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Category:Argentine Society
This category has the following 13 subcategories, out of 13 total. The following 9 pages are in this category, out of 9 total. This list may not reflect recent changes (learn more).

Stereotypes Of Argentines
Stereotypes of Argentines are generalizations about Argentines that do not reflect reality. Stereotypes associated with Argentines vary from country to country depending on the prevalent stereotype in each culture. [1][2] In Brazil, Chile and Uruguay, Argentines are stereotyped as arrogant, proud, narcissistic and racist.[3][4][5][6] To this Argentines are also known for being gossipy, full of grandeur, liars (chantas), envious, quick and exaggerated in Uruguay.[7]
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Universal Allocation Per Child
Universal Allocation Per Child (Spanish: Asignación universal por hijo) is a social security program in Argentina. It pays a monthly subsidy to families for each child under 18 or disabled. Despite the name, it is not yet a universal program, and currently applies only to families who do not have a regular reported income. A plan is in place to enlarge the scope of the program.[1][2] It was established in 2009 by a Necessity and Urgency Decree, signed by president Cristina Fernández de Kirchner. A conditional cash transfer programme, eligibility for the scheme was focused on families without formal employment and earning less than the minimum wage who ensured their children attended school, received vaccines and underwent health checks.[3] By 2013 it covered over two million poor families,[4] and by 2015 it covered 29 percent of all Argentinian children
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Human Rights In Argentina
The history of human rights in Argentina is affected by the Dirty War and its aftermath. The Dirty War, a civic-military dictatorship comprising state-sponsored violence against Argentine citizenry from roughly 1976 to 1983, carried out primarily by Jorge Rafael Videla's military government. However, the human rights situation in Argentina has improved since. According to the Nunca Más report issued by the National Commission on the Disappearance of Persons (CONADEP) in 1984, about 9,000 people had "disappeared" between 1976 and 1983. According to a secret cable from DINA (Chilean secret police) in Buenos Aires, an estimate by the Argentine 601st Intelligence Battalion in mid-July 1978, which started counting victims in 1975, gave the figure of 22,000 persons. This estimate was first published by John Dinges in 2004.[1] Estimates by human rights organizations were up to 30,000
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