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Carlos Salinas
Carlos Salinas de Gortari
Carlos Salinas de Gortari
(Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkarlos saˈlinaz ðe ɣorˈtaɾi]) (born 3 April 1948) is a Mexican economist and politician affiliated with the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) who served as President of Mexico
President of Mexico
from 1988 to 1994. Earlier in his career he worked in the Budget Secretariat eventually becoming Secretary
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Spanish Naming Customs
Spanish naming customs
Spanish naming customs
are historical traditions for naming children practised in Spain. According to these customs, a person's name consists of a given name (simple or composite) followed by two family names (surnames). The first surname is usually the father's first surname, and the second the mother's first surname. In recent years, the order of the surnames can be decided at birth. Often, the practice is to use one given name and the first surname only (e.g. Miguel de Unamuno), with the full name being used in legal, formal, and documentary matters, or for disambiguation when the first surname is very common (e.g. Federico García Lorca). [1]. In these cases, it is common to use only the second surname, as in “Lorca” or “Zapatero”
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Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
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Chiapas
^ a. By the will of the people of Chiapas
Chiapas
expressed by direct vote for incorporation into the Federation. ^ b. The state's GDP
GDP
was 153,062,117 thousand of pesos in 2008,[7] amount corresponding to 11,957,977.89 thousand of dollars, being a dollar worth 12.80 pesos (value of June 3, 2010).[8] Chiapas
Chiapas
(Spanish pronunciation: [ˈtʃjapas] ( listen)), officially the Free and Sovereign State of Chiapas
Chiapas
(Spanish: Estado Libre y Soberano de Chiapas), is one of the 31 states that with Mexico
Mexico
City make up the 32 federal entities of Mexico. It is divided into 124 municipalities as of September 2017[9][10] and its capital city is Tuxtla Gutiérrez. Other important population centers in Chiapas
Chiapas
include Ocosingo, Tapachula, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Comitán
Comitán
and Arriaga
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National Human Rights Commission (Mexico)
The 'National Human Rights Commission (Spanish: Comisión Nacional de los Derechos Humanos; CNDH) is the national human rights institution (NHRI) accredited at the United Nations
United Nations
with 'A' status by the International Co-ordinating Committee of NHRIs (the ICC). It is a member of the Network of National Institutions in the Americas, one of four regional groups within the ICC. The Commission is a public institution that enjoys judicial, organizational and functional autonomy from the federal government
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Anticlericalism
Anti-clericalism
Anti-clericalism
is opposition to religious authority, typically in social or political matters. Historical anti-clericalism has mainly been opposed to the influence of Roman Catholicism. Anti-clericalism is related to secularism, which seeks to remove the church from all aspects of public and political life, and its involvement in the everyday life of the citizen.[1] Some have opposed clergy on the basis of moral corruption, institutional issues and/or disagreements in religious interpretation, such as during the Protestant Reformation. Anti-clericalism
Anti-clericalism
became extremely violent during the French Revolution
French Revolution
because revolutionaries believed the church had played a pivotal role in the systems of oppression which led to it
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Carlos Loret De Mola
Carlos Loret de Mola
Carlos Loret de Mola
Álvarez (born October 17, 1976 in Mérida, Yucatán) is a Mexican journalist.[1] He has a bachelor's degree in Economics for the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México
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Congress Of The Union
The Congress of the Union
Congress of the Union
(Spanish: Congreso de la Unión), formally known as the General Congress of the United Mexican States (Congreso General de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos), is the bicameral legislature of the federal government of Mexico
Mexico
consisting of two chambers: the Senate of the Republic and the Chamber of Deputies. The Congress of the Union
Congress of the Union
meets in Mexico City
Mexico City
and consists of 628 members: 500 deputies and 128 senators.Contents1 Structure 2 Elections 3 Permanent Committee 4 Term4.1 Reelection5 See also 6 References 7 External linksStructure[edit] Main articles: Senate of the Republic (Mexico)
Senate of the Republic (Mexico)
and Chamber of Deputies (Mexico) The Congress is a bicameral body, consisting of two chambers: Senate of the Republic and the Chamber of Deputies
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1971 Pan American Games
The 6th Pan American Games
Pan American Games
were held in Cali, Colombia, from July 30 to August 13, 1971.[1] (One source dates the Games from July 25 to August 8.)[2] A total of 2,935 athletes from 32 countries participated in seventeen sports
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Chespirito
