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Ceratophyllum
Ceratophyllum
Ceratophyllum
is a cosmopolitan genus of flowering plants including four accepted species in 2016,[3] commonly found in ponds, marshes, and quiet streams in tropical and in temperate regions. It is the only genus in the family Ceratophyllaceae,[2] itself the only family in the order Ceratophyllales.[4] They are usually called coontails or hornworts, although hornwort is also used for unrelated plants of the division Anthocerotophyta. Ceratophyllum
Ceratophyllum
grows completely submerged, usually, though not always, floating on the surface, and does not tolerate drought. The plant stems can reach 1–3 m in length. At intervals along nodes of the stem they produce rings of bright green leaves, which are narrow and often much-branched. The forked leaves are brittle and stiff to the touch in some species, softer in others
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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FloraBase
FloraBase is a public access web-based database of the flora of Western Australia. It provides authoritative scientific information on 12,978 taxa, including descriptions, maps, images, conservation status and nomenclatural details. 1,272 alien taxa (naturalised weeds) are also recorded.[1] The system takes data from datasets including the Census of Western Australian Plants and the Western Australian Herbarium specimen database of nearly 725,000 vouchered plant collections.[2] It is operated by the Western Australian Herbarium within the Department of Parks and Wildlife. It was established in November 1998. In its distribution guide it uses a combination of IBRA
IBRA
version 5.1 and John Stanley Beard's botanical provinces. See also[edit]Declared Rare and Priority Flora ListReferences[edit]^ "2005-06 Annual Report" (PDF). Department of Parks and Wildlife. pp. (p.61)
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Chloranthales
Chloranthaceae
Chloranthaceae
/ˌklɔːrænˈθeɪʃiː/ is a family of flowering plants (angiosperms), the only family in the order Chloranthales.[1] It is not closely related to any other family of flowering plants, and is among the early-diverging lineages in the angiosperms. They are woody or weakly woody plants occurring in Southeast Asia, the Pacific, Madagascar, Central and South America, and the West Indies. The family consists of four extant genera, totalling about 77 known species according to Christenhusz and Byng in 2016.[2] Some species are used in traditional medicine. The type genus is Chloranthus.Contents1 Description1.1 Differences between the genera2 Taxonomy2.1 Historical classifications3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] Chloranthaceae
Chloranthaceae
are fragrant shrubs or herbaceous plants, that only produce side branches on the new growth
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Monocots
An economically important monocotScientific classification Kingdom: PlantaeClade: AngiospermsClade: MonocotsType genusLilium L.[1]Ordersalismatid monocotsAcorales Alismataleslilioid monocotsAsparagales Dioscoreales Liliales Pandanales Petrosavialescommelinid monocotsArecales Commelinales Poales ZingiberalesSynonymsAlternifoliae Bessey[2] Endogenae DC.[3] Lilianae
Lilianae
Takht.[4][5] Liliatae Cronquist,
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Wikidata
Wikidata
Wikidata
is a collaboratively edited knowledge base hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. It is intended to provide a common source of data which can be used by Wikimedia projects such as,[4][5] and by anyone else, under a public domain license. This is similar to the way Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
provides storage for media files and access to those files for all Wikimedia projects, and which are also freely available for reuse. Wikidata
Wikidata
is powered by the software Wikibase.[6]Contents1 Concepts 2 Development history2.1 Phase 1 2.2 Phase 2 2.3 Phase 33 Reception 4 Logo 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksConcepts[edit]ScreenshotsThree statements from Wikidata's item on the planet Mars
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Encyclopedia Of Life
The Encyclopedia of Life
Life
(EOL) is a free, online collaborative encyclopedia intended to document all of the 1.9 million living species known to science. It is compiled from existing databases and from contributions by experts and non-experts throughout the world.[2] It aims to build one "infinitely expandable" page for each species, including video, sound, images, graphics, as well as text.[3] In addition, the Encyclopedia incorporates content from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, which digitizes millions of pages of printed literature from the world's major natural history libraries. The project was initially backed by a US$50 million funding commitment, led by the MacArthur Foundation
MacArthur Foundation
