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Chamber Of Deputies (France)
Chamber of Deputies (French: la Chambre des députés) was the name given to several parliamentary bodies in France
France
in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries:1814–1848 during the Bourbon Restoration
Bourbon Restoration
and the July Monarchy, the Chamber of Deputies was the Lower chamber
Lower chamber
of the French Parliament, elected by census suffrage. 1875–1940 during the French Third Republic, the Chamber of Deputies was the legislative assembly of the French Parliament, elected by universal suffrage
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Chamber Of Deputies
The chamber of deputies is the legislative body such as the lower house of a bicameral legislature, or also a unicameral legislature.Contents1 Description 2 Lower house
Lower house
in bicameral legislature 3 Unicameral
Unicameral
legislatures 4 Defunct chambers of deputies 5 See also 6 ReferencesDescription[edit] Historically, "French Chamber of Deputies" was the lower house of the French Parliament
French Parliament
during the Bourbon Restoration, the July Monarchy, and the French Third Republic; the name is still informally used for the National Assembly under the nation's current Fifth Republic. The term "chamber of deputies" — although it was used as the name of the lower house of parliament in Burma, a former British colony — is not widely used by English-speaking countries, the more popular equivalent being "House of Representatives"
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First French Empire
French Revolutionary Wars •  Constitution adopted 18 May 1804 •  Coronation of Napoleon
Napoleon
I 2 December 1804 •  Treaty of Tilsit 7 July 1807 •  Invasion of Russia 24 June 1812 •  Treaty of Fontainebleau 11 April 1814 •  Hundred Days 20 March – 7 July 1815Area •  1812 [4] 860,000 km2 (330,000 sq mi)Population
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Politics Of France
The politics of France
France
take place with the framework of a semi-presidential system determined by the French Constitution of the French Fifth Republic. The nation declares itself to be an "indivisible, secular, democratic, and social Republic".[1] The constitution provides for a separation of powers and proclaims France's "attachment to the Rights of Man and the principles of national sovereignty as defined by the Declaration of 1789." The political system of France
France
consists of an executive branch, a legislative branch, and a judicial branch. Executive power is exercised by the President of the Republic
Republic
and the Government. The Government consists of the Prime Minister and ministers. The Prime Minister is appointed by the President, and is responsible to Parliament
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History Of France
The first written records for the history of France
France
appear in the Iron Age. What is now France
France
made up the bulk of the region known to the Romans as Gaul. Roman writers noted the presence of three main ethno-linguistic groups in the area: the Gauls, the Aquitani, and the Belgae. The Gauls, the largest and best attested group, were Celtic people speaking what is known as the Gaulish language. Over the course of the 1st millennium BC the Greeks, Romans and Carthaginians established colonies on the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
coast and the offshore islands
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Cabinet Of France
The Government of the French Republic
French Republic
(French: Gouvernement de la République française) exercises executive power in France. It is composed of a prime minister, who is the head of government, and both junior and senior ministers.[1] Senior ministers are titled as Ministers (French: Ministres), whereas junior ministers are titled as Secretaries of State (French: Secrétaires d'État). A smaller and more powerful executive body, called the Council of Ministers (French: Conseil des ministres), is composed only of the senior ministers, though some Secretaries of State may attend Council meetings
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Constitution Of France
The current Constitution
Constitution
of France
France
was adopted on 4 October 1958. It is typically called the Constitution
Constitution
of the Fifth Republic, and replaced that of the Fourth Republic dating from 1946. Charles de Gaulle was the main driving force in introducing the new constitution and inaugurating the Fifth Republic, while the text was drafted by Michel Debré
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Charter Of 1830
The Charter of 1830
Charter of 1830
