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Château De Langeais
The Château de Langeais
Château de Langeais
is a medieval castle in Indre-et-Loire, France, built on a promontory created by the small valley of the Roumer River at the opening to the Loire Valley. Founded in 992 by Fulk Nerra, Count of Anjou, the castle was soon attacked by Odo I, Count of Blois. After the unsuccessful attack, the now-ruined stone keep was built; it is one of the earliest datable stone examples of a keep. Between 994 and 996 the castle was besieged unsuccessfully twice more. During the conflict between the counts of Anjou
Anjou
and Blois, the castle changed hands several times, and in 1038 Fulk captured the castle again. After it was destroyed during the Hundred Years' War, King Louis XI (1461–1483) rebuilt Château de Langeais
Château de Langeais
into what today is one of the best known examples of late medieval architecture
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Château De Gizeux
The Château de Gizeux
Gizeux
is an important edifice, dating from the Middle Ages and much altered over the centuries, notably during the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Enlightenment. The Château de Gizeux
Gizeux
in located in the commune of Gizeux
Gizeux
in the Indre-et-Loire
Indre-et-Loire
département of France, in what used to be the province of Anjou. It is one of the Châteaux of the Loire. The château stands at the heart of the Parc naturel régional Loire-Anjou-Touraine
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Richerus
Richerus or Richer of Reims
Reims
(fl. 10th century) was a monk of Saint-Remi, just outside Reims, and a historian, an important source for the contemporary kingdom of France.Contents1 Life 2 Historiae 3 References 4 Bibliography4.1 Editions and translations 4.2 Secondary literature4.2.1 External linksLife[edit] He was a son of Rodulf, a trusted councillor and captain of Louis IV of France
France
(r. 936-954). He studied at Reims
Reims
under Gerbert, afterwards Pope Silvester II, who taught him mathematics, history, letters and eloquence. He was also well versed in the medical science of his time, and in 991 travelled to Chartres
Chartres
to consult the medical manuscripts there
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Château De Brissac
The Château
Château
de Brissac is a French château in the commune of Brissac-Quincé, located in the département of Maine-et-Loire, France. The property is owned by the Cossé-Brissac family, whose head bears the French noble title of Duke of Brissac.[1] The château is listed as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.[2]Contents1 History 2 The château today 3 In popular culture 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The château was originally built as a castle by the Counts of Anjou in the 11th century. After the victory over the English by King Philip II of France, he gave the property to Guillaume des Roches. In the 15th century, the structure was rebuilt by Pierre de Brézé, a wealthy chief minister to King Charles VII of France
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Robert Knecht
Robert Jean Knecht (born 20 September 1926) is a historian, an expert on 16th century France, Emeritus Professor of French history at the University of Birmingham, where he taught during 1956–1994.[1] The only child of French parents living in London, he was educated at the French Lycée in London and the Salesian College, Farnborough. He graduated at King's College London in 1948 and qualified as a teacher in 1949. In 1953 he was awarded the M.A. degree of London university for which he submitted a thesis on Cardinal John Morton and his episcopal colleagues. He was then employed by a firm of industrial designers to collect and exhibit old prints and to write explanatory booklets for three theme pubs in London. In 1954 he carried out research on MPs in the Cinque Ports for the early Tudor volume of the History of Parliament and wrote the chapter on schools in Salisbury during the nineteenth century for the Victoria County History
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Jim Bradbury
Jim Bradbury (born 27 February 1937) is a British historian specialising in the military history of the Middle Ages. Bradbury lectured in history at Brunel University. Selected works[edit](1975) "Shakespeare and his Theatre", Longman, ISBN 0-582-20539-5 (1985) The Medieval Archer, The Boydell Press, ISBN 0-85115-194-9 (1988) "Introduction to The Buckinghamshire Domesday", Alecto Historical Editions, ISBN 0-948459-86-7 (1992) The Medieval Siege, The Boydell Press, ISBN 1-85285-528-2 (1996) Stephen and Matilda: Civil War of 1139-53, Sutton Publishing, ISBN 0-7509-0612-X (1997) Philip Augustus: King of France, 1180-1223, Longman, ISBN 0-582-06058-3 (1998) The Battle of Hastings, Sutton Publishing, ISBN 0-7509-1291-X (2004) The Routledge Companion to Medieval Warfare, London: Routledge, ISBN 0-415-22126-9
