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Casio Edifice
Edifice are a brand of luxury watches manufactured by the Japanese electronics company Casio. Technology[edit] Edifice watches range from basic chronograph to more advanced models with more computerized movements. Many Edifice watches utilize Tough Solar, Casio's name for light chargeable batteries. More advanced models are "Waveceptors" and can calibrate themselves with atomic clocks via radio waves. See also[edit]Casio Casio
Casio
OceanusExternal links[edit] Casio
Casio
Edificev t eCasioProductsCalculatorsGraphic calculators V.P.A.M
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Watch
A watch is a timepiece intended to be carried or worn by a person. It is designed to keep working despite the motions caused by the person's activities. A wristwatch is designed to be worn around the wrist, attached by a watch strap or other type of bracelet. A pocket watch is designed for a person to carry in a pocket. Watches progressed in the 17th century from spring-powered clocks, which appeared as early as the 14th century. During most of its history the watch was a mechanical device, driven by clockwork, powered by winding a mainspring, and keeping time with an oscillating balance wheel. In the 1960s the electronic quartz watch was invented, which was powered by a battery and kept time with a vibrating quartz crystal. By the 1980s the quartz watch had taken over most of the market from the mechanical watch. Today most watches that are inexpensive and medium-priced, used mainly for timekeeping, have quartz movements
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Chronograph
A chronograph is a specific type of watch that is used as a stopwatch combined with a display watch. A basic chronograph has an independent sweep second hand; it can be started, stopped, and returned to zero by successive pressure on the stem. More complex chronographs use additional complications and can have multiple independent hands to measure seconds, minutes, hours and even tenths of a second. In addition, many modern chronographs use moveable bezels as tachymeters for rapid calculations of speed or distance. Louis Moinet
Louis Moinet
invented the chronograph in 1816 for use in tracking astronomical objects.[1][2] Chronographs were also used heavily in artillery fire in the mid to late 1800s
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Solar Power
Solar power
Solar power
is the conversion of energy from sunlight into electricity, either directly using photovoltaics (PV), indirectly using concentrated solar power, or a combination. Concentrated solar power systems use lenses or mirrors and tracking systems to focus a large area of sunlight into a small beam. Photovoltaic
Photovoltaic
cells convert light into an electric current using the photovoltaic effect.[1] Photovoltaics
Photovoltaics
were initially solely used as a source of electricity for small and medium-sized applications, from the calculator powered by a single solar cell to remote homes powered by an off-grid rooftop PV system. Commercial concentrated solar power plants were first developed in the 1980s
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Radio Clock
A radio clock or radio-controlled clock (RCC) is a clock that is automatically synchronized by a time code transmitted by a radio transmitter connected to a time standard such as an atomic clock. Such a clock may be synchronized to the time sent by a single transmitter, such as many national or regional time transmitters, or may use multiple transmitters, like the Global Positioning System. Such systems may be used to automatically set clocks or for any purpose where accurate time is needed. One common style of radio-controlled clock uses time signals transmitted by dedicated terrestrial longwave radio transmitters, which emit a time code that can be demodulated and displayed by the radio controlled clock. The radio controlled clock will contain an accurate time base oscillator to maintain timekeeping if the radio signal is momentarily unavailable. Other radio controlled clocks use the time signals transmitted by dedicated transmitters in the shortwave bands
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Atomic Clock
An atomic clock is a clock device that uses an electron transition frequency in the microwave, optical, or ultraviolet region[2] of the electromagnetic spectrum of atoms as a frequency standard for its timekeeping element. Atomic clocks are the most accurate time and frequency standards known, and are used as primary standards for international time distribution services, to control the wave frequency of television broadcasts, and in global navigation satellite systems such as GPS. The principle of operation of an atomic clock is based on atomic physics; it uses the microwave signal that electrons in atoms emit when they change energy levels. Early atomic clocks were based on masers at room temperature. Currently, the most accurate atomic clocks first cool the atoms to near absolute zero temperature by slowing them with lasers and probing them in atomic fountains in a microwave-filled cavity
