HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Charlton Heston
Charlton Heston
Charlton Heston
(born John Charles Carter or Charlton John Carter; October 4, 1923 – April 5, 2008)[1][2] was an American actor and political activist.[3] As a Hollywood
Hollywood
star, he appeared in 100 films over the course of 60 years. He played Moses
Moses
in the epic film, The Ten Commandments (1956), for which he received his first nomination for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama.[4] He also starred in Touch of Evil (1958) with Orson Welles, Ben-Hur (1959), for which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor, El Cid (1961), and Planet of the Apes (1968)
[...More...]

picture info

Wilmette, Illinois
Wilmette is a village in New Trier
Trier
Township, Cook County, Illinois, United States. It is located 14 miles (23 km) north of Chicago's downtown district (4 mi or 6 km from Chicago's northern border) and had a population at the 2010 census of 27,087.[4] Wilmette is considered a bedroom community in the North Shore region. In 2007, Wilmette was ranked as the seventh best place to raise children in the U.S., according to Business Week.[5] In 2015, Wilmette was ranked the best place to live in Illinois
Illinois
based on a variety of factors including its low unemployment rate, median income, low housing vacancy rate, high education expenditures per student, low crime, and short commute times.[6] Wilmette is home to 2 of Illinois' 17 elementary schools (Romona Elementary, St
[...More...]

picture info

Chicago
Chicago
Chicago
(/ʃɪˈkɑːɡoʊ, -ˈkɔː-/ ( listen)), officially the City
City
of Chicago, is the third most populous city in the United States. With over 2.7 million residents, it is also the most populous city in both the state of Illinois
Illinois
and the Midwestern United States. It is the county seat of Cook County
[...More...]

picture info

Conservatism In The United States
American conservatism is a broad system of political beliefs in the United States
United States
that is characterized by respect for American traditions, Republicanism, support for Judeo-Christian values,[1] moral absolutism,[2] free markets and free trade,[3][4] anti-communism,[4][5] individualism,[4] advocacy of American exceptionalism[6], and a defense of Western culture
Western culture
from the perceived threats posed by socialism, authoritarianism, and moral relativism.[7] Liberty
Liberty
for people who conform to Anglo-American
Anglo-American
values[8], economic freedom, social conservatism, and promotion of Judaeo-Christian[1] ideals are core beliefs, with a particular emphasis on strengthening the free market, limiting the size and scope of government in the economy, and opposition to high taxes and government or labor union encroachment on the entrepreneur
[...More...]

Political Action Committee
In the United States, a political action committee (PAC) is a 527 organization that pools campaign contributions from members and donates those funds to campaigns for or against candidates, ballot initiatives, or legislation.[1][2] The legal term PAC has been created in pursuit of campaign finance reform in the United States. This term is quite specific to all activities of campaign finance in the United States. Democracies of other countries use different terms for the units of campaign spending or spending on political competition (see political finance). At the U.S
[...More...]

picture info

Alzheimer's Disease
Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease
(AD), also referred to simply as Alzheimer's, is a chronic neurodegenerative disease that usually starts slowly and worsens over time.[1][2] It is the cause of 60% to 70% of cases of dementia.[1][2] The most common early symptom is difficulty in remembering recent events (short-term memory loss).[1] As the disease advances, symptoms can include problems with language, disorientation (including easily getting lost), mood swings, loss of motivation, not managing self care, and behavioural issues.[1][2] As a
[...More...]

Married And Maiden Names
When a person (traditionally the wife in many cultures) assumes the family name of his or her spouse, that name replaces the person's birth surname, which in the case of the wife is called the maiden name (birth name is also used as a gender-neutral or masculine substitute for maiden name), whereas a married name is a family name or surname adopted by a person upon marriage. In some jurisdictions, changing one's name requires a legal procedure. Nevertheless, in some jurisdictions anyone who either marries or divorces may change his or her name
[...More...]

picture info

Sawmill
A sawmill or lumber mill is a facility where logs are cut into lumber. Before the invention of the sawmill, boards were made in various manual ways, either rived (split) and planed, hewn, or more often hand sawn by two men with a whipsaw, one above and another in a saw pit below. The earliest known mechanical mill is the Hierapolis
Hierapolis
sawmill, a Roman water-powered stone mill at Hierapolis, Asia Minor
Asia Minor
dating back to the 3rd century AD. Other water-powered mills followed and by the 11th century they were widespread in Spain and North Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia, and in the next few centuries, spread across Europe. The circular motion of the wheel was converted to a reciprocating motion at the saw blade. Generally, only the saw was powered, and the logs had to be loaded and moved by hand
[...More...]

