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Castle Garden
Castle Clinton
Castle Clinton
or Fort
Fort
Clinton, previously known as Castle Garden, is a circular sandstone fort now located in Battery Park, in Manhattan, New York City. It is perhaps best remembered as America's first immigration station (predating Ellis Island), where more than 8 million people arrived in the United States from 1855 to 1890. Over its active life, it has also functioned as a beer garden, exhibition hall, theater, and public aquarium, and currently is a national monument.Contents1 Historic use 2 19th century 3 Immigration holding center 4 20th century to present 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistoric use[edit] Castle Clinton
Castle Clinton
stands approximately two blocks west of where Fort Amsterdam was built in 1626, when New York City
New York City
was known by the Dutch name New Amsterdam. Construction began in 1808 and was completed in 1811
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U. S. Government
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Promenade
An esplanade or promenade is a long, open, level area, usually next to a river or large body of water, where people may walk. The historical definition of esplanade was a large, open, level area outside fortress or city walls to provide clear fields of fire for the fortress's guns. In modern usage the space allows people to walk for recreational purposes; esplanades are often on sea fronts, and allow walking whatever the state of the tide, without having to walk on the beach. Esplanades became popular in Victorian times when it was fashionable to visit seaside resorts. A promenade, often abbreviated to '(the) prom', was an area where people – couples and families especially – would go to walk for a while in order to 'be seen' and be considered part of 'society'. In North America, esplanade has another meaning, being also a median (strip of raised land) dividing a roadway or boulevard. Sometimes they are just strips of grass, or some may have gardens and trees
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War Of 1812
2,200–3,721 killed in action[4]4,505 wounded est. 15,000 died from all causes[b] 4,000 slaves freed [5] 20,000 captured[6][7] 8 frigates captured or burned 278 privateers captured 1,400 merchant ships captured British Empire: 1,160 [8]–1,960 killed[1][c] in action3,679+ wounded 10,000 died from all causes[1][d] 4 frigates captured ~1,344 merchant ships captured (373 recaptured)[4] 15,500 captured Indian allies:10,000 dead from all causes (warriors and civilians)[1][e]Unknown captured * Some militias operated in only their own regions.  † Killed in action  ‡ A locally raised coastal protection and semi-naval force on the Great Lakes vteSt
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Land Reclamation
Land reclamation, usually known as reclamation, and also known as land fill (not to be confused with a landfill), is the process of creating new land from ocean, riverbeds, or lake beds. The land reclaimed is known as reclamation ground or land fill. In a number of other jurisdictions, including parts of the United States,[1] the term "reclamation" can refer to returning disturbed lands to an improved state
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Samuel Waugh
Samuel Bell Waugh (1814 in New Wilmington, Pennsylvania
New Wilmington, Pennsylvania
– 1885, in Janesville, Wisconsin) was a 19th-century American portrait, landscape, and moving panorama painter. His portrait subjects included President Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
and Ulysses S. Grant.Contents1 Biography 2 Family 3 Recognition 4 Gallery 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] He was born in 1814 in New Wilmington, Pennsylvania, then part of the Mercer County, Pennsylvania. According to some reports, his father, James Waugh, was a pioneer-settler in New Wilmington where he ran the first general store.[1] Little is known about Samuel's early life and education. It was suggested that he worked in a paint shop in Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
and also took painting lessons from J. R. Smith, who advertised himself as the "Scenic Artist of the Pittsburgh Theater".[2] He joined his brother John in Toronto in 1833
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Jenny Lind
Johanna Maria Lind (6 October 1820 – 2 November 1887), better known as Jenny Lind, was a Swedish opera singer, often known as the "Swedish Nightingale". One of the most highly regarded singers of the 19th century, she performed in soprano roles in opera in Sweden and across Europe, and undertook an extraordinarily popular concert tour of America beginning in 1850. She was a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Music from 1840. Lind became famous after her performance in Der Freischütz
Der Freischütz
in Sweden in 1838. Within a few years, she had suffered vocal damage, but the singing teacher Manuel García saved her voice. She was in great demand in opera roles throughout Sweden and northern Europe during the 1840s, and was closely associated with Felix Mendelssohn. After two acclaimed seasons in London, she announced her retirement from opera at the age of 29. In 1850, Lind went to America at the invitation of the showman P. T. Barnum
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Currier And Ives
Currier and Ives
Currier and Ives
was a successful American printmaking firm headed by Nathaniel Currier
Nathaniel Currier
(1813–1888) and James Merritt Ives
