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Ceili Dance
Ceili dances, or true ceili dances (fíor céili) are a popular form of folk dancing in Ireland. Ceili dances are based on heys ("hedges", pairs of lines facing), round dances, long dances, and quadrilles,[1] generally revived during the Gaelic revival
Gaelic revival
in the first quarter of the twentieth century [2] and codified by the Irish Dancing Commission.[3] These thirty dances form the basis for examination of Ceili dance teachers. Irish ceili is a participatory social event attended by both men and women and accompanied by live Irish traditional music. The dance emerged within cultural nationalist consciousness as during the 19th and early 20th century, traditions promoting nationalist agendas were promoted and national identities were regarded as culturally unified. Irish ceili regained its popularity in the 19th century, when Ireland took effort to regain its cultural and political autonomy after being colonized for 800 years
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Tiana Coudray
Tiana Michelle Coudray (born August 8, 1988 in Santa Barbara, California) is an American equestrian and dancer.[1] Her usual horse is Ringwood Magister, but she has also ridden Ravens Choice and especially Saxon Legacy several times
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Folk Dance
Folk dance
Folk dance
are dances that are developed by people that reflect the life of the people of a certain country or region. Not all ethnic dances are folk dancesfor example ritual dances or dances of ritual origin are not considered to be folk dances. Ritual dances are usually called "Religious dances" because of their purpose.Play mediaKörtánc - Hungarian (csango) folk danceThe terms "ethnic" and "traditional" are used when it is required to emphasize the cultural roots of the dance. In this sense, nearly all folk dances are ethnic ones
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Caller (dance)
A caller is a person who prompts dance figures in such dances as line dance, square dance, and contra dance. The caller might be one of the participating dancers, though in modern country dance this is rare. In round dance a person who performs this function is called a cuer. Their role is fundamentally the same as a caller, in that they tell dancers what to do in a given dance, though they differ on several smaller points. In northern New England contra dancing, the caller is also known as the prompter.Contents1 Comparing callers and cuers 2 The modern Western square dance caller2.1 Call types2.1.1 Patter calls 2.1.2 Singing calls2.2 Programming 2.3 Training to call3 The round dance cuer 4 The Salsa Rueda caller 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksComparing callers and cuers[edit] Callers and cuers serve slightly different functions in different types of dance
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Round Dance
Modern social round dancing is choreographed and cued ballroom dancing that progresses in a circular pattern, counter-clockwise around the dance floor. The two major categories of ballroom rhythm found in round dancing are the smooth or international rhythms, such as foxtrot and waltz, and the Latin rhythms, such as cha-cha and rhumba. It is not to be confused with circle dancing, which is a type of folk dance where dancers are connected in a circular chain.Contents1 Description 2 Types 3 See also 4 External linksDescription[edit] Round dancing differs from free-style ballroom dancing in that each round dance has been fully choreographed ahead of time, and a "cuer" or leader at the front of the ballroom tells the dancers, as they dance, what steps to do. As the music plays, and just ahead of the beat, so the dancers have time to respond, the cuer names each dance figure in the choreography
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Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann
Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann
Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann
(Irish pronunciation: [kɔwal̪ˠt̪ˠəsˠ coːl̪ˠt̪ˠoːɾʲiː ˈeːrʲən̪ˠ], meaning "Society of the Musicians of Ireland") is the primary Irish organisation dedicated to the promotion of the music, song, dance and the language of Ireland
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Set Dance
A country dance is any of a large number of social dances of the British Isles in which couples dance together in a figure or "set", each dancer dancing to his or her partner and each couple dancing to the other couples in the set.[1] A set consists most commonly of two or three couples, sometimes four and rarely five or six. Often dancers follow a "caller" who names each change in the figures. Introduced to France and then Germany and Italy in the course of the 17th century, country dances gave rise to the contradanse, one of the significant dance forms in classical music. Introduced to America by French immigrants, it remains popular in the United States as contra dance and had great influence upon Latin American music as contradanza. The Anglais (from the French word meaning "English") or Angloise is another term for the English country dance.[2][3] A Scottish country dance
Scottish country dance
may be termed an Ecossaise
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Gaelic Revival
The Gaelic revival
Gaelic revival