picture info

Evanston, Illinois
Evanston (/ˈɛvənˌstən/) is a city in Cook County, Illinois, United States, 12 miles (19 km) north of downtown Chicago, bordered by Chicago
Chicago
to the south, Skokie to the west, and Wilmette to the north. It had a population of 74,486 as of 2010[update].[6] It is one of the North Shore communities that adjoin Lake Michigan
Lake Michigan
and is the home of Northwestern University
[...More...]

picture info

Scottish People
 Scotland   4,446,000 (2011)(Scottish descent only)[2] United StatesB5,457,798[3](Scottish descent)3,056,848[3]Scotch-Irish descent) CanadaC4,799,005[4] Australia2,023,474[5] EnglandD795,000[6] Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
E760,620[citation needed] Argentina100,000[citation needed] Chile80,000[citation needed] Brazil45,000[citation needed] France45,000[citation needed] Poland15,000
[...More...]

picture info

Beverly Hills, California
Beverly Hills is a city located in Los Angeles
Los Angeles
County, California, United States. Beverly Hills is surrounded by the cities of Los Angeles and West Hollywood. Sometimes referred to as "90210," one of its primary ZIP codes, it is home to many celebrities, several hotels, and the Rodeo Drive
Rodeo Drive
shopping district. Originally a Spanish ranch where lima beans were grown, Beverly Hills was incorporated in 1914 by a group of investors who had failed to find oil, but found water instead and eventually decided to develop it into a town
[...More...]

picture info

English People
The English people
English people
are a nation and an ethnic group native to England who speak the English language. The English identity is of early medieval origin, when they were known in Old English
Old English
as the Angelcynn ("family of the Angles")
[...More...]

picture info

Sunderland
Sunderland
Sunderland
(/ˈsʌndərlənd/ ( listen), locally /ˈsʊndlənd/) is a city at the centre of the City of Sunderland metropolitan borough, in Tyne and Wear, North East England, 10 miles southeast of Newcastle upon Tyne, 12 miles northeast of Durham, 101 miles southeast of Edinburgh, 104 miles north-northeast of Manchester and 240 miles north of London
[...More...]

picture info

1930 United States Census
The Fifteenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau one month from April 1, 1930, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 122,775,046, an increase of 13.7 percent over the 106,021,537 persons enumerated during the 1920 Census.Contents1 Census questions 2 Data availability 3 State rankings 4 City rankings 5 Notes 6 External linksCensus questions[edit] DCC bbb The 1930 Census collected the following information:[1]address name relationship to head of family home owned or rentedif owned, value of home if rented, monthly rentwhether owned a radio set whether on a farm sex race age marital status and, if married, age at first marriage school attendance literacy birthplace of person, and their parents if foreign born:language spoken at home before coming to the U
[...More...]

picture info

Richfield Township, Roscommon County, Michigan
Richfield Township is a civil township of Roscommon County in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the township had a total population of 4,139.Contents1 Geography 2 Demographics 3 Government 4 Notes 5 External linksGeography[edit] According to the United States Census
Census
Bureau, the township has a total area of 72.9 square miles (188.8 km²), of which 68.9 square miles (178.5 km²) is land and 4.0 square miles (10.4 km²) is water, for a total area of 5.50% water. Demographics[edit] As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 4,139 people, 1,896 households, and 1,239 families residing in the township. The population density was 60.1 per square mile (23.2/km²). There were 3,760 housing units at an average density of 54.6 per square mile (21.1/km²)
[...More...]

picture info

Henrik Ibsen
Henrik Johan Ibsen
Ibsen
(/ˈɪbsən/;[1] Norwegian: [ˈhɛnrɪk ˈɪpsn̩]; 20 March 1828 – 23 May 1906) was a Norwegian playwright and theatre director. As one of the founders of modernism in theatre, Ibsen
Ibsen
is often referred to as "the father of realism" and one of the most influential playwrights of his time.[2] His major works include Brand, Peer Gynt, An Enemy of the People, Emperor and Galilean, A Doll's House, Hedda Gabler, Ghosts, The Wild Duck, When We Dead Awaken, Rosmersholm, and The Master Builder
[...More...]