(French: Charte de 1830) instigated the July Monarchy in France. It was considered a compromise between constitutionalists and republicans.Contents1 History 2 Constitutional provisions 3 References 4 See alsoHistory[edit] After three days of protests in July 1830 – the July Revolution, also called the "Three Glorious Days" (les trois glorieuses) – by the merchant bourgeoisie, who were outraged to be ousted from the limited voters list by the July Ordinances, Charles X of France
France
was forced to abdicate. Charles X's chosen successor was his young grandson, Henri, comte de Chambord (1820–1883), but Henri never ascended to the throne
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Chambre Introuvable
The Chambre introuvable
Chambre introuvable
(French: Unobtainable Chamber) was the first Chamber of Deputies elected after the Second Bourbon Restoration
Bourbon Restoration
in 1815. It was dominated by Ultra-royalists
Ultra-royalists
who completely refused to accept the results of the French Revolution. The name was coined by King Louis XVIII of France. The elections, held on 14 August 1815 under census suffrage and under the impact of the "White Terror", produced a heavy Ultra-royalist majority: 350 of the 402 members were Ultra-royalists. The "Unobtainable Chamber", which was first assembled on 7 October 1815, was characterized by its zeal in favour of the aristocracy and the clergy and aimed at reestablishing the Ancien Régime
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Ultra-royalists
An Ultra-royalist
Ultra-royalist
(French: Ultraroyaliste, collectively Ultras) was a French political label used from 1815 to 1830 under the Bourbon Restoration
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Waterloo Campaign
Coalition victory, Second Treaty of ParisEnd of Napoleonic Wars Second exile of Napoleon Bonaparte
Napoleon Bonaparte
and second Bourbon Restoration Beginning of the Concert of EuropeBelligerents French EmpireSeventh Coalition:  United Kingdom Netherlands Hanover  Nassau Brunswick PrussiaCommanders and leaders
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Chambre Des Représentants De France
The Chamber of Representatives (French: Chambre des représentants) was the popularly elected lower body of the French Parliament
French Parliament
set up under the Charter of 1815. The body had 629 members who were to serve five-year terms.[1] The upper body was the Chamber of Peers. Jean Denis, comte Lanjuinais served as president of this body while it existed.[2] The Chamber of Representatives was short-lived
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Charter Of 1815
The Charter of 1815, signed on April 22, 1815, was the French constitution prepared by Benjamin Constant
Benjamin Constant
at the request of Napoleon I when he returned from exile on Elba. More correctly known as the "Additional Act to the Constitutions of the Empire" the document extensively amended (in fact virtually replacing) the previous Napoleonic Constitutions ( Constitution
Constitution
of the Year VIII, Constitution of the Year X and Constitution
Constitution
of the Year XII). The Additional Act reframed the Napoleonic constitution into something more along the lines of the Bourbon Restoration
Bourbon Restoration
Charter of 1814
Charter of 1814
of Louis XVIII, while otherwise ignoring the Bourbon charter's existence
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Napoleon I
Napoléon Bonaparte (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a French statesman and military leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution and led several successful campaigns during the French Revolutionary Wars. As Napoleon, he was Emperor of the French
Emperor of the French
from 1804 until 1814, and again briefly in 1815 during the Hundred Days. Napoleon
Napoleon
dominated European and global affairs for more than a decade while leading France
France
against a series of coalitions in the Napoleonic Wars. He won most of these wars and the vast majority of his battles, building a large empire that ruled over continental Europe before its final collapse in 1815. He is considered one of the greatest commanders in history, and his wars and campaigns are studied at military schools worldwide
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Hundred Days
Coalition victory, Second Treaty of ParisEnd of Napoleonic Wars Second exile of Napoleon
Napoleon
and second Bourbon Restoration Beginning of the Concert of EuropeBelligerents United Kingdom  Prussia  Austrian Empire  Russian Empire  Kingdom of Hanover  Nassau  Duchy of Brunswick  Sweden  United Kingdom of the Netherlands  Spain  Portugal  Sardinia  Kingdom of Sicily Tuscany Switzerland French Kingdom France NaplesCommanders and leaders
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