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Cawton Aston
Cawton Aston (active 1693 – 1733) was an English builder of spinets. He was the seventh and last apprentice of instrument builder John Player (1636 - 1707), and the only one to set up his own business.[1] In 1730 he was living at the Prince’s Arms in New Queen Street in London.[2] Two spinets signed by Aston are currently known; the first is dated 1726 and has the range GG-g΄΄΄ (five octaves). The case is decorated with inlay. The natural keys are covered in bone, and the sharps are made of a “sandwich” of ivory and ebony,[3] sometimes referred to as “skunktail sharps” because of their appearance. The instrument was restored by Arnold Dolmetsch
Arnold Dolmetsch
in 1898; Colonial Williamsburg purchased it in 1960.[4] The second instrument was built in 1733 and also has the range GG-g΄΄΄. The keyboard has ivory-covered naturals[5] and skunktail sharps, just as on the 1726 spinet
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Apprenticeship
An apprenticeship is a system of training a new generation of practitioners of a trade or profession with on-the-job training and often some accompanying study (classroom work and reading). Apprenticeship
Apprenticeship
also enables practitioners to gain a license to practice in a regulated profession. Most of their training is done while working for an employer who helps the apprentices learn their trade or profession, in exchange for their continued labor for an agreed period after they have achieved measurable competencies. Apprenticeships typically last 3 to 7 years
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Arnold Dolmetsch
Eugène Arnold Dolmetsch
Arnold Dolmetsch
(24 February 1858 – 28 February 1940), was a French-born musician and instrument maker who spent much of his working life in England and established an instrument-making workshop in Haslemere, Surrey. He was a leading figure in the 20th-century revival of interest in early music.Contents1 Early life 2 The early music revival 3 Dolmetsch family 4 References 5 See also 6 External linksEarly life[edit] The Dolmetsch family was originally of Bohemian origin, but (Eugène) Arnold Dolmetsch, the son of Rudolph Arnold Dolmetsch
Arnold Dolmetsch
and his wife Marie Zélie (née Guillouard) was born at Le Mans, France, where the family had established a piano-making business
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Colonial Williamsburg
Colonial Williamsburg is a living-history museum and private foundation presenting part of an historic district in the city of Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. Colonial Williamsburg's 301-acre (122 ha) Historic Area includes buildings from the 18th century (during part of which the city was the capital of Colonial Virginia), as well as 17th-century, 19th-century, and Colonial Revival structures, as well as more recent reconstructions. The Historic Area is an interpretation of a colonial American city, with exhibits of dozens of restored or re-created buildings related to its colonial and American Revolutionary War
American Revolutionary War
history.[citation needed] Colonial Williamsburg's Historic Area's combination of restoration and re-creation of parts of the colonial town's three main thoroughfares and their connecting side streets attempts to suggest the atmosphere and the circumstances of 18th-century Americans
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Short Octave
The short octave was a method of assigning notes to keys in early keyboard instruments (harpsichord, clavichord, organ), for the purpose of giving the instrument an extended range in the bass range. The rationale behind this system was that the low notes F♯ and G♯ are seldom needed in early music. Deep bass notes typically form the root of the chord, and F♯ and G♯ chords were seldom used at this time. In contrast, low C and D, both roots of very common chords, are sorely missed if a harpsichord with lowest key E is tuned to match the keyboard layout
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Spinet
A spinet is a smaller type of harpsichord or other keyboard instrument, such as a piano or organ.Contents1 Spinets as harpsichords1.1 History 1.2 Other uses of "spinet" for harpsichords 1.3 Nomenclature2 Spinets as pianos2.1 History3 Spinets as organs 4 Notes 5 References5.1 Harpsichord
Harpsichord
spinet 5.2 Piano
Piano
spinet6 External linksSpinets as harpsichords[edit]Domenico Scarlatti: Sonata in F Minor K.69Performed on a spinet by Ulrich MetznerProblems playing this file? See media help.When the term spinet is used to designate a harpsichord, typically what is meant is the bentside spinet, described in this section. For other uses, see below. The bentside spinet shares most of its characteristics with the full-size instrument, including action, soundboard, and case construction
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Cawton Aston
Cawton Aston (active 1693 – 1733) was an English builder of spinets. He was the seventh and last apprentice of instrument builder John Player (1636 - 1707), and the only one to set up his own business.[1] In 1730 he was living at the Prince’s Arms in New Queen Street in London.[2] Two spinets signed by Aston are currently known; the first is dated 1726 and has the range GG-g΄΄΄ (five octaves). The case is decorated with inlay. The natural keys are covered in bone, and the sharps are made of a “sandwich” of ivory and ebony,[3] sometimes referred to as “skunktail sharps” because of their appearance. The instrument was restored by Arnold Dolmetsch
Arnold Dolmetsch
in 1898; Colonial Williamsburg purchased it in 1960.[4] The second instrument was built in 1733 and also has the range GG-g΄΄΄. The keyboard has ivory-covered naturals[5] and skunktail sharps, just as on the 1726 spinet
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