Roberto Gómez Bolaños (21 February 1929 – 28 November 2014),[3] more commonly known by his stage name Chespirito, or "Little Shakespeare"[4] was a Mexican screenwriter, actor, comedian, film director, television director, playwright, songwriter, and author. He is widely regarded as the most important Spanish-language humorist of all time.[5][6] He was internationally known for writing, directing, and starring in the Chespirito
Chespirito
(1970-1973, 1980-1995), El Chavo del Ocho
El Chavo del Ocho
(1973-1980), and El Chapulín Colorado
El Chapulín Colorado
(1973-1979) television series
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Zapatista Uprising
The Zapatista uprising was a 1994 rebellion in Mexico, coordinated by the Zapatista Army of National Liberation
Zapatista Army of National Liberation
in response to the implementation of the NAFTA
NAFTA
agreement. After 12 days of fighting a ceasefire was called and peace talks began.[4]Contents1 Background 2 Events 3 Aftermath 4 See also 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] The NAFTA
NAFTA
agreement included cancellation of Article 27 of Mexico's constitution, the cornerstone of Emiliano Zapata's revolution of 1910–1919. Under Article 27, Native communal landholdings were protected from sale or privatization. However, this barrier to investment was incompatible with NAFTA. With the removal of Article 27, Native farmers feared the loss of their remaining lands, and also feared cheap imports from the US. Thus, the Zapatistas labelled NAFTA as a "death sentence" to Native communities all over Mexico
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Surname
A surname, family name, or last name is the portion of a personal name that indicates a person's family (or tribe or community, depending on the culture).[1] Depending on the culture all members of a family unit may have identical surnames or there may be variations based on the cultural rules. In the English-speaking world, a surname is commonly referred to as a last name because it is usually placed at the end of a person's full name, after any given names. In many parts of Asia, as well as some parts of Europe
Europe
and Africa, the family name is placed before a person's given name. In most Spanish-speaking and Portuguese-speaking countries, two surnames are commonly used and in some families that claim a connection to nobility even three are used. Surnames have not always existed and today are not universal in all cultures. This tradition has arisen separately in different cultures around the world
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Privatization
Privatization (also spelled privatisation) is the purchase of all outstanding shares of a publicly traded company by private investors, or the sale of a state-owned enterprise to private investors. In the case of a for-profit company, the shares are then no longer traded at a stock exchange, as the company became private through private equity; in the case the partial or full sale of a state-owned enterprise to private owners shares may be traded in the public market for the first time, or for the first time since an enterprise's previous nationalization
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Free Market
In economics, a free market is an idealized system in which the prices for goods and services are determined by the open market and consumers, in which the laws and forces of supply and demand are free from any intervention by a government, price-setting monopoly, or other authority. Proponents of the concept of free market contrast it with a regulated market, in which a government intervenes in supply and demand through various methods such as tariffs used to restrict trade and protect the economy. In an idealized free market economy, prices for goods and services are set freely by the forces of supply and demand and are allowed to reach their point of equilibrium without intervention by government policy. In scholarly debates, the concept of a free market is contrasted with the concept of a coordinated market in fields of study such as political economy, new institutional economics, economic sociology, and political science
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Neoliberalism
Neoliberalism
Neoliberalism
or neo-liberalism[1] refers primarily to the 20th-century resurgence of 19th-century ideas associated with laissez-faire economic liberalism.[2]:7 Those ideas include economic liberalization policies such as privatization, austerity, deregulation, free trade[3] and reductions in government spending in order to increase the role of the private sector in the economy and society.[11] These market-based ideas and the policies they inspired constitute a paradigm shift away from the post-war Keynesian consensus which lasted from 1945 to 1980.[12][13] English-speakers have use
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Mexicans
Mexicans
Mexicans
(Spanish: mexicanos) are the people of the United Mexican States, a multiethnic country in North America. Mexicans
Mexicans
can also be those who identify with the Mexican cultural or national identity. The Mexica
Mexica
founded Mexico-Tenochtitlan in 1325 as an altepetl (city-state) located on an island in Lake Texcoco, in the Valley of Mexico. It became the capital of the expanding Mexica
Mexica
Empire in the 15th century,[11] until captured by the Spanish in 1521. At its peak, it was the largest city in the Pre-Columbian
Pre-Columbian
Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain
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