HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Charles Frederick, Grand Duke Of Baden
Charles Frederick (22 November 1728 – 10 June 1811[1]) was Margrave, Elector and later Grand Duke of Baden (initially only Margrave of Baden-Durlach) from 1738 until his death.Contents1 Biography 2 Marriages and children 3 Ancestry 4 References 5 Further readingBiography[edit] Born at Karlsruhe, he was the son of Hereditary Prince Frederick of Baden-Durlach
Baden-Durlach
and Amalia of Nassau-Dietz
Amalia of Nassau-Dietz
(13 October 1710 – 17 September 1777), the daughter of Johan Willem Friso of Nassau-Dietz. He succeeded his grandfather as Margrave of Baden-Durlach
Baden-Durlach
in 1738 and ruled personally from 1746 until 1771, when he inherited Baden-Baden from the Bernhard Line. Upon inheriting the latter margraviate, the original land of Baden was reunited
[...More...]

"Charles Frederick, Grand Duke Of Baden" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Grand Duke Of Baden
Grand
Grand
may refer to:Contents1 Places 2 People 3 Arts, entertainment, and media3.1 Music 3.2 Other arts, entertainment, and media4 Brands and enterprises 5 Other uses 6 See alsoPlaces[edit]Grand, Vosges, village and commune in France with Gallo-Roman amphitheatre Grand
Grand
Geyser, Upper Geyser Basin of Yellowstone Le Grand, California, census-designated placePeople[edit] Grand
Grand
(surname) Grand
Grand
L
[...More...]

"Grand Duke Of Baden" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ortenau
The Ortenau, originally called Mortenau, is a historic region in the present-day German state of Baden-Württemberg. It is located on the right bank of the river Rhine, stretching from the Upper Rhine
Upper Rhine
Plain to the foothill zone of the Black Forest. In the south, it borders on the Breisgau
Breisgau
region, covering approximately the same area as the Ortenaukreis, a present-day administrative district with its centre at Offenburg. The region was first mentioned as Mordunouva in a 763 deed. Then an early medieval county (Gau) in the German stem duchy of Swabia, it received its name from a fortification near Ortenberg at the site of later Ortenberg Castle. In 1007, King Henry II enfeoffed the Bishops of Bamberg with the Ortenau
Ortenau
estates. However, as the bishops were not able to control their remote Swabian lands themselves, they entrusted the rule to the local noble House of Zähringen
[...More...]

"Ortenau" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Serfdom
Serfdom
Serfdom
is the status of many peasants under feudalism, specifically relating to manorialism. It was a condition of bondage, which developed primarily during the High Middle Ages
High Middle Ages
in Europe and lasted in some countries until the mid-19th century. Serfs who occupied a plot of land were required to work for the lord of the manor who owned that land. In return they were entitled to protection, justice, and the right to cultivate certain fields within the manor to maintain their own subsistence. Serfs were often required not only to work on the lord's fields, but also in his mines and forests and to labor to maintain roads
[...More...]

"Serfdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sigismund Von Reitzenstein
Freiherr Sigismund Karl Johann von Reitzenstein (3 February 1766 in Nemmersdorf - 5 March 1847 in Karlsruhe) was the first minister of state of the Grand Duchy of Baden.[1] From 1781, Reitzenstein studied law in Göttingen and Erlangen before getting a position in the Principality of Bayreuth. In 1788 he took service in the Margravate of Baden in Karlsruhe. He advanced quickly, first taking part in the secret council of the court and then advancing to chamberlain in 1790 and bailif in Lörrach in 1792.[1] Reitzenstein did much to bring Baden closer to its powerful neighbor France. He struck a separate peace with France in Basel in August 1796. He then worked in Paris from 1797 to 1803 as ambassador of Baden. During this period, not only did Baden become an Electorate, Reitzenstein oversaw the quadrupling of the size of the duchy. Reitzenstein resigned his post in 1803.[1] Reitzenstein was named cabinet minister twice in 1805/1806 and 1809/1810
[...More...]

"Sigismund Von Reitzenstein" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bishopric Of Constance
The Bishopric of Constance, or Prince-Bishopric
Prince-Bishopric
of Constance, (German: Hochstift Konstanz, Fürstbistum Konstanz) was a Prince-Bishopric
Prince-Bishopric
and Imperial Estate of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
from the mid–12th century until its secularisation in 1802–1803
[...More...]

"Bishopric Of Constance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bishopric Of Basel
The Prince-Bishopric
Prince-Bishopric
of Basel
Basel
(German: Fürstbistum Basel) was an ecclesiastical principality within the Holy Roman Empire, ruled from 1032 by Prince-Bishops with their seat at Basel, and from 1528 until 1792 at Porrentruy, and thereafter at Schliengen. The final dissolution of the state occurred in 1803 as part of the German Mediatisation. The Prince-Bishopric
Prince-Bishopric
comprised territories now in the Swiss cantons of Basel-Landschaft, Jura, Solothurn and Bern, besides minor territories in nearby portions of southern Germany and eastern France. The city of Basel
Basel
ceased to be part of the Prince-Bishopric
Prince-Bishopric
after it joined the Swiss Confederacy in 1501.Contents1 History 2 Territories 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The city of Basel
Basel
became episcopal seat in ca
[...More...]

