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Charro
A charro is a traditional horseman from Mexico, originating in the central-western regions primarily in the states of Jalisco, Zacatecas, Durango, Chihuahua, Aguascalientes
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Mexican Plateau
The Central Mexican Plateau, also known as the Mexican Altiplano (Spanish: Altiplanicie Mexicana), is a large arid-to-semiarid plateau that occupies much of northern and central Mexico. Averaging 1,825 m (5,988 ft) above sea level, it extends from the United States border in the north to the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt in the south, and is bounded by the Sierra Madre Occidental
Sierra Madre Occidental
and Sierra Madre Oriental to the west and east, respectively. A low east-west mountain range in the state of Zacatecas
Zacatecas
divides the plateau into northern and southern sections
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Genre
Genre
Genre
(/ˈʒɒ̃rə, ˈʒɒn-, ˈdʒɒn-/; from French genre, meaning 'kind' or 'sort') is any form or type of communication in any mode (written, spoken, digital, artistic, etc.) with socially-agreed upon conventions developed over time. Genre
Genre
is most popularly known as a category of literature, music, or other forms of art or entertainment, whether written or spoken, audio or visual, based on some set of stylistic criteria, yet genres can be aesthetic, rhetorical, communicative, or functional. Genres form by conventions that change over time as cultures invent new genres and discontinue the use of old ones. Often, works fit into multiple genres by way of borrowing and recombining these conventions
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Ciudad Rodrigo
Ciudad Rodrigo
Ciudad Rodrigo
(Spanish pronunciation: [θi̯uˈðað roˈðɾiɣo]) is a small cathedral city in the province of Salamanca,[3] in western Spain, with a population in 2016 of 12,896. It is also the seat of a judicial district. The site of Ciudad Rodrigo, perched atop a rocky rise on the right bank of the River Águeda, has been occupied since the Neolithic Age. Known also as Mirobriga by those who wish to associate the city with an ancient Celtic village in the outskirts of the modern city. A key border fortress, it was the site of a 10-day siege by the Duke of Wellington and its capture from the French opened
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Vitigudino
Vitigudino
Vitigudino
is a village and municipality in the province of Salamanca, western Spain, part of the autonomous community of Castile-Leon. It is located 67 kilometers from the provincial capital city of Salamanca and has a population of 2,634 people. Geography[edit] The municipality covers an area of 52 km². It lies 769 meters above sea level and the post code is 37210. See also[edit] List of municipalities in Salamanca References[edit]^ a b "Municipio: Vitigudino". www.lasalina.es. Retrieved 2017-11-07.  ^ "Salamanca: Población por municipios y sexo". www.ine.es (in Spanish)
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Alba De Tormes
Alba de Tormes
Alba de Tormes
is a municipality in the province of Salamanca, western Spain, part of the autonomous community of Castile and León. The town is on the River Tormes
River Tormes
upstream from the city of Salamanca. Alba gave its name to one of Spain's most important dukedoms
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Golden Age Of Mexican Cinema
The Golden Age of Mexican cinema
Golden Age of Mexican cinema
(in Spanish Época de Oro del Cine Mexicano) is a period in the history of the Cinema of Mexico
Cinema of Mexico
between 1933 and 1964[1] when the Mexican film industry reached high levels of production, quality and economic success of its films, besides having gained recognition internationally. The Mexican film industry became the center of commercial films in Latin America. The Golden Age began symbolically with the film Vámonos con Pancho Villa (1935), directed by Fernando de Fuentes. In 1939, during World War II, the film industry in the US and Europe
Europe
declined, because the materials previously destined for film production now were for the new arms industry. Many countries began to focus on making films about war, leaving the opportunity to Mexico, to produce commercial films for the Mexican and Latin American markets
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José Alfredo Jiménez
José Alfredo Jiménez-Sandoval (Spanish pronunciation: [xoˈse alˈfɾeðo xiˈmenes]; 19 January 1926 – 23 November 1973) was a Mexican singer-songwriter of rancheras, whose songs are considered an integral part of Mexico's musical heritage. Jiménez was born in Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato. According to the singer Miguel Aceves Mejía, he did not play an instrument and did not even know the Spanish word for "waltz" or what "keys" his songs were in.[1] Nonetheless, he composed more than 1,000 songs
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State Of Mexico
The State of Mexico
Mexico
(Spanish: Estado de México, pronounced [esˈtaðo ðe ˈmexiko] ( listen)) is one of the 32 federal entities of Mexico. It is the most populous, as well as the most densely populated state. It is divided into 125 municipalities and its capital city is Toluca
Toluca
de Lerdo. The State of Mexico
Mexico
is often abbreviated to "Edomex" from Estado de México in Spanish, to distinguish it from the name of the whole country. It is located in South-Central Mexico
