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Ceremonial Counties Of England
The ceremonial counties,[2] also referred to as the lieutenancy areas of England,[3] are areas of England
England
to which a Lord Lieutenant
Lord Lieutenant
is appointed. Legally the areas in England, as well as in Wales and Scotland, are defined by the Lieutenancies Act 1997
Lieutenancies Act 1997
as counties and areas for the purposes of the lieutenancies in Great Britain, in contrast to the areas used for local government
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Historic Counties Of England
The historic counties of England
England
are areas that were established for administration by the Normans, in most cases based on earlier kingdoms and shires established by the Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
and others
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Huntingdon And Peterborough
Huntingdon
Huntingdon
and Peterborough
Peterborough
was a short-lived administrative and geographical county in East Anglia
East Anglia
in the United Kingdom. It existed from 1965 to 1974, when it became part of Cambridgeshire.Contents1 Formation1.1 Emergency services2 Districts 3 Coat of arms 4 Abolition 5 Legacy 6 References 7 See alsoFormation[edit] The Local Government Act 1888
Local Government Act 1888
created four small neighbouring administrative counties in the east of England: Cambridgeshire, Isle of Ely, Huntingdonshire
Huntingdonshire
and the Soke of Peterborough. Following the Second World War, a Local Government Boundary Commission was formed to review county-level administration in England and Wales. The commission was of the opinion that counties needed to have a population of between 200,000 and one million in order to provide effective services
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West Suffolk
West Suffolk
Suffolk
was an administrative county of England
England
created in 1889 from part of the county of Suffolk. It survived until 1974 when it was rejoined with East Suffolk. Its county town was Bury St Edmunds. Before the introduction of county councils, Suffolk
Suffolk
had been divided into eastern and western divisions, each with their own quarter sessions. The western division corresponded to the Liberty of Saint Edmund. This area had been established by Edward the Confessor
Edward the Confessor
in 1044 and was a separate jurisdiction under the control of the abbot of Bury St Edmunds Abbey until the dissolution of the monasteries. This history was reflected in the coat of arms of the county council. The council initially adopted the attributed arms of Edward the Confessor: a cross patonce between five martlets
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County Borough Of Ipswich
Ipswich
Ipswich
was a local government district covering the town of Ipswich, East Suffolk
Suffolk
from 1835 to 1974. It was a municipal borough from 1835 and a county borough from 1889. It originated from the ancient borough of Ipswich. The local authority was Ipswich
Ipswich
Corporation. In 1974 it was replaced by the non-metropolitan district of Ipswich
Ipswich
and Ipswich Borough Council became the local authority, with county council duties fulfilled by Suffolk
Suffolk
County Council. Following the Local Government Act 1888
Local Government Act 1888
the county of Suffolk
Suffolk
was split into East Suffolk
Suffolk
and West Suffolk
Suffolk
for administrative purposes and the term administrative county was introduced
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Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
(/ˈsʌfək/) is an East Anglian county of historic origin in England. It has borders with Norfolk
Norfolk
to the north, Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
to the west and Essex
Essex
to the south. The North Sea
North Sea
lies to the east. The county town is Ipswich; other important towns include Lowestoft, Bury St Edmunds, Newmarket and Felixstowe, one of the largest container ports in Europe.[2] The county is low-lying with very few hills, and is largely arable land with the wetlands of the Broads in the north
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Isle Of Wight
The Isle of Wight
Isle of Wight
(/waɪt/; also referred to informally as IoW or The Island)[4] is a county and the largest and second-most populous island in England. It is in the English Channel, about 2 miles (3.2 km) off the coast of Hampshire, separated by the Solent. The island has resorts that have been holiday destinations since Victorian times, and is known for its mild climate, coastal scenery, and verdant landscape of fields, downland and chines. The island has been home to the poets Swinburne and Tennyson and to Queen Victoria, who built her much-loved summer residence and final home Osborne House
Osborne House
at East Cowes. It has a maritime and industrial tradition including boat-building, sail-making, the manufacture of flying boats, the hovercraft, and Britain's space rockets
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Hampshire
Hampshire
Hampshire
(/ˈhæmpʃər/, /-ʃɪər/ ( listen); abbreviated Hants)[a] is a county on the southern coast of England
England
in the United Kingdom. The county town of Hampshire
Hampshire
is Winchester, the former capital city of England.[1] Hampshire
Hampshire
is the most populous ceremonial county in the United Kingdom (excluding the metropolitan counties). Its the two largest settlements, Southampton
Southampton
and Portsmouth, are administered separately as unitary authorities. The rest of the area forms the administrative county, which is governed by Hampshire
Hampshire
County Council
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Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) is a national mapping agency in the United Kingdom which covers the island of Great Britain.[1] It is one of the world's largest producers of maps. Since 1 April 2015 it has operated as Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
