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Chaim Ibn Attar
Ḥayyim ben Moshe ibn Attar also known as the Or ha-Ḥayyim after his popular commentary on the Pentateuch, was a Talmudist and kabbalist; born at Meknes, Morocco, in 1696; died in Jerusalem, Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
on 7 July 1743. He was one of the most prominent rabbis in Morocco. In 1733 he decided to leave his native country and settle in the Land of Israel, then under the Ottoman Empire. En route he was detained in Livorno
Livorno
by the rich members of the Jewish community who established a yeshiva for him. Many of his pupils later became prominent and furnished him with funds to print his Or ha-Ḥayyim. (light of life) He was received with great honor wherever he traveled. This was due to his extensive knowledge, keen intellect and extraordinary piety
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Meknes
Meknes
Meknes
(Arabic: مكناس‎, translit. məknas; Berber languages: ⴰⵎⴽⵏⴰⵙ, translit. amknas; French: Meknès) is one of the four Imperial cities of Morocco, located in northern central Morocco
Morocco
and the sixth largest city by population in the kingdom. Founded in the 11th century by the Almoravids
Almoravids
as a military settlement, Meknes
Meknes
became capital of Morocco
Morocco
under the reign of Sultan Moulay Ismaïl (1672–1727), son of the founder of the Alaouite dynasty
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Luncz
Abraham Moses Luncz
Abraham Moses Luncz
(December 9, 1854–1918) (Hebrew: אברהם לונץ‬) was a Russian scholar and editor born at Kovno, Russia. At age 14 he came to Jerusalem.[1] Luncz, who suffered from early blindness, founded, in conjunction with Dr. Koisewski, an institution for the blind at Jerusalem. In the exploration of the Holy Land, Luncz has rendered great services from the historical, geographical, and physical standpoints, through his guide-books for Palestine, his Palestine annuals, and his Jerusalem
Jerusalem
almanac:Netibot Ẓiyyon we-Yerushalayim: Topography
Topography
of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
and Its Surroundings (vol
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Book Of Proverbs
The Book
Book
of Proverbs (Hebrew: מִשְלֵי, Míshlê (Shlomoh), "Proverbs (of Solomon)") is the second book of the third section (called Writings) of the Hebrew <
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Book Of Joshua
The Book
Book
of Joshua
Joshua
(Hebrew: ספר יהושע‎ Sefer Yĕhôshúa) is the sixth book in the
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Book Of Judges
The Book
Book
of Judges (Hebrew: Sefer Shoftim ספר שופטים) is the seventh book of the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
and the Christian Bible
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Book Of Samuel
The Books of Samuel,[a] 1 Samuel
Samuel
and 2 Samuel, form part of the narrative history of Israel in the Nevi'im
Nevi'im
or "prophets" section of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, and are considered by many biblical scholars to belong to the Deuteronomistic history, a series of books (Joshua, Judges, Samuel
Samuel
and Kings) that constitute a theological history of the Israelites
Israelites
and aim to explain God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets.[1] According to Jewish tradition, the book was written by Samuel, with additions by the prophets Gad and Nathan;[2] modern scholarly thinking is that the entire Deuteronomistic history was composed in the period c. 630–540 BC by combining a number of independent texts of various ages.[3][4] Samuel
Samuel
begins with the prophet Samuel's birth[5] and God's call to him as a boy
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Isaiah
Isaiah
Isaiah
was the 8th-century BC Jewish prophet for whom the Book of Isaiah
Isaiah
is named.[3][4] Within the text of the Book of Isaiah, Isaiah
Isaiah
himself is referred to as "the prophet",[5] but the exact relationship between the Book of Isaiah
Isaiah
and any such historical Isaiah
Isaiah
is complicated. The traditional view is that all 66 chapters of the book of Isaiah
Isaiah
were written by one man, Isaiah, possibly in two periods between 740 BCE and c. 686 BCE, separated by approximately 15 years, and includes dramatic prophetic declarations of Cyrus the Great in the Bible, acting to restore the nation of Israel
Israel
from Babylonian captivity
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Benjacob
Isaac ben Jacob Benjacob (January 10, 1801, Ramygala
Ramygala
– July 2, 1863, Vilnius) was a Jewish, Russian-born Maskil, [1] best known as a bibliographer, author, and publisher
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a digital object identifier (DOI) is a persistent identifier or handle used to identify objects uniquely, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to identify their referents uniquely
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Morocco
Coordinates: 32°N 6°W / 32°N 6°W / 32; -6Kingdom of Moroccoالمملكة المغربية (Arabic) ⵜⴰⴳⵍⴷⵉⵜ ⵏ ⵍⵎⵖⵔⵉⴱ (Berber)FlagCoat of armsMotto:  لله، الوطن، الملك  (Arabic) Allah, Al Watan, Al Malik ⴰⴽⵓⵛ, ⴰⵎⵓⵔ, ⴰⴳⵍⵍⵉⴷ (Berber)"God, Homeland, King"Anthem:  النشيد الوطني المغربي  (Arabic) ⵉⵣⵍⵉ ⴰⵏⴰⵎⵓⵔ ⵏ ⵍⵎⵖⵔⵉⴱ  (Berber) Cherifian AnthemDark green: Internationally recognized territory of Morocco. Lighter green: Western Sahara, a territory claimed and mostly controlled by Morocco
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Public Domain
The public domain consists of all the creative works to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply
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Isidore Singer
Isidore Singer (10 November 1859, Hranice/Přerov District, Moravia, Austria – 1939, New York City) was an editor of the Jewish Encyclopedia and founder of the American League for the Rights of Man.Contents1 Biography1.1 France 1.2 New York2 Religious views 3 Publications 4 References4.1 SourcesBiography[edit] He was born in 1859 in Weisskirchen, Moravia, in the Austrian Empire (today, Hranice/Přerov District, Czech Republic). Singer studied at the Universities of Vienna
Vienna
and Berlin, receiving his Ph.D. in 1884.[1] France[edit] After editing the Allgemeine oesterreichische Literaturzeitung [Austrian literary newspaper] from 1885 to 1886, he became literary secretary to the French ambassador in Vienna.[2] From 1887, he worked in Paris
Paris
in the press bureau of the French foreign office and was active in the campaign on behalf of Alfred Dreyfus
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Jewish Encyclopedia
The Jewish Encyclopedia[n 1] is an English encyclopedia containing over 15,000 articles on the history, culture, and state of Judaism
Judaism
and the Jews
Jews
up to the early 20th century.[1] It was originally published in 12 volumes by Funk and Wagnalls
Funk and Wagnalls
of New York City
New York City
between 1901 and 1906 and reprinted in the 1960s by KTAV Publishing House. The work's scholarship is still highly regarded: the American Jewish Archives
American Jewish Archives
has called it "the most monumental Jewish scientific work of modern times"[2] and Rabbi
Rabbi
Joshua L
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially-based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names. The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
prepared cards of bibliographic information for their library catalog and would sell duplicate sets of the cards to other libraries for use in their catalogs
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. ISNI can be used to disambiguate names that might otherwise be confused, and links the data about names that are collected and used in all sectors of the media industries. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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