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Casa Loma
Casa Loma
Casa Loma
(Spanish for Hill House) is a Gothic Revival
Gothic Revival
style house and gardens in midtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada, that is now a museum and landmark. It was built as a residence for financier [[Henry PellattSir Henry Mill Pellatt Casa Loma
Casa Loma
was constructed from 1911 to 1914. The architect was E. J. Lennox,[1] who designed several other city landmarks. Casa Loma
Casa Loma
sits at an elevation of 140 metres (460 ft) above sea level.[2] Due to its unique architectural character in Toronto, Casa Loma
Casa Loma
has been a popular filming location for movies and television
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Grinling Gibbons
Grinling Gibbons
Grinling Gibbons
(4 April 1648 – 3 August 1721) was a Dutch-British sculptor and wood carver known for his work in England, including Windsor Castle
Windsor Castle
and Hampton Court Palace, St. Paul's Cathedral and other London
London
churches, Petworth House
Petworth House
and other country houses, Trinity College Oxford and Trinity College Cambridge. Gibbons was born and educated in Holland of English parents,[1] his father being a merchant. He was a member of the Drapers' Company
Drapers' Company
of London. He is widely regarded as the finest wood carver working in England, and the only one whose name is widely known among the general public
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Secret Passage
Secret passages, also commonly referred to as hidden passages or secret tunnels, are hidden routes used for stealthy travel, escape, or movement of people and goods. Such passageways are sometimes inside buildings leading to secret rooms. Others allow occupants to enter or exit buildings without being seen. Hidden passages and secret rooms have been built in castles and houses owned by heads of state, wealthy individuals and criminals. These passages have helped besieged rulers to escape from their attackers, including Pope Alexander VI
Pope Alexander VI
in 1494, Pope Clement VII
Pope Clement VII
in 1527 and Marie Antoinette
Marie Antoinette
in 1789
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U-boat
U-boat
U-boat
is an anglicised version of the German word U-Boot [ˈuːboːt] ( listen), a shortening of Unterseeboot, literally "undersea boat".[1] While the German term refers to any submarine, the English one (in common with several other languages) refers specifically to military submarines operated by Germany, particularly in the First and Second World Wars. Although at times they were efficient fleet weapons against enemy naval warships, they were most effectively used in an economic warfare role (commerce raiding) and enforcing a naval blockade against enemy shipping
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Container Gardening
Container gardening or pot gardening is the practice of growing plants, including edible plants, exclusively in containers instead of planting them in the ground.[1] A container in gardening is a small, enclosed and usually portable object used for displaying live flowers or plants. It may take the form of a pot, box, tub, pot, basket, tin, barrel or hanging basket.Contents1 Methods 2 Planting 3 Re-potting 4 Advantages 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksMethods[edit] Pots, traditionally made of terracotta but now more commonly plastic, and window boxes have been the most commonly seen. Small pots are commonly called flowerpots.[2] In some cases, this method of growing is used for ornamental purposes. This method is also useful in areas where the soil or climate is unsuitable for the plant or crop in question. Using a container is also generally necessary for houseplants
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Kiwanis Club
Kiwanis
Kiwanis
International (/kɪˈwɑːnɪs/ ki-WAH-niss) is an international service club founded in 1915 in Detroit, Michigan. It is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, United States, and is found in more than 80 nations and geographic areas. Since 1987, the organization also accepts women as members. Membership in Kiwanis
Kiwanis
and its family of clubs is more than 600,000 members. Each year, Kiwanis clubs raise more than US$100 million and report more than 18.5 million volunteer hours to strengthen communities and serve children.[4] Kiwanis
Kiwanis
International is a volunteer-led organization headed by a Board of Trustees consisting of 19 members: 15 trustees, four elected officers, and an executive director. The trustees serve three-year terms, with five trustees elected each year
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Ghost
In folklore, a ghost (sometimes known as an apparition, haunt, phantom, poltergeist, shade, specter or spectre, spirit, spook, and wraith) is the soul or spirit of a dead person or animal that can appear to the living. In ghostlore, descriptions of ghosts vary widely from an invisible presence to translucent or barely visible wispy shapes, to realistic, lifelike visions. The deliberate attempt to contact the spirit of a deceased person is known as necromancy, or in spiritism as a séance. The belief in the existence of an afterlife, as well as manifestations of the spirits of the dead is widespread, dating back to animism or ancestor worship in pre-literate cultures. Certain religious practices—funeral rites, exorcisms, and some practices of spiritualism and ritual magic—are specifically designed to rest the spirits of the dead
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Carriage Room
A carriage house, also called a remise or coach house, is an outbuilding which was originally built to house horse-drawn carriages and the related tack.[1] In Great Britain
Great Britain
the farm building was called a cart shed. These typically were open fronted, single story buildings, with the roof supported by regularly spaced pillars.[2] They often face away from the farmyard and may be found close to the stables and roadways, giving direct access to the fields.[3][4]Contents1 Current usages 2 Designs 3 Other modern uses 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksCurrent usages[edit] Horse-drawn carriages are much less common now than in previous times, creating very little need in the modern world for true carriage houses. Accordingly, many carriage houses have been modified to other uses such as secondary suites, guest houses, automobile garages, offices, workshops, retail shops, bars, restaurants, or storage buildings
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CFRB
CFRB
CFRB
is an AM radio clear-channel station in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, broadcasting a news/talk at 1010 kHz, with a shortwave radio simulcast on CFRX
