Bibliography 7 References 8 External linksBackground[edit] Irvine was born in Edinburgh, on 16 September 1951
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Rugby Union
Rugby union, commonly known in most of the world as rugby,[3] is a contact team sport which originated in England
England
in the first half of the 19th century.[4] One of the two codes of rugby football, it is based on running with the ball in hand. In its most common form, a game is between two teams of 15 players using an oval-shaped ball on a rectangular field with H-shaped goalposts on each try line. Rugby union
Rugby union
is a popular sport around the world, played by male and female players of all ages. In 2014, there were more than 6 million people playing worldwide, of whom 2.36 million were registered players
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