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Cent (currency)
In many national currencies, the cent, commonly represented by the cent sign (a minuscule letter "c" crossed by a diagonal stroke or a vertical line: ¢; or a simple "c") is a monetary unit that equals ​1⁄100 of the basic monetary unit. Etymologically, the word cent derives from the Latin
Latin
word "centum" meaning hundred. Cent also refers to a coin worth one cent. In the United States, the 1¢ coin is generally known by the nickname penny, alluding to the British coin and unit of that name. In Canada, the 1¢ coin is no longer produced since 2012.Contents1 Symbol 2 Usage 3 See also 4 ReferencesSymbol[edit] "¢" redirects here. For the musical symbol, see cut time. A cent is commonly represented by the cent sign, a minuscule letter "c" crossed by a diagonal stroke or a vertical line: ¢; or a simple "c", depending on the currency (see below)
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East India Company
The East India
India
Company (EIC), also known as the Honourable East India Company (HEIC) or the British East India
India
Company and informally as John Company,[1] was an English and later British joint-stock company,[2] that was formed to pursue trade with the "East Indies"[citation needed] (in present-day terms, Maritime Southeast Asia), but ended up trading mainly with Qing China
Qing China
and seizing control of large parts of the Indian subcontinent. Originally chartered as the "Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading into the East Indies", the company rose to account for half of the world's trade[citation needed], particularly in basic commodities including cotton, silk, indigo dye, salt, saltpetre, tea, and opium
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Code Page
In computing, a code page is a table of values that describes the character set used for encoding a particular set of characters, usually combined with a number of control characters. The term "code page" originated from IBM's EBCDIC-based mainframe systems,[1] but Microsoft, SAP,[2] and Oracle Corporation[3] are among the few vendors which use this term. The majority of vendors identify their own character sets by a name. In the case when there is a plethora of character sets (like in IBM), identifying character sets through a number is a convenient way to distinguish them. Originally, the code page numbers referred to the page numbers in the IBM
IBM
standard character set manual,[4][5][6] a condition which has not held for a long time
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Cuban Peso
The peso ( ISO 4217
ISO 4217
code: CUP, sometimes called the "national currency" or in Spanish moneda nacional) is one of two official currencies in use in Cuba, the other being the convertible peso ( ISO 4217
ISO 4217
code: CUC, occasionally called "dollar" in the spoken language). There are currently 25 CUP per CUC. Most Cuban state workers receive their wages in national pesos, but some receive a portion of their salary in convertible pesos. Shops that sell basics like fruit and vegetables generally accept only the normal peso. "Dollar shops" sell the rest. The word "pesos" may refer to both types of money. Cuban convertible pesos are 25 times more valuable, but that does not completely eliminate the confusion for tourists
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Chilean Peso
The peso is the currency of Chile. The current peso has circulated since 1975, with a previous version circulating between 1817 and 1960. Its symbol is defined as a letter S with either one or two vertical bars superimposed prefixing the amount,[1] $ or ; the single-bar symbol, available in most modern text systems, is almost always used. Both of these symbols are used by many currencies, most notably the US dollar, and may be ambiguous without clarification such as CLP$ or US$. The ISO 4217
ISO 4217
code for the present peso is CLP. It is officially subdivided into 100 centavos, although there are no current centavo-denominated coins. The exchange rate was around CLP$600 to 1 U.S
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Argentine Peso
The peso (established as the peso convertible) is the currency of Argentina, identified by the symbol $ preceding the amount in the same way as many countries using dollar currencies. It is subdivided into 100 centavos. Its ISO 4217
ISO 4217
code is ARS. Since the late 20th century, the Argentine peso
Argentine peso
has experienced a substantial rate of devaluation, reaching 25% in 2017. The official exchange rate for the United States dollar
United States dollar
hovered around 3:1 from 2002 to 2008, climbing to 6:1 between 2009 and 2013
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Queen Victoria
Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom
Queen of the United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. On 1 May 1876, she adopted the additional title of Empress of India. Victoria was the daughter of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, the fourth son of King George III. Both the Duke of Kent and King George III
King George III
died in 1820, and Victoria was raised under close supervision by her German-born mother, Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. She inherited the throne at the age of 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died, leaving no surviving legitimate children. The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
