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Charles Perrault
CHARLES PERRAULT (French: ; 12 January 1628 – 16 May 1703) was a French author and member of the Académie Française
Académie Française
. He laid the foundations for a new literary genre , the fairy tale , with his works derived from pre-existing folk tales . The best known of his tales include Le Petit Chaperon Rouge ( Little Red Riding Hood
Little Red Riding Hood
), Cendrillon ( Cinderella
Cinderella
), Le Chat Botté ( Puss in Boots ), La Belle au bois Dormant (The Sleeping Beauty ), and Barbe Bleue ( Bluebeard ). Some of Perrault's versions of old stories have influenced the German versions published by the Brothers Grimm more than 100 years later. The stories continue to be printed and have been adapted to opera, ballet (such as Tchaikovsky 's The Sleeping Beauty ), theatre, and film
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Philippe Lallemand
PHILIPPE LALLEMAND (or LALLEMANT or LALEMEN; 1636 – 22 March 1716) was a French portrait painter of the lesser rank, born at Reims
Reims
. He was influenced by Robert de Nanteuil (1623–1678). The 19th-century confusion with Georges Lallemand of Nancy, a teacher of Nicolas Poussin , Philippe de Champaigne
Philippe de Champaigne
and Laurent de La Hyre
Laurent de La Hyre
, has long been cleared up. His morceaux de reception for the Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture in 1672 were his portraits of the author Charles Perrault and of the financier Gédéon Berbier du Metz, president of the Chambre des Comptes . Lallemand died in Paris in 1716. A monograph was Max. Sutaine, Philippe Lallemant, peintre de Reims XVIIe siècle (Paris: Regnier) 1856. NOTES * ^ "Lallemant, Philippe", vol. 8, p. 333, in Benezit Dictionary of Artists , 2006
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Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 _Population without double counting _: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. PARIS (locally ( listen )) is the capital and most populous city of France
France
. It has an area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and a population of 2,229,621 in 2015 within its administrative limits. The city is both a commune and department and forms the centre and headquarters of the Île-de- France
France
, or Paris
Paris
Region, which has an area of 12,012 square kilometres (4,638 square miles) and a population in 2016 of 12,142,802, comprising roughly 18 percent of the population of France
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Fairy Tale
A FAIRY TALE is a type of short story that typically features folkloric fantasy characters, such as dwarfs , dragons , elves , fairies , giants , gnomes , goblins , griffins , mermaids , talking animals , trolls , unicorns , or witches , and usually magic or enchantments . Fairy tales may be distinguished from other folk narratives such as legends (which generally involve belief in the veracity of the events described) and explicitly moral tales, including beast fables . The term is mainly used for stories with origins in European tradition and, at least in recent centuries, mostly relates to children\'s literature . In less technical contexts, the term is also used to describe something blessed with unusual happiness, as in "fairy tale ending" (a happy ending ) or "fairy tale romance ", though not all fairy tales end happily
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Sleeping Beauty
"SLEEPING BEAUTY" (French : La Belle au bois dormant "The Beauty Sleeping in the Wood") by Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
, or "LITTLE BRIAR ROSE" (German : Dornröschen) by the Brothers Grimm , is a classic fairy tale which involves a beautiful princess, a sleeping enchantment , and a handsome prince. The version collected by the Brothers Grimm was an orally transmitted version of the originally literary tale published by Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
in Histoires ou contes du temps passé in 1697. This in turn was based on Sun, Moon, and Talia by Italian poet Giambattista Basile (published posthumously in 1634), which was in turn based on one or more folk tales . The earliest known version of the story is found in the narrative Perceforest , composed between 1330 and 1344 and first printed in 1528
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Puss In Boots
"MASTER CAT, OR THE BOOTED CAT" (Italian : Il gatto con gli stivali; French : Le Maître chat ou le Chat botté), commonly known in English as "PUSS IN BOOTS", is a European literary fairy tale about a cat who uses trickery and deceit to gain power, wealth, and the hand of a princess in marriage for his penniless and low-born master. The oldest record of written history dates from Italian author Giovanni Francesco Straparola , who included it in his The Facetious Nights of Straparola (c. 1550–53) in XIV–XV. Another version was published in 1634 by Giambattista Basile with the title Cagliuso, and a tale was written in French at the close of the seventeenth century by Charles Perrault (1628–1703), a retired civil servant and member of the Académie française . The tale appeared in a handwritten and illustrated manuscript two years before its 1697 publication by Barbin in a collection of eight fairy tales by Perrault called Histoires ou contes du temps passé
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Académie Française
The ACADéMIE FRANçAISE (French pronunciation: ​ ), known in English as the FRENCH ACADEMY, is the pre-eminent French council for matters pertaining to the French language . The Académie was officially established in 1635 by Cardinal Richelieu , the chief minister to King Louis XIII . Suppressed in 1793 during the French Revolution , it was restored as a division of the Institut de France in 1803 by Napoleon
Napoleon
Bonaparte . It is the oldest of the five académies of the institute. The Académie consists of forty members, known informally as les immortels (the immortals). New members are elected by the members of the Académie itself. Academicians hold office for life, but they may resign or be dismissed for misconduct
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Genre
GENRE (/ˈʒɒ̃rə/ , /ˈʒɒnrə/ or /ˈdʒɒnrə/ ; from French _genre_ , "kind" or "sort", from Latin _genus_ (stem _gener-_), Greek γένος, _génos_) is any form or type of communication in any mode (written, spoken, digital, artistic, etc.) with socially-agreed upon conventions developed over time. Genre
Genre
