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Cha Gio
Chả giò (Vietnamese: [ca᷉ː jɔ̂]), also known as fried spring roll, is a popular dish in Vietnamese cuisine and usually served as an appetizer in Europe and North America, where there are large Vietnamese diaspora. It is ground meat, usually pork, wrapped in rice paper and deep-fried.[1][2] The main structure of a roll of chả giò is commonly seasoned ground meat, mushrooms, noodles, and diced vegetables such as carrots, kohlrabi and jicama, rolled up in a sheet of moist rice paper . The roll is then deep fried until the rice paper coat turns crispy and golden brown. The ingredients, however, are not fixed. The most commonly used meat is pork, but one can also use crab, shrimp, chicken, and sometimes snails (in northern Vietnam), and tofu (for vegetarian chả giò- 'chả giò chay')
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Hors D'oeuvre
An hors d'oeuvre (/ɔːr ˈdɜːrv(rə)/ or DURV(-rə); French: hors-d'œuvre [ɔʁ dœvʁ] (listen)), appetiser[1] or starter[2] is a small dish served before a meal[3] in European cuisine. Some hors d'oeuvres are served cold, others hot.[4] Hors d'oeuvres may be served at the dinner table as a part of the meal, or they may be served before seating, such as at a reception or cocktail party
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Egg Roll
Egg rolls are a variety of deep-fried appetizers served in American Chinese restaurants. An egg roll is a cylindrical, savory roll with shredded cabbage, chopped pork, and other fillings inside a thickly-wrapped wheat flour skin, which is fried in hot oil.[1] The dish is served warm, and is usually eaten with the fingers, dipped in duck sauce, soy sauce, plum sauce, or hot mustard,[2] often from a cellophane packet.[3] Egg rolls are a ubiquitous feature of American Chinese cuisine and are often served as free additions to American Chinese combination platters throughout the United States,[4][5] along with fried rice and fortune cookies. The origins of the dish are unclear and remain disputed. Egg rolls are closely related to, but distinct from, the spring rolls served in mainland China, and were first seen in the early 20th century in the United States
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Salad Roll
Gỏi cuốn,[1] Vietnamese spring roll, fresh spring roll, spring roll, or rice paper roll,[2][3][4][5][6] is a Vietnamese dish traditionally consisting of pork, prawn, vegetables, bún (rice vermicelli), and other ingredients wrapped in Vietnamese bánh tráng (commonly known as rice paper or cold roll).[7][8] Like other spring roll dishes, they are believed to have an origin in China and were introduced to Vietnam by Chinese immigrants although the gỏi cuốn has been modified to suit local tastes.[9][10] Gỏi cuốn are served fresh while others are served fried, like the Vietnamese chả giò.[11] They are served at room temperature (or cooled) and are not deep-fried or cooked on the outside
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Bánh Chưng
Bánh chưng is a traditional Vietnamese rice cake which is made from glutinous rice, mung beans, pork and other ingredients.[1] Its origin is told by the legend of Lang Liêu, a prince of the last king of the Sixth Hùng Dynasty, who became the successor thanks to his creation of bánh chưng and bánh giầy, which symbolized, respectively, the earth and the sky. Considered an essential element of the family altar on the occasion of tết, the making and eating of bánh chưng during this time is a well-preserved tradition of Vietnamese people. Beside the tết holiday, bánh chưng is also eaten all year round as Vietnamese cuisine. Women wear áo dài for their tradition. Traditionally, bánh chưng requires a preparation of many ingredients, each Vietnamese family which can afford such a preparation begins to make the cake from the 27th or 28th day of the December (tháng Chạp) in Lunar calendar
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Congee

Congee or conjee (/ˈkɒni/) is a type of rice porridge or gruel. The word 'congee' itself is a derivation of the Tamil word kañci or kanji.[1] When eaten as plain rice congee, it is most often served with side dishes. When additional ingredients such as meat, fish, and flavourings are added while preparing the congee, it is most often served as a meal on its own, especially for persons who are ill. Names for congee are as varied as the style of its preparation
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Cơm Tấm
Cơm Tấm or Com Tam (US: /kʌm təm/; Vietnamese: [kəːm tə̌m]) is a Vietnamese dish made from rice with fractured rice grains. Tấm refers to the broken rice grains, while cơm refers to cooked rice.[1][2] Although there are varied names like cơm tấm Sài Gòn (Saigon-style broken rice), particularly for Saigon,[1] the main ingredients remain the same for most cases. In its early days, Com Tam was a popular dish among poor rice farmers in the Mekong Delta due to their economic circumstances.[3] During bad rice seasons, these people didn't have enough good rice to sell, so they used broken rice to cook
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Bún Bò Huế
Bún bò Huế (pronounced [ɓun˧˥ ɓɔ˧˩ hwe˧˥]) or bún bò is a popular Vietnamese soup containing rice vermicelli (bún) and beef ().[1] Huế is a city in central Vietnam associated with the cooking style of the former royal court.[2] The dish is greatly admired for its balance of spicy, salty, and umami flavors. The predominant flavor is that of lemongrass.[3] Compared to phở or bún riêu, the noodles are thicker and more cylindrical.[4] Bún bò originated in Huế, a former capital of Vietnam. Outside the city of Huế and some parts of central Vietnam, it is called bún bò Huế to denote its origin. Within Huế and surrounding cities, it is known simply as bún bò. The broth is prepared by simmering beef bones and beef shank with lemongrass, and then seasoned with fermented shrimp sauce and sugar for taste
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