James Merritt Ives
(1824–1895) based in New York City from 1834 to 1907. The prolific firm produced prints from paintings by fine artists as black and white lithographs that were hand colored
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Mayor Of New York City
The Mayor
Mayor
of the City of New York is head of the executive branch of New York City's government. The mayor's office administers all city services, public property, police and fire protection, most public agencies, and enforces all city, state and federal laws within New York City. The budget, overseen by the mayor's Office of Management and Budget, is the largest municipal budget in the United States
United States
at $82 billion a year.[1] The city employs 325,000 people, spends about $21 billion to educate more than 1.1 million students (the largest public school system in the United States), levies $27 billion in taxes, and receives $14 billion from the state and federal governments. The mayor's office is located in New York City
New York City
Hall; it has jurisdiction over all five boroughs of New York City: Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Staten Island
Staten Island
and Queens
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DeWitt Clinton
DeWitt Clinton
DeWitt Clinton
(March 2, 1769 – February 11, 1828) was an American politician and naturalist who served as a United States Senator, Mayor of New York City
Mayor of New York City
and sixth Governor of New York. In this last capacity, he was largely responsible for the construction of the Erie Canal.[1] Clinton was a major candidate for the American presidency in the election of 1812, challenging incumbent James Madison. A nephew of long-time New York Governor George Clinton, DeWitt Clinton served as his uncle's secretary before launching his own political career. As a Democratic-Republican, Clinton won election to the New York State Legislature in 1798 before briefly serving as a U.S. Senator. Returning to New York, Clinton served three terms as Mayor of New York City and also won election as the Lieutenant Governor of New York
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Governor Of New York
See also:State Treasurer: abolished in 1926LegislatureState SenatePresident Kathy Hochul
Kathy Hochul
(D)Majority leader John J
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Restaurant
A restaurant (/ˈrɛstərənt/ or /ˈrɛstərɒnt/; French: [ʀɛs.to.ʁɑ̃] ( listen)), or an eatery, is a business which prepares and serves food and drinks to customers in exchange for money. Meals are generally served and eaten on the premises, but many restaurants also offer take-out and food delivery services, and some offer only take-out and delivery. Restaurants vary greatly in appearance and offerings, including a wide variety of cuisines and service models ranging from inexpensive fast food restaurants and cafeterias to mid-priced family restaurants, to high-priced luxury establishments. In Western countries, most mid- to high-range restaurants serve alcoholic beverages such as beer and wine
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Governors Island
Governors Island
Governors Island
is a 172-acre (70 ha) island in New York Harbor, approximately 800 yards (732 m) from the southern tip of Manhattan Island
Manhattan Island
and separated from Brooklyn
Brooklyn
by Buttermilk Channel, approximately 400 yards (366 m). It is part of the borough of Manhattan
Manhattan
in New York City. The National Park Service
National Park Service
administers a small portion of the north of the island as the Governors Island National Monument, while the Trust for Governors Island
Governors Island
operates the remaining 150 acres, including 52 historic buildings
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Opera House
An opera house is a theatre building used for opera performances that consists of a stage, an orchestra pit, audience seating, and backstage facilities for costumes and set building. While some venues are constructed specifically for operas, other opera houses are part of larger performing arts centers. Indeed the term opera house itself is often used as a term of prestige for any large performing-arts center.Contents1 History 2 Features2.1 Acoustic enhancement with loudspeakers3 Other uses of the term 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]Opera- Theatre
Theatre
of Metz, built by benefactor Duke de Belle-Isle during the 18th century, it is the oldest opera house working in FranceThe first public opera house was the Teatro San Cassiano
Teatro San Cassiano
in Venice, opened in 1637
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Theater (structure)
A theater, theatre or playhouse, is a structure where theatrical works or plays are performed, or other performances such as musical concerts may be produced. While a theater is not required for performance (as in environmental theater or street theater), a theater serves to define the performance and audience spaces. The facility is traditionally organized to provide support areas for performers, the technical crew and the audience members. There are as many types of theaters as there are types of performance. Theaters may be built specifically for a certain types of productions, they may serve for more general performance needs or they may be adapted or converted for use as a theater. They may range from open-air amphitheaters to ornate, cathedral-like structures to simple, undecorated rooms or black box theaters
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