is most popularly known as a category of literature , music , or other forms of art or entertainment, whether written or spoken, audio or visual, based on some set of stylistic criteria, yet genres can be aesthetic, rhetorical, communicative, or functional. Genres form by conventions that change over time as new genres are invented and the use of old ones is discontinued. Often, works fit into multiple genres by way of borrowing and recombining these conventions. Stand alone texts, works, or pieces of communication may have individual styles, but genres are amalgams of these texts based on agreed upon or socially inferred conventions
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Folklore
FOLKLORE is expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the traditions common to that culture, subculture or group. These include oral traditions such as tales , proverbs and jokes . They include material culture , ranging from traditional building styles to handmade toys common to the group. Folklore also includes customary lore , the forms and rituals of celebrations such as Christmas and weddings, folk dances and initiation rites. Each one of these, either singly or in combination, is considered a folklore artifact . Just as essential as the form, folklore also encompasses the transmission of these artifacts from one region to another or from one generation to the next. For folklore is not taught in a formal school curriculum or studied in the fine arts . Instead these traditions are passed along informally from one individual to another either through verbal instruction or demonstration
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Little Red Riding Hood
"LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD", or "LITTLE RED RIDINGHOOD", also known as "LITTLE RED CAP" or simply "RED RIDING HOOD", is a European fairy tale about a young girl and a Big Bad Wolf . Its origins can be traced back to the 10th century by several European folk tales , including one from Italy
Italy
called The False Grandmother (Italian : La finta nonna), later written among others by Italo Calvino in the Italian Folktales collection; the best known versions were written by Charles Perrault and the Brothers Grimm . The story has been changed considerably in various retellings and subjected to numerous modern adaptations and readings. It is number 333 in the Aarne-Thompson classification system for folktales. Variations of the story have developed, incorporating various cultural beliefs and regional dialects into the story
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Cinderella
CINDERELLA, or THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER, (Italian : Cenerentola, French : Cendrillon, ou La petite Pantoufle de Verre, German : Aschenputtel) is a folk tale embodying a myth -element of unjust oppression/triumphant reward. Thousands of variants are known throughout the world. The title character is a young woman living in unfortunate circumstances, that are suddenly changed to remarkable fortune. The story of Rhodopis , recounted by the Greek geographer Strabo
Strabo
in around 7 BC, about a Greek slave girl who marries the king of Egypt, is considered the earliest known variant of the "Cinderella" story. The most popular version was first published by Charles Perrault in Histoires ou contes du temps passé in 1697, and later by the Brothers Grimm in their folk tale collection Grimms\' Fairy Tales
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Bluebeard
"BLUEBEARD" (French : Barbe bleue) is a French folktale , the most famous surviving version of which was written by Charles Perrault and first published by Barbin in Paris in 1697 in Histoires ou contes du temps passé . The tale tells the story of a wealthy violent man in the habit of murdering his wives and the attempts of one wife to avoid the fate of her predecessors. "The White Dove ", "The Robber Bridegroom " and "Fitcher\'s Bird " (also called "Fowler's Fowl") are tales similar to "Bluebeard"
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Brothers Grimm
The BROTHERS GRIMM (_die Brüder Grimm_ or _die Gebrüder Grimm_), Jacob (1785–1863) and Wilhelm Grimm (1786–1859), were German academics, philologists, cultural researchers, lexicographers and authors who together collected and published folklore during the 19th century. They were among the best-known storytellers of folk tales, and popularized stories such as " Cinderella " ("Aschenputtel"), "The Frog Prince " ("Der Froschkönig"), " The Goose-Girl " ("Die Gänsemagd"), " Hansel and Gretel " ("Hänsel und Gretel"), "Rapunzel ", " Rumpelstiltskin " ("Rumpelstilzchen"), " Sleeping Beauty " ("Dornröschen"), and " Snow White " ("Schneewittchen"). Their first collection of folk tales, _Children\'s and Household Tales _ (_Kinder- und Hausmärchen_), was published in 1812. The brothers spent their formative years in the German town of Hanau
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Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
PYOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY (/ˈpjoʊtər ɪˈljɪtʃ tʃaɪˈkɒfski/ ; Russian : Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский; 25 April/7 May 1840 – 25 October/6 November 1893), often anglicized as PETER ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY, was a Russian composer of the late-Romantic period, some of whose works are among the most popular music in the classical repertoire. He was the first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally, bolstered by his appearances as a guest conductor in Europe and the United States. Tchaikovsky was honored in 1884, by Emperor Alexander III , and awarded a lifetime pension. Although musically precocious, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant . There was scant opportunity for a musical career in Russia at that time and no system of public music education. When an opportunity for such an education arose, he entered the nascent Saint Petersburg Conservatory , from which he graduated in 1865
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The Sleeping Beauty (ballet)
THE SLEEPING BEAUTY (Russian : Спящая красавица / Spyashchaya krasavitsa) is a ballet in a prologue and three acts, first performed in 1890. The music was composed by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (his opus 66). The score was completed in 1889, and is the second of his three ballets. The original scenario was conceived by Ivan Vsevolozhsky
Ivan Vsevolozhsky
, and is based on Charles Perrault\'s La Belle au bois dormant . The choreographer of the original production was Marius Petipa . The premiere performance took place at the Mariinsky Theatre
Mariinsky Theatre
in St. Petersburg on January 15, 1890. The work has become one of the classical repertoire's most famous ballets
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