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Chaim Potok
Chaim Potok
Chaim Potok
(February 17, 1929 – July 23, 2002) was an American Jewish
Jewish
author and rabbi. Potok is most famous for his first book The Chosen (1967), which was listed on The New York Times’ best seller list for 39 weeks and sold more than 3,400,000 copies.[1][2]Contents1 Biography 2 Literary career 3 Literary influences 4 Artistic career 5 Legacy 6 Published works 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksBiography[edit] Herman Harold Potok was born in the Bronx, New York, to Benjamin Max (died 1958) and Mollie (née Friedman) Potok (died 1985), Jewish immigrants from Poland. He was the oldest of four children, all of whom either became or married rabbis. His Hebrew
Hebrew
name was Chaim Tzvi (חיים צבי). He received an Orthodox Jewish
Jewish
education
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Bronx, New York
The Bronx
The Bronx
(/brɒŋks/) is the northernmost of the five boroughs of New York City within the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York. It is south of Westchester County; north and east of Manhattan, across the Harlem River; and north of Queens, across the East River. Since 1914, the borough has had the same boundaries as Bronx County, the third-most densely populated county in the United States.[2] The Bronx
The Bronx
has a land area of 42 square miles (109 km2) and a population of 1,471,160 in 2017.[1] Of the five boroughs, it has the fourth-largest area, fourth-highest population, and third-highest population density.[2] It is the only borough predominantly on the U.S. mainland. The Bronx
The Bronx
is divided by the Bronx River
Bronx River
into a hillier section in the west, and a flatter eastern section
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Cameo Role
A cameo role or cameo appearance (/ˈkæmioʊ/; often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance or voice part of a known person in a work of the performing arts, typically unnamed or appearing as themselves. These roles are generally small, many of them non-speaking ones, and are commonly either appearances in a work in which they hold some special significance (such as actors from an original movie appearing in its remake) or renowned people making uncredited appearances. Short appearances by celebrities, film directors, politicians, athletes, or musicians are common. A crew member of the movie or show playing a minor role can be referred to as a cameo as well, such as Alfred Hitchcock's frequently performed cameos.Contents1 Concept1.1 Film directors 1.2 Actors and writers 1.3 Real-life people2 See also 3 ReferencesConcept[edit] Originally "cameo role" meant "a small character part that stands out from the other minor parts"
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University Of Pennsylvania
The University
University
of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
(commonly known as Penn or UPenn) is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university located in the University
University
City section of Philadelphia. Incorporated as The Trustees of the University
University
of Pennsylvania, Penn is one of 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities
Association of American Universities
and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution.[5] Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founder, advocated an educational program that focused as much on practical education for commerce and public service as on the classics and theology, though his proposed curriculum was never adopted
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Israel
Coordinates: 31°N 35°E / 31°N 35°E / 31; 35State of Israelמְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל (Hebrew) دَوْلَة إِسْرَائِيل (Arabic)FlagEmblemAnthem: "Hatikvah" (Hebrew for "The Hope")(pre-) 1967 border (Green Line)Capital and largest city Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(limited recognition)[fn 1] 31°47′N 35°13′E / 31.783°N 35.217°E / 31.783; 35.217Official languagesHebrew ArabicEthnic groups (2017)74.7% Jewish 20.8% Arab 4.5% other[5]Religion (2016
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Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(/dʒəˈruːsələm/; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם‬  Yerushaláyim; Arabic: القُدس‎  al-Quds)[note 2] is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea. It is one of the oldest cities in the world, and is considered holy to the three major Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity
Christianity
and Islam
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National Book Award
The National Book Awards are a set of annual U.S. literary awards.[1][2] At the final National Book Awards Ceremony every November, the National Book Foundation presents the National Book Awards and two lifetime achievement awards to authors. The National Book Awards were established in 1936 by the American Booksellers Association,[3][4] abandoned during World War II, and re-established by three book industry organizations in 1950. Non-U.S. authors and publishers were eligible for the pre-war awards. Now they are presented to U.S
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Athenaeum Literary Award
The Athenaeum of Philadelphia, located at 219 S. 6th Street between St. James Place and Locust Street in the Society Hill
Society Hill
neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is a special collections library and museum founded in 1814 to collect materials "connected with the history and antiquities of America, and the useful arts, and generally to disseminate useful knowledge" for public benefit.[3] The Athenaeum's collections include architecture and interior design history, particularly for the period 1800 to 1945. The institution focuses on the history of American architecture and building technology, and houses architectural archives of 180,000 drawings, over 350,000 photographs, and manuscript holdings of about 1,000 American architects
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Montreal World Film Festival
The Montreal
Montreal
World Film Festival (WFF; French: le Festival des Films du Monde; alternative official name Montreal
Montreal
International Film Festival, not commonly used), founded in 1977, is one of Canada's oldest international film festivals and the only competitive film festival in North America accredited by the FIAPF (although the Toronto International Film Festival
Toronto International Film Festival
is North America's only accredited non-competitive festival)
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Montreal, Canada
Montreal
Montreal
(/ˌmʌntriˈɒl/ ( listen);[14] French: [mɔ̃ʁeal] ( listen); officially Montréal) is the most populous municipality in the Canadian province of Quebec and the second-most populous municipality in Canada
Canada
as a whole. Originally called Ville-Marie, or "City of Mary",[15] it is named after Mount Royal,[16] the triple-peaked hill in the heart of the city. The city is centred on the Island of Montreal, which took its name from the same source as the city,[17][18] and a few much smaller peripheral islands, the largest of which is Île Bizard
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Rod Steiger
Rodney Stephen Steiger (April 14, 1925 – July 9, 2002) was an American actor, noted for his portrayal of offbeat, often volatile and crazed characters. Cited as "one of Hollywood's most charismatic and dynamic stars",[1] he is closely associated with the art of method acting, embodying the characters he played, which at times led to clashes with directors and co-stars. He starred as Marlon Brando's mobster brother Charlie in On the Waterfront
On the Waterfront
(1954), the title character Sol Nazerman in The Pawnbroker (1964), and as police chief Bill Gillespie opposite Sidney Poitier
Sidney Poitier
in the film In the Heat of the Night (1967) which won him the Academy Award for Best Actor. Steiger was born in Westhampton, New York, the son of a vaudevillian. He had a difficult childhood, with an alcoholic mother from whom he ran away at the age of 16
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Anti-Semitism
Antisemitism
Antisemitism
(also spelled anti-Semitism or anti-semitism) is hostility to, prejudice, or discrimination against Jews.[1][2][3] A person who holds such positions is called an antisemite. Antisemitism is generally considered to be a form of racism.[4][5] Antisemitism
Antisemitism
may be manifested in many ways, ranging from expressions of hatred of or discrimination against individual Jews
Jews
to organized pogroms by mobs, state police, or even military attacks on entire Jewish communities. Although the term did not come into common usage until the 19th century, it is now also applied to historic anti-Jewish incidents
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Maximilian Schell
Maximilian Schell
Maximilian Schell
(8 December 1930 – 1 February 2014) was an Austrian-born Swiss[1] film and stage actor, who also wrote, directed and produced some of his own films. He won the Academy Award for Best Actor for the 1961 American film Judgment at Nuremberg, his second acting role in Hollywood. Born in Austria, his parents were involved in the arts and he grew up surrounded by acting and literature. While he was a child, his family fled to Switzerland
Switzerland
in 1938 when Austria was annexed by Nazi Germany, and they settled in Zurich. After World War II ended, Schell took up acting or directing full-time. He appeared in numerous German films, often anti-war, before moving on to Hollywood. Schell was top billed in a number of Nazi-era themed films, as he could speak both English and German
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Off-Broadway
An Off- Broadway theatre
Broadway theatre
is a professional venue in New York City with a seating capacity between 100 and 499
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Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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James Joyce
James Augustine[1] Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist, short story writer, poet, teacher, and literary critic. He contributed to the modernist avant-garde and is regarded as one of the most influential and important authors of the 20th century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses (1922), a landmark work in which the episodes of Homer's Odyssey
Odyssey
are paralleled in a variety of literary styles, most famously stream of consciousness. Other well-known works are the short-story collection Dubliners
Dubliners
(1914), and the novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) and Finnegans Wake
Finnegans Wake
(1939). His other writings include three books of poetry, a play, his published letters and occasional journalism. Joyce was born in Dublin
Dublin
into a middle-class family
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