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Radio
Radio
Radio
is the technology of using radio waves to carry information, such as sound, by systematically modulating properties of electromagnetic energy waves transmitted through space, such as their amplitude, frequency, phase, or pulse width.[n 1] When radio waves strike an electrical conductor, the oscillating fields induce an alternating current in the conductor. The information in the waves can be extracted and transformed back into its original form. Radio
Radio
systems need a transmitter to modulate (change) some property of the energy produced to impress a signal on it, for example using amplitude modulation or angle modulation (which can be frequency modulation or phase modulation). Radio
Radio
systems also need an antenna to convert electric currents into radio waves, and radio waves into an electric current. An antenna can be used for both transmitting and receiving
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Casio Digital Diary
An electronic organizer (or electric organizer) is a small calculator-sized computer, often with an in-built diary application but few other functions such as an address book and calendar
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Casio DW-5600E
G-Shock
G-Shock
is a line of watches manufactured by Casio, designed to resist mechanical shock and vibration
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Casio AZ-1
The Casio
Casio
AZ-1 is a polyphonic MIDI
MIDI
keyboard in the form factor of a keytar. It has a distinctive white body with a long neck, with detailing in a pale blue. This instrument is designed to be played, with the aid of a shoulder strap, in an approximation of an electric guitar. As were many keytars, it was geared towards keyboardists who wanted greater freedom of movement during performances.Contents1 Features 2 History2.1 1996 2.2 2000Features[edit] The AZ-1 features 2 switches, 2 wheels, and 1 slider that transmit assignable MIDI
MIDI
continuous controller data as the user deems fit. It has a pitch wheel for shifting the sound up or down fractions of a note. Other non-definable controllers include Solo, Sustain, Portamento and a three position octave slider. The AZ-1 has one MIDI output, and can simultaneously transmit on two selectable midi channels
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Casiotone
Casiotone
Casiotone
refers to a series of home electronic keyboards released by Casio
Casio
Computer Co. in the early 1980s. These first keyboards used a sound synthesis technique known as vowel-consonant synthesis to approximate the sounds of other instruments (albeit not very accurately). Most Casiotone
Casiotone
keyboards were small, with miniature keys designed for children's fingers, and were not intended for use by professional musicians; they usually contained a rhythm generator, with several user-selectable rhythm patterns, and often the means to automatically play accompaniments. While the name "Casiotone" disappeared from Casio's new keyboard catalog when more accurate synthesis technologies became prevalent, their low cost and abundance made them fairly common fixtures in garage rock bands
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Privia
The Privia
Privia
is a line of budget digital pianos manufactured by Casio. They have 4-layer stereo piano samples which provides articulated dynamics using Casio's Linear Morphing sound technology and up to 256 notes of polyphony, depending on model
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Zanzithophone
The Digital Horn was an instrument produced by Casio
Casio
in the mid 1980s.Contents1 Models 2 MIDI
MIDI
implementation 3 Use in recording 4 References in literature 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksModels[edit] The original model was presented as either the DH-100 (silver) or DH-200 (black). A later model, DH-280, was the same instrument with an added "accompaniment module.' This module was carried into the DH-800: a cartridge insert provided four pre-recorded songs. These songs consisted of When the Saints go Marching In,Air on the (sic) G String,Chopin's Nocturne, and I Lost the DOH in my Clarinet, each of which could be played with or without melody. The module also provided sixteen standard rhythms.[1] Each model has six built in synthesized sounds; saxophone, trumpet, synth-reed, oboe, clarinet, and flute. The tones produced are audibly more 'electronic' than the tones of the real instruments named
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PhotoLoader
PhotoLoader
PhotoLoader
is a program by Casio
Casio
that runs on Windows systems (above Windows 95
Windows 95
up to Windows XP, but not Windows 8[1]) designed primarily for Casio
Casio
digital cameras using USB
USB
connections
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G-Shock
G-Shock
G-Shock
is a line of watches manufactured by Casio, designed to resist mechanical shock and vibration
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Casio DW-5000C
G-Shock
G-Shock
is a line of watches manufactured by Casio, designed to resist mechanical shock and vibration
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