was already an established constitutional monarchy, in which the sovereign held relatively little direct political power
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Unix
Unix
Unix
(/ˈjuːnɪks/; trademarked as UNIX) is a family of multitasking, multiuser computer operating systems that derive from the original AT&T Unix, development starting in the 1970s at the Bell Labs research center by Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and others.[3] Initially intended for use inside the Bell System, AT&T licensed Unix
Unix
to outside parties in the late 1970s, leading to a variety of both academic and commercial Unix
Unix
variants from vendors like the University of California, Berkeley
University of California, Berkeley
(BSD), Microsoft
Microsoft
(Xenix), IBM (AIX), and Sun Microsystems
Sun Microsystems
(Solaris)
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Option Key
The Option key
Option key
is a modifier key (ALT) present on Apple keyboards. It is located between the Control key
Control key
and Command key
Command key
on a typical Mac keyboard. There are two option keys on modern Mac desktop and notebook keyboards, one on each side of the space bar. Apple commonly uses the symbol U+2325 ⌥ option key[1] to represent the Option key. From 1980 to 1984, on the Apple II family, this key was known as the closed apple key, and had a black line drawing of a filled-in apple on it. (See command key for information about the history and the "open apple".) Since the 1990s, "alt" typically appears on the key, as well, for use as an Alt key
Alt key
with non-Mac software, such as Unix and Windows programs
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Macintosh
The Macintosh
Macintosh
(/ˈmækɪnˌtɒʃ/ MAK-in-tosh; branded as Mac since 1998) is a family of personal computers designed, manufactured, and sold by Apple Inc.
Apple Inc.
since January 1984
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Numeric Keypad
A numeric keypad, number pad, numpad, or ten key,[1][2][3] is the palm-sized, 17-key section of a standard computer keyboard, usually on the far right. It provides calculator-style efficiency for entering numbers. The numpad's keys are digits 0 to 9, + (addition), - (subtraction), * (multiplication) and / (division) symbols, . (decimal point), Num Lock, and ↵ Enter keys.[4] Laptop
Laptop
keyboards often do not have a numpad, but may provide numpad input by holding a modifier key (typically labelled Fn) and operating keys on the standard keyboard
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Alt Key
The Alt key
Alt key
(pronounced /ˈɔːlt/ or /ˈʌlt/) on a computer keyboard is used to change (alternate) the function of other pressed keys. Thus, the Alt key
Alt key
is a modifier key, used in a similar fashion to the Shift key. For example, simply pressing "A" will type the letter a, but if you hold down either Alt key
Alt key
while pressing A, the computer will perform an Alt+A function, which varies from program to program. The international standard ISO/IEC 9995-2 calls it Alternate key. The key is located on either side of the Space bar, but in non-US PC keyboard layouts, rather than a second Alt key, there is an 'Alt Gr' key to the right of the space bar
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Microsoft Windows
Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows is a group of several graphical operating system families, all of which are developed, marketed, and sold by Microsoft. Each family caters to a certain sector of the computing industry. Active Windows families include Windows NT
Windows NT
and Windows Embedded; these may encompass subfamilies, e.g. Windows Embedded
Windows Embedded
Compact (Windows CE) or Windows Server
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DOS
DOS
DOS
(/dɒs/, /dɔːs/[1]) is a family of disk operating systems.[2] DOS
DOS
primarily consists of MS-DOS
MS-DOS
and a rebranded version under the name IBM PC
IBM PC
DOS, both of which were introduced in 1981. Other later compatible systems from other manufacturers include DR-DOS
DR-DOS
(1988), ROM-DOS (1989), PTS-DOS (1993), and FreeDOS
FreeDOS
(1998). MS-DOS
MS-DOS
dominated the x86-based IBM PC compatible
IBM PC compatible
market between 1981 and 1995. Dozens of other operating systems also use the acronym "DOS", including the mainframe DOS/360 from 1966
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Unicode
Unicode
Unicode
is a computing industry standard for the consistent encoding, representation, and handling of text expressed in most of the world's writing systems. The latest version contains a repertoire of 136,755 characters covering 139 modern and historic scripts, as well as multiple symbol sets
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Linux
Linux
Linux
(/ˈlɪnəks/ ( listen) LIN-əks)[9][10] is a family of free and open-source software operating systems built around the Linux
Linux
kernel. Typically, Linux
Linux
is packaged in a form known as a Linux distribution (or distro for short) for both desktop and server use. The defining component of a Linux distribution
Linux distribution
is the Linux kernel,[11] an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991, by Linus Torvalds.[12][13][14] Many Linux
Linux
distributions use the word "Linux" in their name
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.