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Cedar Of Lebanon
Several, including: Cedrus
Cedrus
elegans Knight[2] Cedrus
Cedrus
libani, commonly known as the Cedar of Lebanon
Lebanon
or Lebanon cedar, is a species of cedar native to the mountains of the Eastern Mediterranean basin. It is an evergreen conifer that can reach 40 m (130 ft) in height
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Forest
A forest is a large area dominated by trees.[1] Hundreds of more precise definitions of forest are used throughout the world, incorporating factors such as tree density, tree height, land use, legal standing and ecological function.[2][3][4] According to the widely used[5][6] Food and Agriculture Organization
Food and Agriculture Organization
definition, forests covered 4 billion hectares (9.9×109 acres) (15 million square miles) or approximately 30 percent of the world's land area in 2006.[4] Forests are the dominant terrestrial ecosystem of Earth, and are distributed across the globe.[7] Forests account for 75% of the gross primary productivity of the Earth's biosphere, and contain 80% of the Earth's plant biomass.[7] Forests at different latitudes and elevations form distinctly different ecozones: boreal forests near the poles, tropical forests near the equator and temperate forests at mid-latitudes
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Turkey
Turkey
Turkey
(Turkish: Türkiye [ˈtyɾcije]), officially the Republic of Turkey
Turkey
(Turkish: Türkiye Cumhuriyeti [ˈtyɾcije d͡ʒumˈhuɾijeti] ( listen)), is a transcontinental country in Eurasia, mainly in Anatolia
Anatolia
in Western Asia, with a smaller portion on the Balkan peninsula in Southeast Europe.[7] Turkey
Turkey
is bordered by eight countries with Greece
Greece
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the northwest; Georgia to the northeast; Armenia, the Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
and Iran
Iran
to the east; and Iraq
Iraq
and Syria
Syria
to the south
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Rhombus
In Euclidean geometry, a rhombus (◊) (plural rhombi or rhombuses) is a simple (non-self-intersecting) quadrilateral whose four sides all have the same length. Another name is equilateral quadrilateral, since equilateral means that all of its sides are equal in length. The rhombus is often called a diamond, after the diamonds suit in playing cards which resembles the projection of an octahedral diamond, or a lozenge, though the former sometimes refers specifically to a rhombus with a 60° angle (see Polyiamond), and the latter sometimes refers specifically to a rhombus with a 45° angle. Every rhombus is a parallelogram and a kite
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Stomata
In botany, a stoma (plural "stomata"), also called a stomate (plural "stomates")[1] (from Greek στόμα, "mouth"[2]), is a pore, found in the epidermis of leaves, stems, and other organs, that facilitates gas exchange. The pore is bordered by a pair of specialized parenchyma cells known as guard cells that are responsible for regulating the size of the stomatal opening. The term is usually used collectively to refer to the entire stomatal complex, consisting of the paired guard cells and the pore itself, which is referred to as the stomatal aperture.[3] Air enters the plant through these openings by gaseous diffusion, and contains carbon dioxide and oxygen, which are used in photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. Oxygen
Oxygen
produced as a by-product of photosynthesis diffuses out to the atmosphere through these same openings
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Sessility (botany)
In botany, sessility (meaning "sitting", used in the sense of "resting on the surface") is a characteristic of plant parts which have no stalk.[1][2] Flowers or leaves are borne directly from the stem or peduncle, and thus lack a petiole or pedicel. The leaves of the vast majority of monocotyledons lack petioles. In addition to these plants, many insects practise sessile nesting practices. For example, Brachygastra scutellaris
Brachygastra scutellaris
will build its nest starting with a sessile initiation onto a tree upon which the primary comb is built
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Rachis
Rachis
Rachis
/ˈreɪkɪs/ is a biological term for a main axis or "shaft" (from the Greek ράχις, backbone, spine[1]).Contents1 In zoology/microbiology 2 In botany 3 See also 4 ReferencesIn zoology/microbiology[edit] In vertebrates a rachis can refer to the series of articulated vertebrae, which encase the spinal cord. In this case the rachis usually forms the supporting axis of the body and is then called the spine or vertebral column. Rachis
Rachis
can also mean the central shaft of pennaceous feathers. In the gonad of the invertebrate nematode C. elegans, a rachis is the central cell-free core or axis of the gonadal arm of both adult males and hermaphrodites where the germ cells have achieved pachytene and are attached to the walls of the gonadal tube
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Coriaceous
This glossary of botanical terms is incomplete; you can help by expanding it: you can also help by adding illustrations that assist an understanding of the terms.Part of a series onScienceFormalFormal logic MathematicsMathematical statistics Theoretical computer scienceGame theory Decision theoryInformation theory Systems theory Control theoryPhysicalPhysicsClassical Modern AppliedTheoretical Experimental ComputationalMechanics(classical analytical continuum fluid solid)Electromagnetism ThermodynamicsMolecular Atomic Nuclear ParticleCondensed matter PlasmaQuantum mechanics (introduction) Quantum field theory Special
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Botanical Name
A botanical name is a formal scientific name conforming to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants
International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants
