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Charismatic Movement
The Charismatic Movement
Charismatic Movement
is the international trend of historically mainstream Christian congregations adopting beliefs and practices similar to Pentecostalism. Fundamental to the movement is the use of spiritual gifts (charismata). Among Protestants, the movement began around 1960. Among Roman Catholics, it originated around 1967.Contents1 History 2 Beliefs 3 Denominations influenced3.1 Anglicanism 3.2 Evangelicalism 3.3 Lutheranism 3.4 Methodism 3.5 Calvinism 3.6 Adventism 3.7 Roman Catholicism 3.8 Eastern Orthodoxy4 Theologians and scholars 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit] Pentecostalism
Pentecostalism
began in the early twentieth century. Its doctrinal distinctive involved a dramatic encounter with God termed baptism with the Holy Spirit
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Jesus
Jesus[e] (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
and Jesus
Jesus
Christ,[f] was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.[12] He is the central figure of Christianity
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Jesus In Christianity
In Christianity, Jesus
Jesus
is believed to be the Messiah
Messiah
(Christ) and through his crucifixion and resurrection, humans can be reconciled to God and thereby are offered salvation and the promise of eternal life.[2] These teachings emphasize that as the willing Lamb of God, Jesus
Jesus
chose to suffer on the cross at Calvary
Calvary
as a sign of his full obedience to the will of God the Father, as an "agent and servant of God".[3][4] The choice Jesus
Jesus
made thus counter-positions him as a new man of morality and obedience, in contrast to Adam's disobedience.[5] Christians believe that Jesus
Jesus
was both human and divine—the Son of God
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Ministry Of Jesus
In the Christian gospels, the ministry of Jesus
Jesus
begins with his baptism in the countryside of Roman Judea
Roman Judea
and Transjordan, near the river Jordan, and ends in Jerusalem, following the
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Liturgical Year
The liturgical year, also known as the church year or Christian year, as well as the kalendar,[1] consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in Christian churches that determines when feast days, including celebrations of saints, are to be observed, and which portions of Scripture
Scripture
are to be read either in an annual cycle or in a cycle of several years. Distinct liturgical colours may appear in connection with different seasons of the liturgical year
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Mary, Mother Of Jesus
Mary (Greek: Μαρία, translit. María; Aramaic: ܡܪܝܡ‎, translit. Mariam; Hebrew: מִרְיָם‎, translit. Miriam; Coptic: Ⲙⲁⲣⲓⲁ; Arabic: مريم‎, translit. Maryam), also known by various titles, styles and honorifics, was a 1st-century BC Galilean Jewish[2] woman of Nazareth, and the mother of Jesus, according to the New Testament[3][4][5][6] and the Quran.[7][8] The gospels of Matthew and Luke in the New Testament
New Testament
and the Quran describe Mary as a virgin (Greek: παρθένος, translit. parthénos)[9] and many[which?] Christians believe that she conceived her son while a virgin by the Holy Spirit
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Christology
Christology
Christology
(from Greek Χριστός Khristós and -λογία, -logia) is the field of study within Christian theology
Christian theology
which is primarily concerned with the ontology and person of Jesus
Jesus
as recorded in the canonical Gospels and the epistles of the New Testament.[2][3][4] Primary considerations include the ontology and person of Jesus
Jesus
in conjunction with His relationship with that of God the Father. As such, Christology
Christology
is concerned with the details of Jesus' ministry, his acts and teachings, to arrive at a clearer understanding of who he is in his person, and his role in salvation.[5] The views of Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle
provided a major component of the Christology
Christology
of the Apostolic Age
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Christian Mission
A Christian mission
Christian mission
is an organized effort to spread Christianity.[1] Missions often involve sending individuals and groups, called missionaries, across boundaries, most commonly geographical boundaries, for the purpose of proselytism (conversion to Christianity, or from one Christian tradition to another). This involves evangelism (preaching a set of beliefs for the purpose of conversion), and humanitarian work, especially among the poor and disadvantaged. There are a few different kinds of mission trips: short-term, long-term, relational and ones meant simply for helping people in need. Some might choose to dedicate their whole lives to missions as well. Missionaries have the authority to preach the Christian faith (and sometimes to administer sacraments), and provide humanitarian work to improve economic development, literacy, education, health care, and orphanages
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Patriology
In Christian
Christian
theology, term Patriology
Patriology
refers to the study of the God the Father. The word Patriology
Patriology
