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Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
(French: [ʃaʁl pɛʁo]; 12 January 1628 – 16 May 1703) was a French author and member of the Académie Française. He laid the foundations for a new literary genre, the fairy tale, with his works derived from pre-existing folk tales
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François Mansart
François Mansart
François Mansart
(23 January 1598 – 23 September 1666) was a French architect credited with introducing classicism into Baroque architecture of France. The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
cites him as the most accomplished of 17th-century French architects whose works "are renowned for their high degree of refinement, subtlety, and elegance".[1] Mansart, as he is generally known, made extensive use of a four-sided, double slope gambrel roof punctuated with windows on the steeper lower slope, creating additional habitable space in the garrets[2] that ultimately became named after him—the mansard roof.Contents1 Career 2 Gallery 3 References 4 Further readingCareer[edit] François Mansart
François Mansart
was born to a master carpenter in Paris. He was not trained as an architect; his relatives helped train him in as a stonemason and a sculptor
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Charles Le Brun
Charles Le Brun
Charles Le Brun
(24 February 1619 – 12 February 1690) was a French painter, art theorist, interior decorator and a director of several art schools of his time. As court painter to Louis XIV, who declared him "the greatest French artist of all time", he was a dominant figure in 17th-century French art and much influenced by Nicolas Poussin.[1]Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life and training 1.2 Success years 1.3 Later years2 Le Brun's work and legacy 3 Partial anthology of works 4 Gallery 5 References and sourcesBiography[edit]Portrait of Nicolas Le Brun by Charles Le Brun, ca. 1635, Residenzgalerie, SalzburgVenus Clipping Cupid’s Wings, ca
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Amable De Bourzeys
Amable de Bourzeis (6 April 1606, Volvic
Volvic
– 2 August 1672, Paris) was a French churchman, writer, hellenist, and Academician. A founding member of the Académie française, in 1663 Jean-Baptiste Colbert also made him one of the five founding members of the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres. Publications (partial list)[edit]Discours à monseigneur le prince palatin pour l'exhorter à entrer dans la communion de l'Église catholique, 1646, Read online Lettre d'un abbé à un président, sur la conformité de Augustin d'Hippone avec le concile de Trente, touchant la manière dont les justes peuvent délaisser Dieu, et estre ensuite délaissez de luy, 1649 Contre l'adversaire du concile de Trente et de sainct Augustin : dialogue premier, où l'on découvre la confusion & les contradictions estranges des dogmes théologiques du P
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Jacques Cassagne
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Cassagne
Cassagne
is a commune in the Haute-Garonne
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Classical Antiquity
Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
(also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome, collectively known as the Greco-Roman world. It is the period in which Greek and Roman society flourished and wielded great influence throughout Europe, North Africa
North Africa
and Western Asia. Conventionally, it is taken to begin with the earliest-recorded Epic Greek poetry of Homer
Homer
(8th–7th century BC), and continues through the emergence of Christianity
Christianity
and the decline of the Roman Empire (5th century AD)
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Louvre
8.1 million (2017)Ranked 1st nationally Ranked 1st globallyDirector Jean-Luc MartinezCurator Marie-Laure de RochebrunePublic transit accessPalais Royal – Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
Louvre-Rivoli Website www.louvre.frThe Louvre
Louvre
(US: /ˈluːv(rə)/),[1] or the Louvre
Louvre
Museum (French: Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
[myze dy luvʁ] ( listen)), is the world's largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine
Seine
in the city's 1st arrondissement (district or ward)
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Gian Lorenzo Bernini
Gian Lorenzo Bernini
Gian Lorenzo Bernini
(Italian pronunciation: [ˈdʒan loˈrɛntso berˈniːni]; also Gianlorenzo or Giovanni Lorenzo; 7 December 1598 – 28 November 1680) was an Italian sculptor and architect.[1] While a major figure in the world of architecture, he was, also and even more prominently, the leading sculptor of his age, credited with creating the Baroque style
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Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Paris