Ltd, a government-owned company, 100% in public ownership. The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
Board remains accountable to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. It is also a member of the Public Data Group. The agency's name indicates its original military purpose (see ordnance and surveying), which was to map Scotland
Scotland
in the wake of the Jacobite rising of 1745
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Caversham, Berkshire
Caversham is a suburb in the Borough of Reading, a unitary authority, in the royal, non-administrative county of Berkshire, England. Originally a village founded in the Middle Ages, it lies on the north bank of the River Thames, opposite the rest of Reading. Caversham Bridge, Reading Bridge
Reading Bridge
and Caversham Lock
Caversham Lock
(pedestrians only) provide crossing points, with Sonning Bridge
Sonning Bridge
also available a few miles east of Caversham. Caversham has at Caversham Court
Caversham Court
foundations of a medieval house, a herb garden and tree-lined park open to the public at no charge, Caversham Lakes
Caversham Lakes
and marking its south and south-east border the Thames Path National Trail. Caversham extends from the River Thames
River Thames
flood plain to just south of the Chilterns
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Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
(/ˈɒksfərdʃər/ or /-ʃɪər/; often abbreviated Oxon from Oxonium, the Latin name of the city and county of Oxford) is a county in England
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Reading, Berkshire
Reading (/ˈrɛdɪŋ/ ( listen) RED-ing)[5] is a large, historically important minster town in Berkshire, England, of which it is the county town. It is located in the Thames Valley
Thames Valley
at the confluence of the River Thames
River Thames
and River Kennet, and on both the Great Western Main Line railway and the M4 motorway. Reading is 70 miles (110 km) east of Bristol, 24 miles (39 km) south of Oxford, 37 miles (60 km) west of London, 14 miles (23 km) north of Basingstoke, 12 miles (19 km) south-west of Maidenhead
Maidenhead
and 15 miles (24 km) east of Newbury as the crow flies. The first evidence for Reading as a settlement dates from the 8th century
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Berkshire
Berkshire
Berkshire
(/ˈbɑːrkʃər/, abbreviated Berks, in the 17th century sometimes spelled Barkeshire as it is pronounced) is a county in south east England, west of London
London
and is one of the home counties. It was recognised by the Queen as the Royal County of Berkshire
Berkshire
in 1957 because of the presence of Windsor Castle, and letters patent were issued in 1974.[2][3] Berkshire
Berkshire
is a county of historic origin and is a home county, a ceremonial county and a non-metropolitan county without a county council. The historic boundary to the north of Berkshire
Berkshire
follows the River Thames, from Buscot
Buscot
to Old Windsor
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Lord Lieutenant Of Middlesex
A lieutenant (abbreviated Lt, LT, Lieut and similar) is a junior commissioned officer in the armed forces, fire services, police and other organizations of many nations. The meaning of lieutenant differs in different military formations (see comparative military ranks), but is often subdivided into senior (first lieutenant) and junior (second lieutenant) ranks. In navies it is often equivalent to the army rank of captain; it may also indicate a particular post rather than a rank. The rank is also used in fire services, emergency medical services, security services and police forces. Lieutenant
Lieutenant
may also appear as part of a title used in various other organisations with a codified command structure. It often designates someone who is "second-in-command", and as such, may precede the name of the rank directly above it
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Municipal Borough
Municipal boroughs were a type of local government district which existed in England and Wales
England and Wales
between 1835 and 1974, in Northern Ireland from 1840 to 1973 and in the Republic of Ireland
Republic of Ireland
from 1840 to 2002. Broadly similar structures existed in Scotland
Scotland
from 1833 to 1975 with the reform of royal burghs and creation of police burghs.Contents1 England
England
and Wales1.1 Municipal Corporations Act 1835 1.2 Corporation and council1.2.1 Town councils1.3 County and non-county boroughs 1.4 Abolition2 Ireland 1840–1922 3 Northern Ireland 4 Irish Free State
Irish Free State
and the Republic of Ireland 5 See also 6 References England
England
and Wales[edit] Municipal Corporations Act 1835[edit] Boroughs had existed in England and Wales
England and Wales
since mediæval times
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Lord Lieutenant Of The County Of London
This is a list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of the County of London. The post was created in 1889, absorbing the duties of the Lord Lieutenant of the Tower Hamlets, and abolished in 1965, when it was merged with that of Lord Lieutenant of Middlesex to become the Lord Lieutenant of Greater London.Hugh Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster 1 April 1889 – 22 December 1899 Alexander Duff, 1st Duke of Fife 12 February 1900 – 12 January 1912[1] Robert Crewe-Milnes, 1st Marquess of Crewe 24 June 1912 – 5 July 1944 Gerald Wellesley, 7th Duke of Wellington 5 July 1944 – 13 September 1949 Archibald Wavell, 1st Earl Wavell 13 September 1949 – 24 May 1950 Alan Brooke, 1st Viscount Alanbrooke 23 August 1950 – 25 April 1957 Harold Alexander, 1st Earl Alexander of Tunis 17 May 1957 – 1965See also[edit]High Sheriff of the County of LondonReferences[edit]J.C. Sainty (1979). List of Lieutenants of Counties of England and Wales 1660-1974
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