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Bernard Bachrach
Bernard S. Bachrach (born 1939[1]) is an American historian and a professor of history at the University of Minnesota. He specializes in the Early Middle Ages, mainly on the topics of Medieval warfare, Medieval Jewry, and early Angevin history (he has written a biography of Fulk Nerra). He received the CEE Distinguished Teaching Award from the University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
in 1993 and entered the College of Liberal Arts Scholars of the College at Minnesota in 2000. He has also been the recipient of a McKnight Research Award. He has translated the Liber historiae Francorum from Latin into English. Works[edit]Merovingian Military Organization, 481-751, University of Minnesota Press, 1972. ISBN 0-8166-0621-8 Early Carolingian Warfare: Prelude to Empire, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001
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Romanesque Architecture
Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
is an architectural style of medieval Europe characterized by semi-circular arches. There is no consensus for the beginning date of the Romanesque style, with proposals ranging from the 6th to the 11th century, this later date being the most commonly held. It developed in the 12th century into the Gothic style, marked by pointed arches. Examples of Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
can be found across the continent, making it the first pan-European architectural style since Imperial Roman architecture. The Romanesque style in England is traditionally referred to as Norman architecture. Combining features of ancient Roman and Byzantine buildings and other local traditions, Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
is known by its massive quality, thick walls, round arches, sturdy pillars, barrel vaults, large towers and decorative arcading
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Brittany
Brittany
Brittany
(/ˈbrɪtəni/; French: Bretagne [bʁətaɲ] ( listen); Breton: Breizh, pronounced [bʁɛjs] or [bʁɛχ];[1] Gallo: Bertaèyn, pronounced [bəʁtaɛɲ]) is a cultural region in the northwest of France, covering the western part of what was known as Armorica
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Philip II Of France
Philip II, known as Philip Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste; 21 August 1165 – 14 July 1223), was King of France
King of France
from 1180 to 1223, a member of the House of Capet
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Richard I Of England
Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England
King of England
from 6 July 1189 until his death. He also ruled as Duke of Normandy, Aquitaine and Gascony, Lord of Cyprus, Count of Poitiers, Anjou, Maine, and Nantes, and was overlord of Brittany
Brittany
at various times during the same period. He was the third of five sons of King Henry II of England and Duchess Eleanor of Aquitaine
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Theobald III, Count Of Blois
Theobald III of Blois
Blois
(French: Thibaut) (1012–1089) was count of Blois, Meaux
Meaux
and Troyes. He was son of Odo II, Count of Blois[1] and Ermengarde of Auvergne.[2]Contents1 Inherits Blois 2 Gains Champagne 3 Death 4 Family and children 5 References 6 SourcesInherits Blois[edit] Upon his father's death in 1037, Theobald inherited amongst others the counties of Blois,[1] Tours, Chartres. Châteaudun
Châteaudun
and Sancerre, and also in Champagne: Château-Thierry, Provins
Provins
and St. Florentin. His brother Stephen inherited the counties of Meaux, Troyes
Troyes
and Vitry-le-François
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Odo II, Count Of Blois
Odo II (French: Eudes le Champenois) (983 – 15 November 1037) was the Count of Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Beauvais
Beauvais
and Tours from 1004 and Count of Troyes
Count of Troyes
(as
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Château De Montrésor
The Château de Montrésor
Montrésor
is a medieval castle with a Renaissance mansion built in the grounds, located in the French village of Montrésor
Montrésor
in the département of Indre-et-Loire.[1] The Château de
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