CFRX
at 6.07 MHz on the 49m band. CFRB's studios are located in the Entertainment District at 250 Richmond Street West, a building which is adjacent to 299 Queen Street West, while its 4-tower transmitter array is located in the Clarkson neighbourhood of Mississauga.Contents1 History 2 Transmitter 3 Programming 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Founded in 1927, CFRB
CFRB
was not Toronto's very first broadcaster, but it is the city's oldest broadcaster still operating today. It has also retained its original call letters from 1927 to the present
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Swing Era
The swing era (also frequently referred to as the "big band era") was the period of time (1935–1946) when big band swing music was the most popular music in the United States. Though this was its most popular period, the music had actually been around since the late 1920s and early 1930s, being played by black bands led by such artists as Duke Ellington, Jimmie Lunceford, Bennie Moten, Cab Calloway, Earl Hines, and Fletcher Henderson, and white bands from the 1920s led by the likes of Jean Goldkette, Russ Morgan
Russ Morgan
and Isham Jones
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Mansion
A mansion is a large dwelling house. The word itself derives through Old French
Old French
from the Latin
Latin
word mansio "dwelling", an abstract noun derived from the verb manere "to dwell". The English word "manse" originally defined a property large enough for the parish priest to maintain himself, but a mansion is no longer self-sustaining in this way (compare a Roman or medieval villa). 'Manor' comes from the same root—territorial holdings granted to a lord who would remain there—hence it is easy to see how the word 'Mansion' came to have its meaning.Contents1 History 2 19th century development 3 Latin
Latin
America 4 Modern mansions 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Within an ancient Roman city, aristocratic or just wealthy dwellings might be very extensive, and luxurious
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Line 1 Yonge–University
Line 1 Yonge–University[3] is the oldest and busiest line of the Toronto subway
Toronto subway
in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is operated by the Toronto
Toronto
Transit Commission, has 38 stations[3] and is 38.8 km (24.1 mi) in length.[2] It opened as the "Yonge subway" in 1954 as Canada's first underground passenger rail line, and was extended multiple times between 1963 and 2017. Averaging over 736,000 riders per weekday, Line 1 is the busiest rapid transit line in Canada, and one of the busiest lines in North America.[4] The eastern portion of the line runs under Yonge Street
Yonge Street
from its northeastern terminus at Finch Avenue
Finch Avenue
to Toronto
Toronto
Union Station, connecting with Line 4 Sheppard
Line 4 Sheppard
at Sheppard–Yonge and Line 2 Bloor–Danforth at Bloor–Yonge
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Prohibition In The United States
Prohibition
Prohibition
in the United States was a nationwide constitutional ban on the production, importation, transportation, and sale of alcoholic beverages from 1920 to 1933. During the 19th century, alcoholism, family violence, and saloon-based political corruption prompted activists, led by pietistic Protestants, to end the alcoholic beverage trade to cure the ill society and weaken the political opposition. One result was that many communities in the late 19th and early 20th centuries introduced alcohol prohibition, with the subsequent enforcement in law becoming a hotly debated issue. Prohibition
Prohibition
supporters, called "drys", presented it as a victory for public morals and health. Promoted by the "dry" crusaders, the movement was led by pietistic Protestants and social Progressives
Progressives
in the Prohibition, Democratic, and Republican parties
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Commanding Officer
The commanding officer (CO) or, if the incumbent is a general officer, commanding general (CG), is the officer in command of a military unit. The commanding officer has ultimate authority over the unit, and is usually given wide latitude to run the unit as they see fit, within the bounds of military law. In this respect, commanding officers have significant responsibilities (for example, the use of force, finances, equipment, the Geneva Conventions), duties (to higher authority, mission effectiveness, duty of care to personnel), and powers (for example, discipline and punishment of personnel within certain limits of military law). In some countries, commanding officers may be of any commissioned rank. Usually, there are more officers than command positions available, and time spent in command is generally a key aspect of promotion, so the role of commanding officer is highly valued
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Rifleman
A rifleman is an infantry soldier armed with a rifled long gun. Although the rifleman role had its origin with 16th century hand cannoneers and 17th century musketeers, the term originated in the 18th century with the introduction of the rifled musket. By the mid-19th century, entire regiments of riflemen were formed and became the mainstay of all standard infantry, and rifleman became a generic term for any common infantryman.Contents1 History 2 Rank 3 Modern tactics3.1 Modern Rifleman4 Rifleman
Rifleman
in different countries4.1 Australia 4.2 India 4.3 Israel 4.4 Rhodesia 4.5 United Kingdom 4.6 United States5 See also 6 References and notesHistory[edit] Units of musketeers were originally developed to support units of pikemen. As firearms became more effective and widely used, the composition of these pike-and-musket units changed, with pikemen eventually becoming support units to the musketeers, particularly against cavalry
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Louis XVI Style
Louis XVI style, also called Louis Seize, is a style of architecture, furniture, decoration and art which developed in France during the 19-year reign of Louis XVI (1774–1793), just before the French Revolution. It saw the final phase of the baroque style as well as the birth of French neoclassicism. The style was a reaction against the elaborate ornament of the preceding baroque period. It was inspired in part by the discoveries of ancient Roman paintings, sculpture and architecture in Herculaneum
Herculaneum
and Pompeii. Its features included the straight column, the simplicity of the post-and-lintel, the architrave of the Greek temple
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