and the Sloan Foundation, who provided US$20 million and US$5 million, respectively
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EPPO Code
An EPPO code, formerly known as a Bayer code, is an encoded identifier that is used by the European and Mediterranean Plant
Plant
Protection Organization (EPPO), in a system designed to uniquely identify organisms – namely plants, pests and pathogens – that are important to agriculture and crop protection. EPPO codes are a core component of a database of names, both scientific and vernacular. Although originally started by the Bayer Corporation, the official list of codes is now maintained by EPPO.[1]Contents1 EPPO code database1.1 Example2 External links 3 ReferencesEPPO code database[edit] All codes and their associated names are included in a database (EPPO Global Database). In total, there are over 68,500 species listed in the EPPO database, including:[2]36,000 species of plants (e.g. cultivated, wild plants and weeds) 24,000 species of animals (e.g. insects, mites, nematodes, rodents), biocontrol agents 8,500 microorganism species (e.g
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Flora Of North America
The Flora of North America
North America
North of Mexico
Mexico
(usually referred to as FNA) is a multivolume work describing the native plants of North America. Much of the Flora is already available online.[1] It is expected to fill 30 volumes when completed, and will be the first work to treat all of the known flora north of Mexico. It is a collaboration of over 800 authors, who collaborate over the web.[2] References[edit]^ "Flora of North America". eFloras.org. Retrieved 2012-11-05.  ^ Tomlinson, K.L.; Sanchez, J.A.; Spasser, M.A.; Schnase, J.L. (1998), Managing cognitive overload in the Flora of North America
North America
project, 2, p. 296, doi:10.1109/HICSS.1998.651712 External links[edit]Flora of North America
North America
— HomepageThis article about a book on botany or plants is a stub
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Amborellales
Amborella
Amborella
is a monotypic genus of understory shrubs or small trees endemic to the main island, Grande Terre, of New Caledonia.[4] The genus is the only member of the family Amborellaceae
Amborellaceae
and the order Amborellales
Amborellales
and contains a single species, Amborella
Amborella
trichopoda.[5] Amborella
Amborella
is of great interest to plant systematists because molecular phylogenetic analyses consistently place it as the sister group of the remaining flowering plants.Contents1 Description 2 Phylogeny 3 Classification3.1 Older systems4 Genomic and evolutionary considerations 5 Ecology 6 Conservation 7 Gallery 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksDescription[edit] Amborella
Amborella
is a sprawling shrub or small tree up to 8 m high
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Flora Of China
The flora of China
China
is diverse. More than 30,000 plant species are native to China, representing nearly one-eighth of the world's total plant species, including thousands found nowhere else on Earth. China
China
contains a variety of forest types. Both northeast and northwest reaches contain mountains and cold coniferous forests, supporting animal species which include moose and Asiatic black bear, along with some 120 types of birds. Moist conifer forests can have thickets of bamboo as an understorey, replaced by rhododendrons in higher montane stands of juniper and yew
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Fossilworks
Fossilworks is a portal which provides query, download, and analysis tools to facilitate access to the Paleobiology Database, a large relational database assembled by hundreds of paleontologists from around the world. History[edit] Fossilworks was created in 2013 by John Alroy and is housed at Macquarie University. It includes many analysis and data visualization tools formerly included in the Paleobiology Database.[1] References[edit]^ "Frequently asked questions". Fossilworks. Retrieved 21 May 2014. External links[edit]"Fossilworks"
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Global Biodiversity Information Facility
The Global Biodiversity
Biodiversity
Information Facility (GBIF) is an international organisation that focuses on making scientific data on biodiversity available via the Internet
Internet
using web services. The data are provided by many institutions from around the world; GBIF's information architecture makes these data accessible and searchable through a single portal. Data available through the GBIF portal are primarily distribution data on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes for the world, and scientific names data. The mission of the Global Biodiversity
Biodiversity
information Facility (GBIF) is to facilitate free and open access to biodiversity data worldwide to underpin sustainable development
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