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Château De Loches
The Château de Loches
Loches
(also called Le Logis Royal de Loches) is a castle located in the département of Indre-et-Loire
Indre-et-Loire
in the Loire valley in France; it was constructed in the 9th century. Built some 500 metres (1,600 ft) away from the Indre River, the huge castle, famous mostly for its massive square keep, dominates the town of Loches. The castle was captured by King Philip II of France
France
in 1204
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Château De Montrésor
The Château de Montrésor is a medieval castle with a Renaissance mansion built in the grounds, located in the French village of Montrésor in the département of Indre-et-Loire.[1] The Château de Montrésor has been listed since 1996 as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture[1] and is a popular visitor attraction.Contents1 History1.1 Medieval fortress 1.2 Renaissance mansion 1.3 A Polish landlord and benefactor2 See also 3 References 4 External links4.1 SourcesHistory[edit] Medieval fortress[edit] Around 1005, Fulk Nerra, count of Anjou, chose a rocky overhang dominating the valley of the Indrois as the site to have a powerful fortress built by his captain Roger le Petit Diable ("Little Devil").[1] Montrésor had one of the first keeps built out of stone, similar to that at Loches, and two circular walls, of which today only the west wall remains
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Château De Montreuil-Bellay
The Château de Montreuil-Bellay is a historical building in the town of Montreuil-Bellay, département of Maine-et-Loire, France, first built on the site of a Gallo-Roman village high on a hill on the banks of the Thouet River. It is listed as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.[1] During the medieval period the property, consisting of more than 4 km2 (990 acres), was part of a group of 32 villages near-by that created the then known as "L'Anjou". The Mountreil-Bellay fief, first belonged to Gelduin le Danois afterward by regal hereditry passed to Berlay le Vieux who became the first Sir of Bellay, in 1025 the castle was seized by Foulque Nerra a Plantagenet making Giraud Berlay his vassal during the second half of the 12th century
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Château De Chinon
Château de Chinon
Chinon
is a castle located on the bank of the Vienne river in Chinon, France. It was founded by Theobald I, Count of Blois. In the 11th century the castle became the property of the counts of Anjou. In 1156 Henry II of England, a member of the House of Anjou, took the castle from his brother Geoffrey after Geoffrey had rebelled for a second time. Henry favoured the Château de Chinon
Chinon
as a residence. Most of the standing structure can be attributed to his reign and he died there in 1189. Early in the 13th century, King Philip II of France
Philip II of France
harassed the English lands in France and in 1205 he captured Chinon
Chinon
after a siege that lasted several months, after which the castle remained under French control
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Château De Gizeux
The Château de Gizeux is an important edifice, dating from the Middle Ages and much altered over the centuries, notably during the Renaissance and the Age of Enlightenment. The Château de Gizeux in located in the commune of Gizeux in the Indre-et-Loire département of France, in what used to be the province of Anjou. It is one of the Châteaux of the Loire. The château stands at the heart of the Parc naturel régional Loire-Anjou-Touraine. The building is 250 metres long, making it the longest château in Touraine angevine.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Description 4 See also 5 External links 6 ReferencesGeography[edit] The Château de Gizeux is situated some fifteen kilometres north of Bourgueil and 25 kilometres from Saumur, within the green and wooded parc naturel régional de Loire-Anjou-Touraine. It is midway between Angers and Tours. The château was part of the former province of Anjou and today is in Touraine angevine
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Marilyn Stokstad
Marilyn Stokstad (February 16, 1929 – March 4, 2016) was an American art historian of medieval and Spanish art, Judith Harris Murphy Distinguished Professor Emerita of Art History
Art History
at the University of Kansas, and an author of art-history textbooks, including Art History. First published in 1995, Art History
Art History
was widely adopted at colleges and universities throughout the US and is currently in its fifth edition.[1] In February 2016, Time Magazine named Dr
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Château Du Lude
The Château du Lude is one of the many great châteaux of the Loire Valley (Vallée de la Loire) in France. The château is situated in the commune of Le Lude in the Sarthe department in the region of Pays-de-la-Loire and stands at the crossroads of Anjou, Maine and Touraine. Le Lude is the most northerly château of the Loire Valley and one of the last important historic castles in France, still inhabited by the same family for the last 260 years. The château is testimony to four centuries of French architecture, as a stronghold transformed into an elegant house during the Renaissance and the 18th century. The monument is located in the valley of le Loir. Its gardens have evolved throughout the centuries