(Irish: Athbheochan na Gaeilge) was the late-nineteenth-century national revival of interest in the Irish language (also known as Gaelic)[1] and Irish Gaelic culture (including folklore, sports, music, arts, etc.). Irish had diminished as a spoken tongue, remaining the main daily language only in isolated rural areas, with English having become the dominant language in the majority of Ireland. Interest in Gaelic culture was evident in the beginning of the nineteenth century with the formation of the Ulster Gaelic Society in 1830, and later in the scholarly works of John O'Donovan and Eugene O'Curry, and the foundation of the Ossianic Society. Concern for spoken Irish led to the formation of the Society for the Preservation of the Irish Language in 1876, and the Gaelic Union in 1880. The latter produced the Gaelic Journal
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Quadrilles
The quadrille is a dance that was fashionable in late 18th- and 19th-century Europe and its colonies. Performed by four couples in a rectangular formation, it is related to American square dancing. The Lancers, a variant of the quadrille, became popular in the late 19th century and was still danced in the 20th century in folk-dance clubs. A derivative found in the Francophone Lesser Antilles
Lesser Antilles
is known as kwadril, and the dance is also still found in Madagascar
Madagascar
and is within old Jamaican / Caribbean culture. The quadrille consists of a chain of four to six contredanses, courtly versions of English country dances that had been taken up at the court of Louis XIV
Louis XIV
and spread across Europe
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Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen); Ulster-Scots: Airlann [ˈɑːrlən]) is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain
Great Britain
to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland
Ireland
is the third-largest island in Europe. Politically, Ireland
Ireland
is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. In 2011, the population of Ireland
Ireland
was about 6.6 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe
Europe
after Great Britain
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Dancing On Dangerous Ground
Dancing on Dangerous Ground is an Irish dance show created by and starring Jean Butler and Colin Dunne. It premiered in London at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane in 1999. The show made its American debut in New York at Radio City Music Hall in 2000.Contents1 Synopsis 2 Departure from the original story 3 Critical reception 4 ReferencesSynopsis[edit] The ensemble and the three main characters are introduced during the surreal prologue: Finn McCool (a non-dancing role played by Tony Kemp), high king of Ireland; Diarmuid (Colin Dunne), captain of the Fianna—Finn's army; and Grania (Jean Butler), Finn's betrothed. The scene fades away and the prologue breaks open into the Court of Finn McCool, where Diarmuid is displayed as the best soldier at court and Finn's devoted and trusted servant. Soon afterwards Grania arrives and is introduced to her fiancé for the first time
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World Irish Dance Association
The World Irish Dance Association (WIDA) is an Irish stepdance organisation founded in 2004. It is based primarily in Europe and the United Kingdom, and offers "open platform" competitions that are open to competitors from all Irish dance organisations.[1]Contents1 History 2 Rules 3 Competitions 4 Qualifications 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] WIDA was founded in January 2004 in Dusseldorf, Germany, to cater to a growing number of Irish dance teachers in the European mainland.[2] The demand for Irish dance which prompted WIDA's establishment in Europe had been driven largely by the success of Irish dance stage shows in the 1990s such as Riverdance.[3] In 2013, WIDA subsumed a number of Irish dance schools in North America previously affiliated with the North American Irish Dance Federation
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Crossroads Dance
The crossroads dance was a type of social event popular in Ireland up to the mid-20th century, in which people would congregate at the large cleared space of a crossroads to dance.[1] In contrast to the later ceili styles, crossroad dances were generally set dancing or solo dancing.[citation needed] The crossroads dance declined in popularity in the mid-20th century, due to rural depopulation, musical recordings, and pressure of the Catholic clergy which resulted in the Public Dance Halls Act of 1935 which restricted all dancing to licensed establishments.[2] In the early 1930s the wooden platforms at crossroads became the focus of standoffs and faction fights between Fianna Fáil and the Blueshirts, with some destroyed by arson.[3] The phrase "comely maidens dancing at the crossroads", a misquotation attributed to Éamon De Valera's 1943 Patrick's Day radio broadcast, has become shorthand for a maudlin yearning for a vanished Irish rural idyll.[3] The name of John Waters' 1991 memoir
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Feis
A Feis (Irish pronunciation: [fʲɛʃ]) or Fèis (Scottish Gaelic pronunciation: [feːʃ]) is a traditional Gaelic arts and culture festival. The plural forms are feiseanna (Irish: [ˈfɛʃənə]) and fèisean (Scottish Gaelic: [ˈfeːʃən]). The term "feis" is commonly used referring to Irish dance
Irish dance
competitions and, in Scotland, to immersive teaching courses, specialising in traditional music and culture
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