"Bishopric Of Basel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Bishopric Of Strassburg
The Prince-Bishopric of Strassburg (German: Fürstbistum Straßburg) was an ecclesiastical principality of the Holy Roman Empire from the 13th century until 1803. During the late 17th century, most of its territory was annexed by France; this consisted of the areas on the left bank of the Rhine, around the towns of Saverne, Molsheim, Benfeld, Dachstein, Dambach, Dossenheim-Kochersberg, Erstein, Kästenbolz, Rhinau, and the Mundat (consisting of Rouffach, Soultz, and Eguisheim). The annexations were recognized by the Holy Roman Empire in the Treaty of Ryswick of 1697. Only the part of the state that was to the right of the Rhine remained; it consisted of areas around the towns of Oberkirch, Ettenheim, and Oppenau
[...More...]

"Bishopric Of Strassburg" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bishopric Of Speyer
The Bishopric of Speyer, or Prince-Bishopric
Prince-Bishopric
of Speyer
Speyer
(formerly known as Spires in English), was an ecclesiastical principality in what are today the German states of Rhineland-Palatinate
Rhineland-Palatinate
and Baden-Württemberg. It was secularized in 1803. The prince-bishop resided in Speyer, a Free Imperial City, until the 14th century when he moved his residence to Uddenheim (Philippsburg), then in 1723 to Bruchsal, in large part due to the tense relationship between successive prince-bishops and the civic authorities of the Free City, officially Protestant since the Reformation
[...More...]

"Bishopric Of Speyer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Breisgau
Breisgau
Breisgau
is an area in southwest Germany
Germany
between the Rhine
Rhine
River and the foothills of the Black Forest. Part of the state of Baden-Württemberg, it centers on the city of Freiburg
Freiburg
im Breisgau. The district Breisgau-Hochschwarzwald, which partly consists of the Breisgau, is named after the Black Forest
Black Forest
area
[...More...]

"Breisgau" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Confederation Of The Rhine
The Confederation
Confederation
of the Rhine (German: Rheinbund; French: officially États confédérés du Rhin ["Confederated States of the Rhine"], but in practice Confédération du Rhin) was a confederation of client states of the First French Empire. It was formed initially from 16 German states by Napoleon
Napoleon
after he defeated Austria
Austria
and Russia at the Battle of Austerlitz. The Treaty of Pressburg, in effect, led to the creation of the Confederation
Confederation
of the Rhine. It lasted from 1806 to 1813.[1] The members of the confederation were German princes (Fürsten) from the Holy Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Confederation Of The Rhine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baden-Baden
Baden-Baden
Baden-Baden
is a spa town, located in the state of Baden-Württemberg in southwestern Germany
[...More...]

"Baden-Baden" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Friedrich Weinbrenner
Friedrich Weinbrenner
Friedrich Weinbrenner
(24 November 1766 – 1 March 1826) was a German architect and city planner admired for his mastery of classical style.Contents1 Birth and education 2 Career 3 Buildings in Karlsruhe 4 References 5 External linksBirth and education[edit] Weinbrenner was born in Karlsruhe, and began his career apprenticed to his father, a carpenter. He worked as a builder in Zürich
Zürich
and Lausanne
Lausanne
starting from 1788. He arrived to Vienna
Vienna
in 1790 and began his study of architecture, largely self-taught. In 1790-91 he studied at the Bauakademie of Vienna
Vienna
and Dresden, then, in 1791-92, spent several months in Berlin
Berlin
where he was exposed to Palladian architecture
[...More...]

"Friedrich Weinbrenner" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Napoleonic Era
The Napoleonic era
Napoleonic era
is a period in the history of France
France
and Europe. It is generally classified as including the fourth and final stage of the French Revolution, the first being the National Assembly, the second being the Legislative Assembly, and the third being the Directory. The Napoleonic era
Napoleonic era
begins roughly with Napoleon
Napoleon
Bonaparte's coup d'état, overthrowing the Directory, establishing the French Consulate, and ends during the Hundred Days
Hundred Days
and his defeat at the Battle of Waterloo (9 November 1799 – 28 June 1815). The Congress of Vienna
Congress of Vienna
soon set out to restore Europe to pre- French Revolution
French Revolution
days. Napoleon brought political stability to a land torn by revolution and war
[...More...]

"Napoleonic Era" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lt. Col.
Lieutenant
Lieutenant
colonel is a rank of commissioned officer in the armies, most marine forces and some air forces of the world, above a major and below a colonel
[...More...]

"Lt. Col." on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

HRH
Royal Highness (abbreviated HRH for His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness) is a style used to address or refer to some members of royal families, usually princes and princesses but not normally monarchs or their spouses of equal rank to them (that is, not kings, queens regnant, or queens consort), who are usually styled Majesty. When used as a direct form of address, spoken or written, it takes the form "Your Royal Highness". When used as a third-person reference, it is gender-specific (His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness, both abbreviated HRH) and, in plural, Their Royal Highnesses (TRH).Contents1 Origin 2 African usage 3 Holy Roman Empire 4 Kingdom of the Netherlands 5 United Kingdom 6 Denmark 7 Sweden 8 Saudi Arabia 9 See also 10 ReferencesOrigin[edit] By the 17th century, all local rulers in Italy adopted the style Highness, that was once used by kings and emperors only
[...More...]

"HRH" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.