comes from two Greek words: πατέρας (pateras, father) and λογος (logos, teaching about). As a theological discipline, Patriology
Patriology
is closely connected to Christology
Christology
(study of Christ
Christ
as God the Son) and Pneumatology (study of Holy Ghost as God the Spirit). The term Patriology
Patriology
should not be confused with similar term Patrology that involves the study of teachings of the Church Fathers. There are three basic forms of the name of God the Father
God the Father
in the New Testament: Theos (θεός the Greek woed for God), Kyrios
Kyrios
(i.e. Lord in Greek) and Pateras (πατέρας i.e
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Pneumatology (Christianity)
Pneumatology in Christianity
Christianity
refers to a particular discipline within Christian theology
Christian theology
that focuses on the study of the Holy Spirit. The term is essentially derived from the Greek word Pneuma (πνεῦμα), which designates "breath" or "spirit" and metaphorically describes a non-material being or influence. The English term pneumatology comes from two Greek words: πνευμα (pneuma, spirit) and λογος (logos, teaching about)
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Salvation In Christianity
Salvation
Salvation
in Christianity, or deliverance, is the saving of the soul from sin and its consequences.[1] Variant views on salvation are among the main fault lines dividing the various Christian denominations, being a point of disagreement between Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism
Roman Catholicism
and Protestantism, as well as within Protestantism, notably in the Calvinist–Arminian debate
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Christian Tradition
Christian tradition is a collection of traditions consisting of practices or beliefs associated with Christianity. These ecclesiastical traditions have more or less authority based on the nature of the practices or beliefs and on the group in question. Many churches have traditional practices, such as particular patterns of worship or rites, that developed over time. Deviations from such patterns are sometimes considered unacceptable or heretical. Similarly, traditions can be stories or history that are or were widely accepted without being part of Christian doctrine, e.g., the crucifixion of Saint Peter
Saint Peter
or the evangelistic activity of Thomas the Apostle in India, which are widely believed to have happened but are not recorded in scripture
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Church Fathers
The Church Fathers, Early Church
Early Church
Fathers, Christian Fathers, or Fathers of the Church are ancient and generally influential Christian theologians, some of whom were eminent teachers and great bishops. The term is used of writers or teachers of the Church not necessarily ordained[1] and not necessarily "saints"— Origen
Origen
Adamantius and Tertullian
Tertullian
are often considered Church Fathers, but are not saints, owing to their views later being deemed heretical.[2] Most Church Fathers are honored as saints in the Catholic
Catholic
Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, the Church of the East, Anglicanism
Anglicanism
and Lutheranism, as well as other churches and groups
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Apostles
In Christian theology
Christian theology
and ecclesiology, the apostles (Greek: ἀπόστολος, translit. apóstolos, lit. 'one who is sent away'), particularly the Twelve Apostles
Twelve Apostles
(also known as the Twelve Disciples or simply the Twelve), were the primary disciples of Jesus, the central figure in Christianity. During the life and ministry of Jesus
Jesus
in the 1st century AD, the apostles were his closest followers and became the primary teachers of the gospel message of Jesus. The word disciple is sometimes used interchangeably with apostle; for instance, the Gospel of John
Gospel of John
makes no distinction between the two terms[citation needed]. In modern usage, prominent missionaries are often called apostles, a practice which stems from the Latin
Latin
equivalent of apostle, i.e. missio, the source of the English word missionary
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Saint Peter
Saint
Saint
Peter (Syriac/Aramaic: ܫܸܡܥܘܿܢ ܟܹ݁ܐܦ݂ܵܐ, Shemayon Keppa, Hebrew: שמעון בר יונה‎ Shim'on bar Yona, Greek: Πέτρος Petros, Coptic: ⲡⲉⲧⲣⲟⲥ, translit. Petros, Latin: Petrus; r. AD 30;[1] d. between AD 64 and 68[2]), also known as Simon Peter, Simeon, or Simon ( pronunciation (help·info)), according to the New Testament, was one of the Twelve Apostles
Twelve Apostles
of Jesus
Jesus
Christ, leaders of the early Christian Great Church. Pope
Pope
Gregory I called him repeatedly the "Prince of the Apostles".[3] According to Catholic teaching, Jesus promised Peter in the "Rock of My Church" dialogue in Matthew 16:18 a special position in the Church
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Holy Spirit In Christianity
For the majority of Christian denominations, the Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit
or Holy Ghost is the third person (hypostasis) of the Trinity: the Triune God manifested as God the Father, God the Son, and Holy Spirit; each person itself being God.[2][3][4] Some Christian theologians identify the Holy Spirit
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