Paris
(French pronunciation: ​[paʁi] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city in France, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015).[5] The city is a commune and department, and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilometre (4,638-square-mile) Île-de-
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Louise De La Vallière
Gender: Female, MaleLook up Louise or Luise in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Louise
Louise
or Luise may refer to: People with the given name Louise
Louise
or Luise
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Alcestis (play)
Alcestis
Alcestis
(/ælˈsɛstɪs/; Greek: Ἄλκηστις, Alkēstis) is an Athenian tragedy by the ancient Greek playwright Euripides.[1] It was first produced at the City Dionysia
Dionysia
festival in 438 BC
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Académie Française
The Académie française
Académie française
(French pronunciation: ​[akademi fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is the pre-eminent French council for matters pertaining to the French language. The Académie was officially established in 1635 by Cardinal Richelieu, the chief minister to King Louis XIII.[1] Suppressed in 1793 during the French Revolution, it was restored as a division of the Institut de France
France
in 1803 by Napoleon
Napoleon
Bonaparte.[1] It is the oldest of the five académies of the institute. The Académie consists of forty members, known informally as les immortels (the immortals).[2] New members are elected by the members of the Académie itself. Academicians hold office for life, but they may resign or be dismissed for misconduct
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Euripides
Euripides
Euripides
(/jʊəˈrɪpɪdiːz/ or /jɔːˈrɪpɪdiːz/;[1] Greek: Εὐριπίδης; Ancient Greek: [eu̯.riː.pí.dɛːs]) (c. 480 – c. 406 BC) was a tragedian of classical Athens. Along with Aeschylus
Aeschylus
and Sophocles, he is one of the three ancient Greek tragedians for whom a significant number of plays have survived. Some ancient scholars attributed 95 plays to him but, according to the Suda, it was 92 at most. Of these, 18 or 19 have survived more or less complete (there has been debate about his authorship of Rhesus, largely on stylistic grounds)[2] and there are also fragments, some substantial, of most of the other plays
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Isaac De Benserade
Isaac de Benserade
Isaac de Benserade
(French: [bɛ̃.sʁad]; baptized 5 November 1613 – 10 October 1691) was a French poet. Born in Lyons-la-Forêt
Lyons-la-Forêt
in the Province of Normandy, his family appears to have been connected with Richelieu, who bestowed on him a pension of 600 livres. He began his literary career with the tragedy of Cléopâtre (1635), which was followed by four other pieces. On Richelieu's death Benserade lost his pension, but became more and more a favourite at court, especially with Anne of Austria.[1] Benserade provided the words for the court ballets, and was, in 1674, admitted to the Academy, where he wielded considerable influence. In 1675 he provided the quatrains to accompany the thirty nine hydraulic sculpture groups depicting Aesop's fables
Aesop's fables
in the labyrinth of Versailles
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Philippe Quinault
Philippe Quinault
Philippe Quinault
(French: [kino]; 3 June 1635 – 26 November 1688), French dramatist and librettist, was born in Paris. Biography[edit] Quinault was educated by the liberality of François Tristan l'Hermite, the author of Marianne. Quinault's first play was produced at the Hôtel de Bourgogne in 1653, when he was only eighteen. The piece succeeded, and Quinault followed it up, but he also read for the bar; and in 1660, when he married a widow with money, he bought himself a place in the Cour des Comptes. Then he tried tragedies (Agrippa, etc.) with more success. He received one of the literary pensions then recently established, and was elected to the Académie française
Académie française
in 1670. Up to this time he had written some sixteen or seventeen comedies, tragedies, and tragi-comedies, of which the tragedies were mostly of very small value and the tragi-comedies of little more
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Opera
Opera
Opera
(Italian: [ˈɔːpera]; English plural: operas; Italian plural: opere [ˈɔːpere]) is an art form in which singers and musicians perform a dramatic work combining text (libretto) and musical score, usually in a theatrical setting.[1] In traditional opera, singers do two types of singing: recitative, a speech-inflected style[2] and arias, a more melodic style, in which notes are sung in a sustained fashion. Opera
Opera
incorporates many of the elements of spoken theatre, such as acting, scenery, and costumes and sometimes includes dance
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