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Hacienda
An hacienda (UK: /ˌhæsiˈɛndə/ or US: /ˌhɑːsiˈɛndə/; Spanish: [aˈθjenda] or [aˈsjenda]), in the colonies of the Spanish Empire, is an estate, similar in form to a Roman villa. Some haciendas were plantations, mines or factories. Many haciendas combined these productive activities. The term hacienda is imprecise, but usually refers to landed estates of significant size. Smaller holdings were termed estancias or ranchos that were owned almost exclusively by Spaniards and criollos and in rare cases by mixed-race individuals.[1] In Argentina, the term estancia is used for large estates that in Mexico
Mexico
would be termed haciendas. In recent decades, the term has been used in the United States to refer to an architectural style associated with the earlier estate manor houses. The hacienda system of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, El Salvador, Mexico, New Granada and Peru
Peru
was a system of large land holdings
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Chamois
The chamois ( Rupicapra
Rupicapra
rupicapra) is a species of goat-antelope native to mountains in Europe, including the European Alps, the Pyrenees, the Carpathians, the Tatra Mountains, the Balkans, parts of Turkey, the Caucasus, and the Apennines.[2] The chamois has also been introduced to the South Island
South Island
of New Zealand. Some subspecies of chamois are strictly protected in the EU under the European Habitats Directive.[3]Contents1 Names 2 Taxonomy 3 Description 4 Biology and behaviour 5 Distribution and habitat 6 Chamois
Chamois
in New Zealand 7 Hunting and wildlife management 8 Chamois
Chamois
leather 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksNames[edit] Chamois
Chamois
herd engraved on reindeer antler from Gourdan grotto, Haute Garonne.The English name comes from French chamois
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Agave
See text. See also full listing. Agave
Agave
(US: /əˈɡɑːvi/, UK: /əˈɡeɪvi/, /əˈɡɑːvi/,[1] Anglo-Hispanic: /əˈɡɑːveɪ/[2]) is a genus of monocots native to the hot and arid regions of Mexico
Mexico
and the Southwestern United States. Some agave species are also native to tropical areas of South America. The plants are perennial, but each rosette flowers once and then dies (see semelparity). Some species are known by the name "century plant".[3] Agave
Agave
tequilana, agave azul or blue agave, is used in the production of tequila
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Mexican War Of Independence
Mexican independence First Mexican Empire
First Mexican Empire
gains independence from Spain Signing of the Declaration of Independence of the Mexican EmpireTerritorial changes Spain
Spain
loses the continental area of Viceroyalty of New SpainBelligerents Insurgents Army of the Three Guarantees
Army of the Three Guarantees
(1821) Spanish Empire Mexican royalistsCommanders and leaders Miguel Hidalgo  (1810–11) Ignacio Allende  (1810–11) Ignacio López R. † (1810–11) José María Morelos  (1810–15) Vicente Guerrero
Vicente Guerrero
(1810–21) Mariano Matamoros  (1811–14) Guadalupe Victoria
Guadalupe Victoria
(1812–21) Francisco Xavier Mina  (1817) Agustín de Iturbide (1821) Ferdinand VII Francisco Venegas (1810–13) Félix María Calleja (1813–16) Juan Ruiz de A
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Indigenous Peoples Of The Americas
The indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
are the pre-Columbian peoples of the Americas
Americas
and their descendants. Although some indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
were traditionally hunter-gatherers—and many, especially in the Amazon basin, still are—many groups practiced aquaculture and agriculture. The impact of their agricultural endowment to the world is a testament to their time and work in reshaping and cultivating the flora indigenous to the Americas.[24] Although some societies depended heavily on agriculture, others practiced a mix of farming, hunting and gathering
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Mestizo
Mestizo
Mestizo
(/mɛˈstiːzoʊ, mɪ-/;[1] Spanish: [mesˈtiθo], American Spanish: [-ˈtiso]) is a term traditionally used in Spain, Latin America, and to a lesser extent, in the Philippines
Philippines
which originally meant a person of combined European and American Indian descent, regardless of where the person was born. The term was used as an ethnic/racial category in the casta system that was in use during the Spanish Empire's control of their American colonies. Nowadays though, particularly in Latin America, Mestizo
Mestizo
has become more of a cultural term, with culturally mainstream Latin Americans regarded or termed as Mestizos regardless of their actual ancestry, and with the term "Indian" being reserved exclusively for people who have maintained a separate indigenous ethnic identity, language, tribal affiliation, etc
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Tlaxcaltec
The Tlaxcalans, or Talaxcaltec, were an indigenous group of Nahua ethnicity who inhabited the republic of Tlaxcala
Tlaxcala
located in what is now the Mexican state
Mexican state
of Tlaxcala. Pre-Columbian history[edit] The Tlaxcaltecs were originally a conglomeration of three distinct ethnic groups who spoke Nahuatl, Otomi, and Pinome. Eventually, the Nahuatl
Nahuatl
speakers became the dominant ethnic group.[1] Despite early attempts by the Mexica, the Tlaxcalteca were never conquered by the Aztec Triple Alliance
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