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French Ministry Of Culture
The Ministry of Culture (French: Ministère de la Culture) is the ministry of the Government of France
Government of France
in charge of national museums and the monuments historiques. Its goal is to maintain the French identity through the promotion and protection of the arts (visual, plastic, theatrical, musical, dance, architectural, literary, televisual and cinematographic) on national soil and abroad. Its budget is mainly dedicated to the management of the Archives Nationales (six national sites and hundred decentralised storage facilities) and the regional Maisons de la culture (culture centres). Its main office is in the Palais-Royal
Palais-Royal
in the 1st arrondissement of Paris.[1][2] It is headed by the Minister of Culture, a cabinet member
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Monument Historique
Monument historique
Monument historique
(French: [mɔnymɑ̃ istɔʁik]) is a designation given to some national heritage sites in France. It may also refer to the state procedure in France
France
by which National Heritage protection is extended to a building, a specific part of a building, a collection of buildings, garden, bridge, or other structure, because of their importance to France's architectural and historical cultural heritage.[1] Both public and privately owned structures may be listed in this way, as well as also movable objects. As of 2012 there were 44,236 monuments listed. Buildings may be given the classification for both their exteriors or interiors, including a building's décor, its furniture, a single room, or even a staircase
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French Revolution
The French Revolution
Revolution
(French: Révolution française [ʁevɔlysjɔ̃ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France
France
and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon
Napoleon
during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution
Revolution
overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon
Napoleon
who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond
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Louis XVI Of France
Louis XVI (French pronunciation: ​[lwi sɛːz]; 23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793), born Louis-Auguste, was the last King of France before the fall of the monarchy during the French Revolution. He was referred to as Citizen Louis Capet during the final weeks of his life. In 1765, at the death of his father, Louis, son and heir apparent of Louis XV, Louis-Auguste became the new Dauphin of France. Upon his grandfather's death on 10 May 1774, he assumed the title "King of France
France
and Navarre", which he used until 4 September 1791, when he received the title of "King of the French" until the monarchy was abolished on 21 September 1792. Louis XVI was guillotined on 21 January 1793. The first part of his reign was marked by attempts to reform France
France
in accordance with Enlightenment ideas. These included efforts to abolish serfdom, remove the taille, and increase tolerance toward non-Catholics
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin
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Château De Brissac
The Château
Château
de Brissac is a French château in the commune of Brissac-Quincé, located in the département of Maine-et-Loire, France. The property is owned by the Cossé-Brissac family, whose head bears the French noble title of Duke of Brissac.[1] The château is listed as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.[2]Contents1 History 2 The château today 3 In popular culture 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The château was originally built as a castle by the Counts of Anjou in the 11th century. After the victory over the English by King Philip II of France, he gave the property to Guillaume des Roches. In the 15th century, the structure was rebuilt by Pierre de Brézé, a wealthy chief minister to King Charles VII of France
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Château De Meung-sur-Loire
The Château de Meung-sur-Loire is a former castle and episcopal palace in the commune of Meung-sur-Loire in the Loiret département of France.[1] The château, located next to the collegial church, was the country residence of the Bishops of Orléans. It was built and destroyed several times. The oldest still existing parts date from the 12th century and were built by Manassès de Seignelay (bishop from 1207 to 1221). Still standing are the main rectangular plan building, flanked by three towers, a fourth having been destroyed. It was occupied by the English during the Hundred Years' War. The rear façade was rebuilt in the Classical style by Fleuriau d'Armenonville (bishop from 1706 to 1733)
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