(ICN) and, if it concerns a plant cultigen, the additional cultivar or Group epithets must conform to the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants (ICNCP). The code of nomenclature covers "all organisms traditionally treated as algae, fungi, or plants, whether fossil or non-fossil, including blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria), chytrids, oomycetes, slime moulds and photosynthetic protists with their taxonomically related non-photosynthetic groups (but excluding Microsporidia)."[1] The purpose of a formal name is to have a single name that is accepted and used worldwide for a particular plant or plant group
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French People
118,000[17][18]Other countries Mexico 60,000[19] Algeria 32,000[10] China 31,000[10] Luxembourg 31,000[10][20] Hong Kong 25,000[21] Netherlands 23,000[10] Senegal 20,000[10] Mauritius 15,000[22] Monaco 10,000[23] Sweden 9,005[24] Austria8,246[25]LanguagesFrench and other languages (Langues d'oïl Occitan Auvergnat Corsican Catalan Franco-Provençal German (Alsatian & Franconian) Dutch (French Flemish) Breton Basque)ReligionPredominantly Roman Catholicism[26] Minority : Protestantism Judaism IslamRelated ethnic groupsCeltic peoples Romance peoples Germanic peoplesThe French (French: Français) are an ethnic group[27][28][29] and nation who are identified with the country of France
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Achille Richard
Achille Richard
Achille Richard
was a French botanist and physician (27 April 1794 in Paris
Paris
– 5 October 1852). He was son of a notable botanist, Louis-Claude Marie Richard (1754–1821). Pharmacist in the French fleet and member of several well-known societies of their time. Achille Richard
Achille Richard
was one of the botanical leaders of his time, and his books are even nowadays valued for their clarity and precision. He entered on 24 February 1834, as member of the French Academy of Sciences (Botanical Section). He was also member of the French National Academy of Medicine. Achille Richard
Achille Richard
studied and described several genera of orchids that take his abbreviation in the generic name, among them Ludisia. The standard author abbreviation A.Rich
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Syria
Coordinates: 35°N 38°E / 35°N 38°E / 35; 38Syrian Arab
Arab
Republic الجمهورية العربية السورية (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-ʻArabīyah as-SūrīyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "حماة الديار" (Arabic) Humat ad-Diyar Guardians of the HomelandCapital and largest city Damascus 33°30′N 36°18′E / 33.500°N 36.300°E / 33.500; 36.300Official languages ArabicEthnic groupsSyrian Arabs Arameans Kurds Turkomans Assyrians Circassians ArmeniansReligion 87% Isl
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Ecotype
In evolutionary ecology, an ecotype,[note 1] sometimes called ecospecies, describes a genetically distinct geographic variety, population or race within a species, which is genotypically adapted to specific environmental conditions. Typically, though ecotypes exhibit phenotypic differences (such as in morphology or physiology) stemming from environmental heterogeneity, they are capable of interbreeding with other geographically adjacent ecotypes without loss of fertility or vigor. [1][2][3][4][5]Contents1 Definition 2 Terminology 3 Range and distribution 4 Examples 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesDefinition[edit] An ecotype is a variant in which the phenotypic differences are too few or too subtle to warrant being classified as a subspecies
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Leaf
A leaf is an organ of a vascular plant and is the principal lateral appendage of the stem.[1] The leaves and stem together form the shoot.[2] Leaves are collectively referred to as foliage, as in "autumn foliage".[3][4]Diagram of a simple leaf.Apex Midvein (Primary vein) Secondary vein. Lamina. Leaf
Leaf
margin Petiole Bud StemAlthough leaves can be seen in many different shapes, sizes and textures, typically a leaf is a thin, dorsiventrally flattened organ, borne above ground and specialized for photosynthesis. In most leaves, the primary photosynthetic tissue, the palisade mesophyll, is located on the upper side of the blade or lamina of the leaf[1] but in some species, including the mature foliage of Eucalyptus,[5] palisade mesophyll is present on both sides and the leaves are said to be isobilateral
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Troodos Mountains
Troodos (sometimes spelled Troödos; Greek: Τρόοδος [ˈtɾooðos]; Turkish: Trodos Dağları) is the largest mountain range in Cyprus, located in roughly the center of the island. Its highest peak is Mount Olympus, also known as Chionistra (Greek: Όλυμπος or Greek: Χιονίστρα), at 1,952 meters, which hosts four ski slopes. The Troodos mountain range stretches across most of the western side of Cyprus. There are many mountain resorts, Byzantine monasteries, and churches on mountain peaks, and nestling in its valleys and mountains are villages clinging to terraced hills. The area has been known since antiquity for its mines, which for centuries supplied copper to the entire Mediterranean. In the Byzantine period it became a centre of Byzantine art, as churches and monasteries[1] were built in the mountains, away from the threatened coastline
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Orthent
In USDA soil taxonomy, orthents are defined as entisols that lack horizon development due to either steep slopes or parent materials that contain no permanent weatherable minerals (such as ironstone). Typically, Orthents are exceedingly shallow soils. They are often referred to as skeletal soils or, in the FAO soil classification, as lithosols. The basic requirement for recognition of an orthent is that any former soil has been either completely removed or so truncated that the diagnostic horizons typical of all orders other than entisols are absent. Most orthents are found in very steep, mountainous regions where erodible material is so rapidly removed by erosion that a permanent covering of deep soil cannot establish itself
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